http://www.pacific.edu/Academics/Schools-and-Colleges/College-of-the-Pacific/Academics/Departments-and-Programs/Sociology.html
Phone: (209) 946-2101
Location: Wendell Phillips Center

Susan Mannon, Chair

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Arts

Majors Offered

Sociology
Sociology - Criminal Justice Concentration
Sociology/Master of Public Policy Blended Program
Sociology - Criminal Justice Concentration/Master of Public Policy Blended Program

Minors Offered

Sociology

Mission Statement

The Sociology Department at University of the Pacific gives students the knowledge and skills to think structurally, systematically, and critically about society.  In this program, students will develop a sociological imagination that places individual life experiences in the context of the social and cultural structures that shape them, as well as an appreciation for the role that social inequalities play in organizing social life and shaping life chances. The program provides students a foundation in sociological concepts, social theory, research methods, and public sociology. Through various modes of learning in and outside the classroom, students learn to address social justice issues and systematic inequalities in a complex and diverse society. (Developed and adopted by department, Fall 2018)

Career Opportunities

Undergraduate study in sociology leads to employment in a wide variety of careers. Many take positions in social services, counseling, government, criminal justice system and public health. Study in sociology also provides an excellent foundation for further study in law, human resources, public policy, urban planning and similar fields.

Progression of Study

Though some of our students come to Pacific as freshmen with sociology as their major, many students transfer to Pacific after studying sociology at a community college or declare the major after their first year at Pacific. Regardless of when students become part of the department, we recommend that they take Introduction to Sociology (SOCI 51), Self and Society (SOCI 79), and the Sociology Cohort Seminar (SOCI 71) as soon as possible. In addition to lower and upper division electives, students should then take Theories of Society and Culture (SOCI 177) and Social Inequality (SOCI 172).  We recommend that students take their statistics course and Social Research Methods (SOCI 171) their second to last year, since both are important foundations for Experiential Learning (SOCI 187) and the Capstone Seminar (SOCI 179), which students take in their final year at Pacific. Experiential Learning involves an internship, volunteer experience, or work experience around which students design a research project. They are expected to complete this work before their final semester at Pacific, during which they will write up and present their research in the Capstone Seminar (SOCI 179).  The major is designed so that it can be completed in two years. 

Bachelor of Arts Major in Sociology

Students must complete a minimum of 120 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree with a major in sociology,.

I. General Education Requirements

For more details, see General Education

Minimum 28 units and 9 courses that include:

A. CORE Seminars (2 courses)

CORE 001Problem Solving & Oral Comm3
CORE 002Writing and Critical Thinking4

Note: 1) CORE Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer credits taken after high school are exempt from both CORE seminars. Students participating in the First Year Honors Program should complete an honors section of CORE 001 regardless of the number of college transfer units completed. 

B. Breadth Requirement (7 courses, at least 3 units each)

At least one course from each of the following areas:
Artistic Process & Creation
Civic & Global Responsibility
Language & Narratives
Quantitative Reasoning
Scientific Inquiry
Social Inquiry
World Perspectives & Ethics

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline can be used to meet the Breadth Requirement.

C. Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

All students must complete Diversity and Inclusion coursework (at least 3 units)

Note: 1) Diversity and Inclusion courses can also be used to meet the breadth category requirements, or major or minor requirements.

D. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:
Writing
Quantitative Analysis (Math)

Note: 1) Failure to satisfy the fundamental skills requirements by the end of four semesters of full-time study at the University is grounds for academic disqualification.

II. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

III. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 60 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

IV. Major Requirements

Minimum 42 units and 10 courses that include:

SOCI 051Introduction to Sociology4
SOCI 071Sociology Cohort Seminar *1
SOCI 079Self and Society *4
SOCI 171Social Research Methods4
SOCI 172Social Inequality4
SOCI 177Theories of Society and Culture4
SOCI 179Capstone Seminar *3
Select one of the following statistic courses:4
Political Science Research
Elementary Statistical Inference
Introduction to Statistics and Probability
Three SOCI Electives (Three additional courses, two of which are numbered 100 or above excluding SOCI 051, SOCI 187A, SOCI 187B, SOCI 197A, and SOCI 197B) **12
Select one of the following electives:4
Culture and Economy
Culture and Power
Media and Society
Documentary Film as Persuasive Communication
Intercultural Communication
English 25
Environment and Literature
Contemporary Critical Issues
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Introduction to Gender Studies
Sport, Culture and U.S. Society
Women in United States History
United States Since 1945
Borderlands
Contemporary World Issues
Introduction to Law and Policy in the American Political System
U.S. Government and Politics
Government in Action: Public Policy Analysis
Introduction to Public Administration
Social Ethics
Religion, Race, Justice in US
Select one of the following experiential learning courses:4
Co-op Internship
Co-op Internship
JCTR 187 Community Affairs Internship
Experiential Learning
Independent Research
Independent Research

Bachelor of Arts Major in Sociology - Criminal Justice Concentration

Students must complete a minimum of 120 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree with a major in sociology - Criminal Justice Concentration.

I. General Education Requirements

For more details, see General Education

Minimum 28 units and 9 courses that include:

A. CORE Seminars (2 courses)

CORE 001Problem Solving & Oral Comm3
CORE 002Writing and Critical Thinking4

Note: 1) CORE Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer credits taken after high school are exempt from both CORE seminars. Students participating in the First Year Honors Program should complete an honors section of CORE 001 regardless of the number of college transfer units completed. 

B. Breadth Requirement (7 courses, at least 3 units each)

At least one course from each of the following areas:
Artistic Process & Creation
Civic & Global Responsibility
Language & Narratives
Quantitative Reasoning
Scientific Inquiry
Social Inquiry
World Perspectives & Ethics

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline can be used to meet the Breadth Requirement.

C. Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

All students must complete Diversity and Inclusion coursework (at least 3 units)

Note: 1) Diversity and Inclusion courses can also be used to meet the breadth category requirements, or major or minor requirements.

D. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:
Writing
Quantitative Analysis (Math)

Note: 1) Failure to satisfy the fundamental skills requirements by the end of four semesters of full-time study at the University is grounds for academic disqualification.

II. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

III. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 60 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

IV. Major Requirements

 Minimum 14 courses that include:

POLS 031Introduction to Law and Policy in the American Political System4
POLS 133Political Science Research4
or INTL 101 Social Science Research Methods
SOCI 033Criminology4
SOCI 051Introduction to Sociology4
SOCI 071Sociology Cohort Seminar1
SOCI 079Self and Society4
SOCI 139Corrections4
SOCI 172Social Inequality4
SOCI 177Theories of Society and Culture4
SOCI 179Capstone Seminar3
Three (3) of the following electives, with at least one POLS course and one SOCI course:
Urban Government
Urban Society
Government in Action: Public Policy Analysis
Introduction to Public Administration
Courts and Judicial Behavior
Criminal Law
Jurisprudence
Deviant Behavior
Social Problems
Introduction to Social Services
Race and Ethnicity
One (1) of the following experiential learning courses: *
Experiential Learning
Independent Research
Sacramento Experience Internship
Washington Semester Internship

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology/Master of Public Policy Blended Program

Students must complete a minimum of 150 units with a Pacific undergraduate cumulative and major/program grade point average of 3.0 in order to earn the Bachelor of Arts in Sociology degree and Master of Public Policy degree.

Note: 1) A total of eight upper division units can count towards both degrees. 2) An additional 11 graduate units can count towards the BA degree. 3) Acceptance into the graduate portion of this blended program is conditional on (a) completion of all undergraduate program requirements by the end of the seventh semester at Pacific and (b) a minimum 3.0 cumulative Pacific undergraduate GPA.

I. General Education Requirements

For more details, see General Education

Minimum 28 units and 9 courses that include:

A. CORE Seminars (2 courses)

CORE 001Problem Solving & Oral Comm3
CORE 002Writing and Critical Thinking4

Note: 1) CORE Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer credits taken after high school are exempt from both CORE seminars. Students participating in the First Year Honors Program should complete an honors section of CORE 001 regardless of the number of college transfer units completed. 

B. Breadth Requirement (7 courses, at least 3 units each)

At least one course from each of the following areas:
Artistic Process & Creation
Civic & Global Responsibility
Language & Narratives
Quantitative Reasoning
Scientific Inquiry
Social Inquiry
World Perspectives & Ethics

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline can be used to meet the Breadth Requirement.

C. Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

All students must complete Diversity and Inclusion coursework (at least 3 units)

Note: 1) Diversity and Inclusion courses can also be used to meet the breadth category requirements, or major or minor requirements.

D. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:
Writing
Quantitative Analysis (Math)

Note: 1) Failure to satisfy the fundamental skills requirements by the end of four semesters of full-time study at the University is grounds for academic disqualification.

II. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

III. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 60 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

IV. Major Requirements

Minimum 42 units and 10 courses that include:

SOCI 051Introduction to Sociology4
SOCI 071Sociology Cohort Seminar *1
SOCI 079Self and Society *4
SOCI 171Social Research Methods4
SOCI 172Social Inequality4
SOCI 177Theories of Society and Culture4
SOCI 179Capstone Seminar *3
Select one of the following statistic courses:4
Political Science Research
Elementary Statistical Inference
Introduction to Statistics and Probability
Three SOCI Electives (Three additional courses, two of which are numbered 100 or above excluding SOCI 051, SOCI 187A, SOCI 187B, SOCI 197A, and SOCI 197B) **12
Select one of the following electives:4
Culture and Economy
Culture and Power
Media and Society
Documentary Film as Persuasive Communication
Intercultural Communication
English 25
Environment and Literature
Contemporary Critical Issues
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Introduction to Gender Studies
Sport, Culture and U.S. Society
Women in United States History
United States Since 1945
Borderlands
Contemporary World Issues
Introduction to Law and Policy in the American Political System
U.S. Government and Politics
Government in Action: Public Policy Analysis
Introduction to Public Administration
Social Ethics
Religion, Race, Justice in US
Select one of the following experiential learning courses:4
Co-op Internship
Co-op Internship
JCTR 187 Community Affairs Internship
Experiential Learning
Independent Research
Independent Research

VII. Undergraduate Public Policy Preparation

Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics4
POLS 041U.S. Government and Politics4
SOCI 041Social Problems4
Select four of the following, with at least one each from Economics and Political Science:
Economics courses (Pick at least one)
Public Finance
Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
Labor Economics
Health Economics
Political Science courses (Pick at least one)
Global Environmental Policy
Introduction to Health Policy
U.S. Foreign Policy
Public Affairs courses
Public Advocacy
Intercultural Communication
American Immigration
Women in United States History
American Environmental History
Criminology
Environment and Society
Sociology of Health and Illness
Urban Society

VIII. Master of Public Policy Requirements

Required of MPP

Minimum GPA:  Your cumulative grade point average must be 3.00 or higher in those courses required for award of the MPA, MPA with concentration, or MPP.

Required Courses: All core courses in four areas, including:
LAW
LAW 212Intro. to Legal Analysis2
LAW 517Statutes and Regulations3
PUBLIC POLICY
PUB 211Pub Pol: Conflicted, Complex, Uncertain3
PUB 213Enhancing Societal Capacity3
PUB 214Budgets, Financial Management3
PUB 252Capstone: Strategy, Implementation3
PUB 291Externship3
ANALYTIC TOOLS
PUB 221Economic Concepts and Tools3
PUB 222Finance for Public Policies3
PUB 233Public Manager Analytics3
PUB 234Advanced Policy Analytics3
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION/LEADERSHIP
PUB 218Professional Skills1
PUB 241Leaders, Organization Behavior3
PUB 242Systemic Change3
PUB 251Pub Admin: Values, Roles and Skills3


Required internship:  Between the first and second year, MPP students complete an approved internship.

Required courses in a concentration (or electives):  To complete a designated area of concentration, six (6) units as specified for that area of concentration.  Alternatively, take sufficient elective courses to achieve a total of 48 units, receiving the MPP without a concentration.

Environmental and Water Policy - 6 Units
Complete 6 or more units from among these courses
LAW 230Water Resources Law (This course is offered in a 2 and 3 unit format. If taken as 2 units, you must take 1 additional elective unit.)3
LAW 507Environmental Law3
LAW 235Environmental Practice3
LAW 500Administrative Law3
LAW 509Special Topics in Environmental Law2 or 3
LAW 510Natural Resources Law3
PUB 219Directed Research1-3
Capital Policy Making - 6 units
Complete 6 or more units from among these courses
LAW 513California Lobbying & Politics2
LAW 576Cap. Lawyering and Pol. Making2
LAW 822Lawmaking in California2
Legislative & Public Policy Clinic *
PUB 219Directed Research1-3

*LAW 853 requires students to register for 3 units in each Fall & Spring.      

Public and Non-Profit Leadership - 6 Units
Complete 6 or more units from among these courses
LAW 101Contracts/Analytical Skills4
LAW 110Contracts4
LAW 209Local Agency Practice2
LAW 500Administrative Law3
LAW 513California Lobbying & Politics2
LAW 560Land Use Planning2
LAW 802Negotiation and Settlements Seminar2 or 3
LAW 822Lawmaking in California2
LAW 826Negotiating Disputes Into Deals1
PUB 213Enhancing Societal Capacity3
PUB 219Directed Research1-3
Policy Change, Institutional Reform, Sustainability - MPA ONLY- 6 units
Complete 6 or more units from among these courses:
LAW 500Administrative Law3
LAW 822Lawmaking in California2
PUB 213Enhancing Societal Capacity3
PUB 219Directed Research1-3
PUB 222Finance for Public Policies3
PUB 234Advanced Policy Analytics3

Bachelor of Arts Major in Sociology - Criminal Justice Concentration/Master of Public Policy Blended Program

Students must complete a minimum of 150 units with a Pacific undergraduate cumulative and major/program grade point average of 3.0 in order to earn the Bachelor of Arts Major in Sociology - Criminal Justice Concentration degree and Master of Public Policy degree.

Note: 1) A total of eight upper division units can count towards both degrees. 2) An additional 11 graduate units can count towards the BA degree. 3) Acceptance into the graduate portion of this blended program is conditional on (a) completion of all undergraduate program requirements by the end of the seventh semester at Pacific and (b) a minimum 3.0 cumulative Pacific undergraduate GPA.

I. General Education Requirements

For more details, see General Education

Minimum 28 units and 9 courses that include:

A. CORE Seminars (2 courses)

CORE 001Problem Solving & Oral Comm3
CORE 002Writing and Critical Thinking4

Note: 1) CORE Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer credits taken after high school are exempt from both CORE seminars. Students participating in the First Year Honors Program should complete an honors section of CORE 001 regardless of the number of college transfer units completed. 

B. Breadth Requirement (7 courses, at least 3 units each)

At least one course from each of the following areas:
Artistic Process & Creation
Civic & Global Responsibility
Language & Narratives
Quantitative Reasoning
Scientific Inquiry
Social Inquiry
World Perspectives & Ethics

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline can be used to meet the Breadth Requirement.

C. Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

All students must complete Diversity and Inclusion coursework (at least 3 units)

Note: 1) Diversity and Inclusion courses can also be used to meet the breadth category requirements, or major or minor requirements.

D. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:
Writing
Quantitative Analysis (Math)

Note: 1) Failure to satisfy the fundamental skills requirements by the end of four semesters of full-time study at the University is grounds for academic disqualification.

II. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

III. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 60 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

IV. Major Requirements

 Minimum 14 courses that include:

POLS 031Introduction to Law and Policy in the American Political System4
POLS 133Political Science Research4
or INTL 101 Social Science Research Methods
SOCI 033Criminology4
SOCI 051Introduction to Sociology4
SOCI 071Sociology Cohort Seminar1
SOCI 079Self and Society4
SOCI 139Corrections4
SOCI 172Social Inequality4
SOCI 177Theories of Society and Culture4
SOCI 179Capstone Seminar3
Three (3) of the following electives, with at least one POLS course and one SOCI course:
Urban Government
Urban Society
Government in Action: Public Policy Analysis
Introduction to Public Administration
Courts and Judicial Behavior
Criminal Law
Jurisprudence
Deviant Behavior
Social Problems
Introduction to Social Services
Race and Ethnicity
One (1) of the following experiential learning courses: *
Experiential Learning
Independent Research
Sacramento Experience Internship
Washington Semester Internship

VII. Undergraduate Public Policy Preparation

Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics4
POLS 041U.S. Government and Politics4
SOCI 041Social Problems4
Select four of the following, with at least one each from Economics and Political Science:
Economics courses (Pick at least one)
Public Finance
Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
Labor Economics
Health Economics
Political Science courses (Pick at least one)
Global Environmental Policy
Introduction to Health Policy
U.S. Foreign Policy
Public Affairs courses
Public Advocacy
Intercultural Communication
American Immigration
Women in United States History
American Environmental History
Criminology
Environment and Society
Sociology of Health and Illness
Urban Society

VIII. Master of Public Policy Requirements

Required of MPP

Minimum GPA:  Your cumulative grade point average must be 3.00 or higher in those courses required for award of the MPA, MPA with concentration, or MPP.

Required Courses: All core courses in four areas, including:
LAW
LAW 212Intro. to Legal Analysis2
LAW 517Statutes and Regulations3
PUBLIC POLICY
PUB 211Pub Pol: Conflicted, Complex, Uncertain3
PUB 213Enhancing Societal Capacity3
PUB 214Budgets, Financial Management3
PUB 252Capstone: Strategy, Implementation3
PUB 291Externship3
ANALYTIC TOOLS
PUB 221Economic Concepts and Tools3
PUB 222Finance for Public Policies3
PUB 233Public Manager Analytics3
PUB 234Advanced Policy Analytics3
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION/LEADERSHIP
PUB 218Professional Skills1
PUB 241Leaders, Organization Behavior3
PUB 242Systemic Change3
PUB 251Pub Admin: Values, Roles and Skills3


Required internship:  Between the first and second year, MPP students complete an approved internship.

Required courses in a concentration (or electives):  To complete a designated area of concentration, six (6) units as specified for that area of concentration.  Alternatively, take sufficient elective courses to achieve a total of 48 units, receiving the MPP without a concentration.

Environmental and Water Policy - 6 Units
Complete 6 or more units from among these courses
LAW 230Water Resources Law (This course is offered in a 2 and 3 unit format. If taken as 2 units, you must take 1 additional elective unit.)3
LAW 507Environmental Law3
LAW 235Environmental Practice3
LAW 500Administrative Law3
LAW 509Special Topics in Environmental Law2 or 3
LAW 510Natural Resources Law3
PUB 219Directed Research1-3
Capital Policy Making - 6 units
Complete 6 or more units from among these courses
LAW 513California Lobbying & Politics2
LAW 576Cap. Lawyering and Pol. Making2
LAW 822Lawmaking in California2
Legislative & Public Policy Clinic *
PUB 219Directed Research1-3

*LAW 853 requires students to register for 3 units in each Fall & Spring.      

Public and Non-Profit Leadership - 6 Units
Complete 6 or more units from among these courses
LAW 101Contracts/Analytical Skills4
LAW 110Contracts4
LAW 209Local Agency Practice2
LAW 500Administrative Law3
LAW 513California Lobbying & Politics2
LAW 560Land Use Planning2
LAW 802Negotiation and Settlements Seminar2 or 3
LAW 822Lawmaking in California2
LAW 826Negotiating Disputes Into Deals1
PUB 213Enhancing Societal Capacity3
PUB 219Directed Research1-3
Policy Change, Institutional Reform, Sustainability - MPA ONLY- 6 units
Complete 6 or more units from among these courses:
LAW 500Administrative Law3
LAW 822Lawmaking in California2
PUB 213Enhancing Societal Capacity3
PUB 219Directed Research1-3
PUB 222Finance for Public Policies3
PUB 234Advanced Policy Analytics3

Bachelor of Arts Major in Sociology/ Master of Social Work Pathway Program

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Sociology/Master of Social Work (MSW) Pathway Program offers an accelerated program of study for students who want to complete their BA in Sociology in 3.5 years while earning credits toward a Pacific MSW degree. Undergraduate students apply to this pathway program in the spring semester of their sophomore year. To be eligible for the program, they must have a minimum grade point average of 3.3 in health studies, humanities, and social and behavioral science courses. Once in the program, pathway students must complete 120 units and all other BA requirements by the end of the fall semester of their senior year. Fifteen of these units (five courses) may come from the MSW program and may also count toward the MSW program if the student achieves a grade of 'B' or better. To be eligible for admission into the MSW program, pathway students must obtain a grade of 'B' or better in the five MSW courses, and maintain a minimum 3.3 grade point average in all health studies, humanities, and social and behavioral science courses. Pathway students apply to Pacific's MSW program in the fall of their senior year and must be accepted before moving on to the MSW program. If accepted, they can complete the MSW in one year.

I. General Education Requirements

For more details, see General Education

Minimum 28 units and 9 courses that include:

A. CORE Seminars (2 courses)

CORE 001Problem Solving & Oral Comm3
CORE 002Writing and Critical Thinking4

Note: 1) CORE Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer credits taken after high school are exempt from both CORE seminars. Students participating in the First Year Honors Program should complete an honors section of CORE 001 regardless of the number of college transfer units completed. 

B. Breadth Requirement (7 courses, at least 3 units each)

At least one course from each of the following areas:
Artistic Process & Creation
Civic & Global Responsibility
Language & Narratives
Quantitative Reasoning
Scientific Inquiry
Social Inquiry
World Perspectives & Ethics

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline can be used to meet the Breadth Requirement.

C. Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

All students must complete Diversity and Inclusion coursework (at least 3 units)

Note: 1) Diversity and Inclusion courses can also be used to meet the breadth category requirements, or major or minor requirements.

D. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:
Writing
Quantitative Analysis (Math)

Note: 1) Failure to satisfy the fundamental skills requirements by the end of four semesters of full-time study at the University is grounds for academic disqualification.

II. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

III. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 60 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

IV. Major Requirements

Minimum 10 courses that include:

SOCI 051Introduction to Sociology4
SOCI 071Sociology Cohort Seminar1
SOCI 079Self and Society4
SOCI 081Introduction to Social Services4
SOCI 172Social Inequality4
INTL 101Social Science Research Methods4
Three (3) of the following sociology electives, at least two of which must be upper division:
Sociology of Marriage and Family
Deviant Behavior
Criminology
Social Problems
Food, Culture and Society
Sex and Gender
Sociology of Health and Illness
Corrections
Race and Ethnicity
Urban Society
Social Organizations
One (1) of the following experiential learning courses: *
Experiential Learning
Independent Research
Sacramento Experience Internship
Washington Semester Internship
Students in the pathway program must take five courses in the MSW program during the fall of their junior and senior years: SOCW 201, SOCW 203, SOCW 205, SOCW 207, and SOCW 209. These courses may count toward both the 120-unit requirement and the MSW program requirements. In order to be admitted and transfer these courses into the MSW program, students must earn a grade of 'B' or better in all five courses and maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 in all health studies, humanities, and social and behavioral science courses.
Students who do not apply to the MSW program can still earn a Bachelor of Arts by completing all program requirements in the sociology major. In this case, they may substitute completed MSW coursework in which they earned a 'C-' or better for comparable courses in the sociology major.

Minor in Sociology

It is designed to provide a general introduction to the field and a broad overview of social interaction and structure. Students are required to work closely with a minor advisor in constructing a coherent course of study.

Students must complete a minimum of 20 units and 5 courses with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in sociology.

Minor Requirements:

SOCI 051Introduction to Sociology4
SOCI 171Social Research Methods4
One SOCI Elective (numbered below -100 excluding SOCI 051)4
Two SOCI Electives (numbered 100 or above excluding SOCI 187A, SOCI 187B, SOCI 197A, and SOCI 197B)8


Note: 1) Electives are chosen in consultation with the advisor.

Sociology Courses

SOCI 021. Culture and Society. 4 Units.

Students examine the various forms of culture and their linkages to our society. The course looks at what culture is and what it means to people—how it links them together and drives them apart. Topics include how culture is “created,” and by whom; what restraints are placed upon cultural creation by individuals and society; how culture is manufactured and “sold” to large audiences; subcultures and the creation of cultural identity; the diffusion of culture both within societies and between them; the process of globalization and effects of American culture overseas. Special emphasis on the impacts of social stratification, class, gender and race. (DVSY, GE1B)

SOCI 027. Sociology of Marriage and Family. 4 Units.

In this course, family life is examined through a historical, cultural and political lens to contextualize the changing institution of the family. The evolution of the family is studied both historically and comparatively, but the focus is on the contemporary U.S. family. Special attention is given to the changing significance of sexuality in marriage, the persistent gendered nature of family structure and organization, and evolving norms around childbearing and childrearing. Other topics that will be addressed include domestic violence, divorce, out-of-wedlock childbearing, and alternative family forms. The course emphasizes how family life varies across race and ethnic groups, social class, religion and geographic location. (ETHC, GEND)

SOCI 031. Deviant Behavior. 4 Units.

This course critically examines various sociological approaches to the study of deviant behavior. Special attention is paid to the problem of defining deviance in a useful manner for sociological study—and not just as officially illegal behavior. Most forms of deviance, ranging from major infractions of societal norms (such as rape or child abuse) to less extreme, but still significant deviant acts (such as marijuana smoking or illegal file sharing) is discussed. In addition, the political and economic elite is examined with respect to their ability to define deviance, their use of punishment as social control, and the ways they are able to “hide” crime to their own advantage. American data is supplemented by cross-cultural and comparative materials. (DVSY, GE1A)

SOCI 033. Criminology. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of the nature and extent of crime, theories of crime causation, the social correlates of crime, and the structure of the criminal justice system. The geographic focus of the course will be the United States, though international comparisons may be brought in for a comparative perspective. (ETHC, GE1A, PLAW)

SOCI 041. Social Problems. 4 Units.

This course is an exploration of the process by which various social conditions become labeled as social problems worthy of policy responses. It examines the various roles played by the media, government actors, activists and everyday citizens in this process, and pays particular attention to the role of power in enabling some social groups to label the behaviors of others an problematic while deflecting attention from their own practices. This course focuses predominantly on the US, but also engages in comparative analysis with other countries. (DVSY, ETHC, GE1B, GEND)

SOCI 051. Introduction to Sociology. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the field of sociology, a discipline that studies how larger social and cultural forces shape the human experience. The course introduces students to the sociological imagination or mindset, the various forms of social inequality, and the major social institutions. Many of the discipline’s major concepts, social theories and research methods are highlighted throughout the course, which focuses primarily on U.S. society. (DVSY, GE1B)

SOCI 071. Sociology Cohort Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to introduce sociology majors to the field of sociology and the sociology program. You will meet weekly in a seminar-like setting to discuss reading material; explore the sociological curriculum; and learn about faculty, resources and opportunities at the university. By the end of the course, students are expected to understand how to make the most of their college experience and their sociological training.

SOCI 079. Self and Society. 4 Units.

This course addresses how we define and understand ourselves in relation to society. Drawing from the sub-field of micro-sociology, it examines individual and small-scale social interactions. Topics include the nature and scope of micro-sociology, the structure of social interaction, the development and maintenance of the social self, and the production and influence of culture. The course also explores the ways that hierarchies of race, class, gender and nation shape social identity. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: SOCI 051. (GEND)

SOCI 081. Introduction to Social Services. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to social welfare by using various political perspectives and provides an overview of social services. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of social work as a profession and better understand how social policies are applied to attempt to deal with various social problems. The course also examines the types of social services provided, the client population targeted, the organization of agencies, funding mechanisms, and program design and evaluation. This course combines classroom work with minimal fieldwork with non-profit agencies.

SOCI 108. Food, Culture and Society. 4 Units.

Are you what you eat, or do you eat what you are? This course focuses on the role of food in society, with an emphasis on understanding food in its social and cultural contexts. Topics include food and nutrition; problems of over- and under-eating; food fads; food sacrifices and taboos; food and social and ethnic identity; and the global politics of food. Although beginning with a look at American food ways, the course is highly cross-cultural and comparative in nature. (DVSY, ENST, ETHC)

SOCI 111. Environment and Society. 4 Units.

Students examine the relationship between society and the natural world. It comparatively analyzes theories concerning how humans relate to the natural world as well as the causes of environmental degradation. It attends to the various roles of the biological and social sciences in understanding environmental issues, as well as the relationship between environment and inequality. The course analyzes how various social systems, institutions and behaviors contribute to environmental degradation, and highlights and compares political solutions. (DVSY, ENST, ETHC, GE3C)

SOCI 114. Social and Cultural Change. 4 Units.

Foundational theorists like Karl Marx and Max Weber were preoccupied with the rapid changes that overtook Western Europe as societies industrialized, modernized, and became part of a global capitalist economy. Likewise, contemporary sociologists examine how societies are transformed under conditions of advanced capitalism and late modernity. This course goes to the heart of sociology by centering on the “big” question first posed by Marx and Weber: how do capitalism and modernity continue to reconfigure social, political and economic life? The course takes a global perspective on this question, considering case studies from within and outside the United States. It also highlights how race, class and gender are reconfigured in particular societies by macro-structural forces.

SOCI 123. Sex and Gender. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to the sociological study of sex and gender. Sociologists define gender as a social category that is organized around perceived biological differences between men and women. As such, the study of gender is not simply the study of women. It is the study of how gender categories, identities, and institutions structure our lives and society. The course critically analyzes the sex and gender categories that organize social life and investigates how gender identities are constructed in everyday social life. Particular attention is paid to how social institutions reinforce gender identities and reproduce gender inequalities over time, as well as how sex and gender are intricately linked to other social statuses such as race, class, and sexuality. (DVSY, ETHC, GEND)

SOCI 125. Sociology of Health and Illness. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to the sociology of medicine and the delivery of health care, with an emphasis on the interaction of patients, health care professionals, and social institutions. Topics of examination include health care settings, provider-patient relationships, ethical issues in health care, and trends in medicine and policies. Additionally, the course explores how race, class, and gender affect people’s health and illness in addition to how health policies shape the medical system, and how definitions, attitudes, and beliefs affect health and illness. (DVSY, ETHC, GE1B, GEND)

SOCI 139. Corrections. 4 Units.

Students examine the history and theories of and current practices in institutional and non-institutional programs addressed to the correctional treatment of juvenile and adult offenders. Prerequisite: a course in sociology or permission of instructor. (PLAW)

SOCI 141. Race and Ethnicity. 4 Units.

Historical and contemporary forms of prejudice and racism are the focus of this course. Social institutions such as the media, education, family and government are examined for their role in fostering and challenging prejudice and racism. Course readings address how race intersects with other forms of inequality (e.g., gender, class, etc.) Although centered in Sociology, the course materials are interdisciplinary in nature. (DVSY, ETHC)

SOCI 161. Urban Society. 4 Units.

What effects has the historical emergence of cities had on human social interaction and public life? How do urban places structure social relations and create identities and cultural meanings? This course explores the development of the city and its effects on social life. Particular attention is given to issues of poverty, interracial interaction and segregation, suburbanization, gentrification, urban development and urban cultural movements. Though this course takes US metropolitan areas as its primary focus, it also draws on global examples. (ETHC)

SOCI 165. Social Organizations. 4 Units.

Students explore the social structure of communities and the influence of organizations and social institutions on individuals and groups. The course focuses primarily on the dynamics of community level organizations, and it analyzes social service, nonprofit, voluntary, public, and similar kinds of civic sector organizations and agencies, and the social issues to which they respond. Students also examine basic principles of organization that include program development, team building, leadership and related topics as strategies for responding to human needs to solve social problems and achieve social change. Prerequisite: a course in sociology or permission of instructor.

SOCI 171. Social Research Methods. 4 Units.

This course reviews and examines the various methods used in social science research to gather and analyze data. The course considers the relationship between social theory and such methodologies as experiments, observations, interviews, surveys and content analysis. It guides students in each of these data collection techniques and introduces students to quantitative and qualitative data analysis. It also considers the ethical issues involved in the use of such methods. Student designed research projects are a central part of this course. Prerequisites: SOCI 051, SOCI 071, and SOCI 079. (PLAW)

SOCI 172. Social Inequality. 4 Units.

This course examines the historical causes, current structure, and consequences of social inequality. The emphasis is on contemporary social, economic and political issues in the United States. This course focuses on various group experiences of inequality due to race, class, gender, sexual orientation, immigration status, nativity, etc. Various sociological perspectives and empirical research are applied to gain a better understanding on how social inequality is created, manifested, and maintained. Students investigate the effects of social inequality on society, and possible frameworks to reduce the level of social inequality. Prerequisites: SOCI 051, SOCI 071, and SOCI 079. (DVSY, ETHC, GEND)

SOCI 177. Theories of Society and Culture. 4 Units.

This course provides a broad overview of sociological theory at both the macro- and micro-levels. The course texts explore classic and contemporary sociological theories. Students who complete this course will learn how scholars define and use theory in the development of sociological knowledge. Throughout the semester students examine basic theoretical assumptions and learn how different perspectives compare and contrast with each other. Prerequisites: SOCI 051, SOCI 071, and SOCI 079.

SOCI 179. Capstone Seminar. 3 Units.

The purpose of the capstone seminar is to give sociology students the opportunity to revisit their sociological training and to consider how sociology might fit into their life after college. The class meets once a week to discuss the value of the sociology degree and the careers available to sociology majors. Throughout the course, students will develop a professional portfolio to showcase their sociological skillset. They will also present on a sociological concept in order to demonstrate their ability to apply and communicate sociological knowledge outside an academic setting. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: SOCI 187.

SOCI 187A. Experiential Learning. 4 Units.

This course provides an intellectually rigorous experiential learning opportunity to majors. It is an advanced course designed to further explore sociological concepts through direct experience, observation, reflection and analysis. Students choose a field site where they spend approximately 8-10 hours per week. Class meetings help students to develop their research and writing skills. This course results in the production of a publishable or presentation quality piece of original research. Prerequisites, may be taken concurrently: SOCI 171 and SOCI 177.

SOCI 191. Independent Study. 2-4 Units.

SOCI 197. Independent Research. 2-4 Units.

Sociological Perspective

  • Explain how sociologists understand the human experience differently than scholars in other disciplines.
  • Define and illustrate core concepts in the discipline, including the sociological imagination, socialization, social institutions, social stratification and social change.
  • Apply a sociological concept to at least one substantive area addressed by sociologists (e.g. health, criminology, education, etc.)

Social Theory

  • Identify the major theoretical traditions in sociology.
  • Explain how theories reflect the historical contexts of the times and cultures in which they were developed.
  • Demonstrate an ability to apply social theory to some social phenomena or issue.

Social Research Methods

  • Describe the different techniques for data collection and analysis.
  • Analyze social scientific data using qualitative and quantitative data analysis techniques.
  • Evaluate the quality of data used in both sociological research and in public discourse.
  • Locate and utilize sociological scholarship to understand a social issue or phenomenon.
  • Locate and utilize empirical evidence to construct a sociological argument about the social world.
  • Design a research project to address a research question, including plans for sampling, data collection, and analysis.

Public Sociology

  • Express sociological ideas clearly in written and oral communication.
  • Demonstrate technological proficiency in communicating publicly about social issues.
  • Understand the value that sociological knowledge and skills have for life, work and citizenship.

Sociology Faculty

Marcia Hernandez, Associate Professor and Associate Dean of the College, 2005, BA, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1994; Ph.D., State University of New York, Albany, 2007.

Susan Mannon, Associate Professor and Chair, 2013, BA University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1996; M.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1998; Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2003.

Alison H. Alkon, Associate Professor, 2008, BA, Emory University, 1999; MA, University of California, Davis, 2003; Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 2008.

Cristina Ortiz, Assistant Professor, 2019, BA, University of California, Berkeley, 2005; A.M., University of Chicago, 2008, 2011; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2017.