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Art, Media, Performance, and Design

Art History Courses

ARTH 007. Survey of World Art to 1400. 4 Units.

This foundational level art history course surveys the major periods of world art from the Stone Age to the onset of the Renaissance in the West during the 14th-century. This is a lecture-based course that uses visual images to examine the characteristics and styles of each period. Works of art are placed in their aesthetic, social, and cultural contexts. The course provides an introduction to the discipline of art history. (GE2C)

ARTH 009. Survey of World Art After 1400. 4 Units.

A continuation of ARTH 007, this course surveys the history of world art from the fifteenth century to the present and considers major works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the applied arts. The course pays particular attention to situating works of art in their aesthetic, social, and cultural contexts and it also provides an introduction to the discipline of art history. (GE2C)

ARTH 087. Internship. 2-4 Units.

This off-campus internship offers non-classroom experiences/projects related to art history.

ARTH 089. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

This off-campus practicum offers non-classroom experiences/ projects related to art history.

ARTH 101. Design Thinking. 4 Units.

A survey of visual communication introduced by formal analysis of major works of design within the context of their time and influence on later works. This course highlights significant events in communication and design thinking from 1450 to the present with particular emphasis on the past century of design. (GE2C)

ARTH 108. Renaissance Art and Architecture. 4 Units.

Students examine the art (painting, sculpture and architecture) of the 15th and 16th centuries in Italy and Northern Europe. The course focuses on the major artists of the period who include Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Bramante, and Titian. The works of art are discussed in their artistic, historical and cultural contexts. (GE2C)

ARTH 110. 17th Century Art: Age of Rembrandt. 4 Units.

This course examines the masters of 17th century art. Major themes include the development of naturalism, a new interest in space, time and light, and relationship to artistic tradition.

ARTH 112. 19th Century European Art. 4 Units.

Major artists and artistic movements of the period are explored and include Neoclassicism, Romanticiscm, Realism and Impressionism. Students analyze the effects of gender upon representation and artistic practice, the effects of politics and class upon visual representation and the impact of urbanization. Painting, sculpture, photography, and architecture are considered. Art historical methods that include formalism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, and gender theory are explored. (GE2C)

ARTH 114. 20th Century Art and Film. 4 Units.

Major styles of the 20th century that include Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism, etc., and their appearance in visual arts, theater design, and film are explored. Students also evaluate how Western European artists borrowed imagery from other cultures and their relationship to colonialist concerns. Students also consider representations of the body and how this imagery relates to gender constructions. The effects of urbanization upon the artistic enterprise and the development of abstract and non-objective art are also considered. This course satisfies a requirement of Film Studies minor. (GE2C, GEND)

ARTH 116. Contemporary World Art 1945 to Present. 4 Units.

This course explores major artists, styles, and movements in world art from 1945 to the present. Gestural abstraction, Pop, Photo Realism, Happenings, Video, Performance, Conceptual and Political art as well as film are a few of the trends that are considered. Ever-expanding notions of what constitutes art in this pluralistic era is also examined. This course satisfies a requirement of the Film Studies minor. (FILM, GE2C, GEND)

ARTH 120. Chinese Art History. 4 Units.

An Introductory survey to the arts of Asia, from pre-historic to the present. Works of art are analyzed for their style, meanings, and original political and social contexts. How artists worked within Asian artistic traditions and how they absorbed influences from abroad will be emphasized. Prerequisite: none. (GE2C)

ARTH 122. Japanese Art History. 4 Units.

This introductory course surveys the visual arts of Japan from prehistoric to the present. Students analyze works of art for their style, meanings, and original political and social contexts. How artists worked within Japanese artistic tradition and how they absorbed influences from abroad is emphasized. (GE2C)

ARTH 130. Greek Art and Architecture. 4 Units.

This course offers an introductory survey of the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Students explore the stylistic development of Greek sculpture, painting and architecture and examine what this art can tell us about the ancient Greeks and how extensively it has influenced our modern world. This course is offered in alternate years.

ARTH 132. Roman Art and Architecture. 4 Units.

This introductory course surveys the art and architecture of ancient Etruria and Rome from 600 B.C.E to the 4th century C.E. Students explore the role of Roman art and architecture and its Etruscan influences in Roman life and history. Attention is given to examples of Roman influence that surround us today. This course is offered in alternate years.

ARTH 187. Internship. 2-4 Units.

This off-campus internship offers non-classroom experiences/projects related to art history.

ARTH 189. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

This off-campus, non-classroom practicum offers experiences/projects related to art history.

ARTH 191. Independent Study. 2-4 Units.

This course requires permission of faculty to enroll. Unless indicated, independent study courses may be counted only as electives.

ARTH 193. Special Topics. 4 Units.

ARTH 197. Independent Research. 2-4 Units.

Studio Art Courses

ARTS 003. Visual Arts Exploration. 4 Units.

This hands-on course is designed as an experiential studio/discussion course with emphasis upon acquiring practical skills and appreciation for the theoretical aspects of the creative process. This course explores two-dimensional and three-dimensional art forms such as drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture and ceramics. (GE2C)

ARTS 005. Drawing. 4 Units.

This foundational level hands-on course in drawing has an emphasis upon skill building and the visual and conceptual possibilities of art through drawing. A variety of projects and materials are used to investigate the medium's history, traditional approaches and expressive possibilities. (GE2C)

ARTS 007. Principles of 2-D Design and Color. 4 Units.

This foundational level hands-on course introduces the theoretical application of the elements and principles of 2-D design and the practical applications of color theory. Exercises in visual thinking and the use of traditional principles of composition and two-dimensional media are emphasized through sequential, skill building projects. (GE2C)

ARTS 009. Principles of 3-D Design. 4 Units.

This foundational level hands-on course introduces the theory and principles of 3-D design found in organic and man-made objects. Developing creative design solutions is emphasized through observations of nature architecture, visual art, industrial design and sequential, skill building projects. (GE2C)

ARTS 011. Digital Photography. 4 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the theory, process, and aesthetics of digital photography. Through a series of practical and conceptual assignments, students learn to work with digital cameras and a selection of software for image editing and printing. Students must provide their own digital cameras with fully manual exposure controls. Approximately $150 should be budgeted for other photographic materials that are not supplied by the University. Additional lab fees also apply. (FILM, GE2C)

ARTS 021. Life Drawing I. 4 Units.

This course places primary emphasis on the development of visual and perceptual skills relative to drawing the human body. This course covers exercises in the anatomical, structural, formal and expressive factors of figure drawing. Prerequisite: ARTS 005.

ARTS 023. Painting I. 4 Units.

This course introduces the concepts, methods and materials of oil painting. Drawing and painting skill, creative problem solving, artistic intent, personal imagery and aesthetic judgement will be developed in this course. (GE2C)

ARTS 037. Sculpture. 4 Units.

This introductory hands-on course explores the concepts and creative potential of sculpture. Through a sequence of applied assignments and exploration of a variety of media (clay, wood, plaster, metal, etc.) students learn to use materials and tools to create sculpture. (GE2C)

ARTS 057. Watercolor Painting. 4 Units.

Through demonstrations, readings, discussions and studio work this course introduces a variety of materials, techniques, traditions and contemporary uses of watercolor painting. A sequence of practical assignments incorporate aesthetic and conceptual development to build skill with the media and personal expression. Prerequisite: ARTS 005.

ARTS 059. Printmaking I. 4 Units.

This course is an introductory hands-on course that examines the historical and aesthetic development of the processes, materials and techniques of printmaking. A sequence of applied assignments incorporate the aesthetic and conceptual development to achieve basic mastery of the printmaking process.

ARTS 073. Freshman Seminar. 1 Unit.

This Freshman Seminar introduces the student majoring in either Studio Art or Graphic Design to issues related to professional practice, philosophical direction, and the creative process in the visual arts.

ARTS 075. Graphic Design I. 4 Units.

This course is a beginning studio course that gives students a broad and thorough exposure to the practice and profession of Graphic Design. (GE2C)

ARTS 077. Graphic Design II. 4 Units.

This intermediate level studio course expands on the skills and knowledge acquired in Graphic Design I. The course alternately explores theoretical and applied practical assignments that require problem solving attention to design development and multi-level thinking. Specific themes/topics for the course include visual grouping and hierarchy, visual perception, visual identity development and application of Gestalt theory. Prerequisite: ARTS 075 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 079. Typography I. 4 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the study of the letterform as a cornerstone of graphic design. It focuses on how typography can be used as a communicative device as well as a graphic, compositional and expressive element. Topics include letterform anatomy, letterform analysis, measuring systems, typographic identification, and practical issues of setting and using type effectively. Prerequisite: ARTS 005, ARTS 007 or ARTS 075 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 081. Typography II. 4 Units.

Students who enroll have the opportunity to apply the principles and concepts introduced in ARTS 079 to more complex typographic problems. Directions involving experimental and theoretical as well as practical and functional applications of type will be explored. A Macintosh laptop computer is required and lab fees apply. Prerequisite: ARTS 079 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 087. Internship. 1-4 Units.

The internship offers off-campus, non-classroom experience that applies to the studio arts in a professional context.

ARTS 089. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

The practicum offers on-campus, non-classroom experiences/projects that relate to discipline-specific studio arts.

ARTS 091. Print Media Graphics. 4 Units.

This course explores graphic design for publication. Assignments examine and develop creative solutions for graphic design and methods of publishing in print utilizing software applications in graphic design and contemporary publishing. Lab fees apply.

ARTS 095. Video I. 4 Units.

Video I is an introductory level course teaching the construction of time-based visual narratives. Students will develop projects using camera generated images and time-based software applications. Assignments focus on sequential storytelling, animation, video editing, and thematic development. Students must provide their own digital still cameras for this course. Approximately $100 is needed for other materials and equipment that are not supplied by the University. Additional lab fees. (FILM)

ARTS 103. Graphic Production. 4 Units.

This course examines methods and procedures of efficient production practices that include typographic issues, image adjustment, digital file format preparation and related technologies for the graphic design student. Lab fees apply. Prerequisite: ARTS 077 or ARTS 091 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 105. Web Design. 4 Units.

This intermediate level course teaches the development of web sites for commercial applications and artist's portfolios. Emphasis is placed upon effective approaches to the organization and design of web sites for self-promotion, employment, and e-commerce. Lab fees apply.

ARTS 107. Video II. 4 Units.

Video II is an advanced video course. Students will be assigned advanced and self-directed long-term projects, as well as learning more advanced software techniques for video editing. Approximately $100 should also be budgeted for other materials and equipment that are not supplied by the University. Prerequisite: ARTS 095.

ARTS 115. Animation. 4 Units.

This course challenges the student to create interpretive design solutions for complex interactive problems, which rely primarily upon motion and time to communicate visual ideas. Students explore these highly conceptual problems through use of digital technology. The course emphasizes dynamic, thoughtful, and appropriate visual communication solutions. Lab fees apply. Prerequisite: ARTS 091 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 121. Life Drawing II. 4 Units.

This course builds upon the experiences and skills achieved in Life Drawing I. The course emphasizes personal expression and advanced drawing from the nude figure. Prerequisite: ARTS 021.

ARTS 123. Painting II. 4 Units.

A studio course builds upon the experience and skills achieved in beginning drawing and painting. Instruction focuses upon problem solving using traditional and contemporary solutions and media. The development of personal style and expression is emphasized. Prerequisites: ARTS 005 and ARTS 023.

ARTS 125. Painting III. 4 Units.

This course is open to the advanced painting student. This course emphasizes conceptual development, setting and achieving personal goals. Emphasis is placed upon portfolio development and exhibition. Prerequisite: ARTS 123.

ARTS 127. Illustration. 4 Units.

This course examines the historical and applied application of visual art for publication and mass media. A series of practical assignments investigate a variety of sub-themes routinely practiced by illustrators such as advertising, editorial, scientific and book illustration. Prerequisites: ARTS 021 or ARTS 023 or by permission of the instructor.

ARTS 133. 3-D Studio I. 4 Units.

This course emphasizes intermediate skill building and conceptual development for three-dimensional art forms and it builds upon foundational skills of ceramics and sculpture, students explore contemporary trends, methods and materials applicable to 3-D studio practice. Prerequisite: ARTS 037 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 141. Photography II. 4 Units.

This intermediate course builds upon level one instruction in digital photography. This course introduces students to the photographic studio with practical instruction in studio lighting theory and techniques. The course also includes advanced camera and digital software applications for professional photographers who create photographs for editorial illustration, publication and exhibition. A laptop computer, preferably Mac, is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 011 or 095 or permission of the instructor. (FILM)

ARTS 145. Photography III. 4 Units.

This course is open to the advanced photography student. This course emphasizes conceptual development, setting and achieving personal goals. Emphasis is placed upon portfolio development and exhibition.

ARTS 151. Printmaking II. 4 Units.

This intermediate level course emphasizes mastery of a simple process introduced in ARTS 059. Students are required to conduct historical, technical and aesthetic research to provide background and rigor to their investigation and completed work. Prerequisite: ARTS 059.

ARTS 155. Printmaking III. 4 Units.

This course is open to the advanced printmaking student. This course emphasizes conceptual development, setting and achieving personal goals. Emphasis is placed upon portfolio development and exhibition.

ARTS 171. Graphic Design III. 4 Units.

This is an advanced level course with intensive involvement in project development. Emphasis is placed upon research and selecting design processes, client communication and professional presentation of work. Macintosh laptop computer required. Lab fees apply. Prerequisites: ARTS 077 or ARTS 081 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 173. Graphic Design Seminar. 4 Units.

This is the first of two capstone courses that emphasizes research in the fields of Graphic Design and Studio Art. It is an advanced level course in project and portfolio development. Prerequisite: ARTS 171 or permission of instructor. BFA majors in graphic design with junior standing.

ARTS 175. Senior Graphic Design Seminar. 4 Units.

This seminar is only open to BFA majors in graphic design with senior standing. This capstone course emphasizes research in the field of graphic design, and completion of a senior presentation and exhibition is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 173 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 181. Studio Art Seminar I. 4 Units.

ARTS 181 is an advanced level studio course that focuses on the development of research skills and interdisciplinary practice in the arts. Anchored in the tradition of rigorous studio practices, and enhanced by innovative approaches to creative thinking and research, interdisciplinary studio offers a context for practicing art in the contemporary/multidisciplinary arts environment. Interdisciplinary studies of drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, video and three-dimensional media are supported through close guidance and mcntorship by art and design faculty.

ARTS 181B. Interdisciplinary Studio. 3 Units.

ARTS 181A and ARTS 181B is an advanced level studio course that focuses on the development of research skills and interdisciplinary practice in the arts. Anchored in the tradition of rigorous studio practices, and enhanced by innovative approaches to creative thinking and research, interdisciplinary studio offers a context for practicing art in the contemporary/multidisciplinary arts environment. Interdisciplinary studies of drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, and three-dimensional media are supported through close guidance and mentorship by art and design faculty. Junior standing or permission of instructor.

ARTS 183. Professional Practices in the Arts. 3 Units.

This course prepares Bachelor of Fine Arts degree candidates for graduate study and/or entry level to a professional art career. This course involves reading/discussions, fieldtrips and practical assignments that emphasize professional identify, self-promotion, in addition to legal and business practices for artists.

ARTS 185. Studio Arts Capstone. 4 Units.

This is the capstone course for the BFA in Studio Arts. This course involves intensive studio work in a chosen concentration and it includes research, critiques and fieldtrips that define the activities undertaken during this course. Emphasis is placed upon preparing a senior thesis and a senior exhibition. Prerequisites: ARTS 181 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 187. Internship. 2-4 Units.

The internship offers off-campus, non-classroom experience that applies to the studio arts in a professional context.

ARTS 189. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

The practicum offers on-campus, non-classroom experiences/projects that relate to discipline-specific graphic studio arts.

ARTS 189A. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

The practicum offers on-campus, non-classroom experiences/projects that relate to discipline-specific graphic studio arts.

ARTS 189B. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

ARTS 189C. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

ARTS 189D. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

ARTS 191. Independent Study. 2-4 Units.

Enrolled by permission of the faculty only. Unless indicated, independent study courses may be counted only as electives. IS Contracts must be completed by student and faculty and approved by the department Chair. Prerequisites: Completion of foundations and upper division course work or permission of Department Chair.

ARTS 193. Special Topics. 2-4 Units.

ARTS 197. Undergraduate Research. 2-4 Units.

Undergraduate research in studio art is conducted in consultation with a faculty advisor. Student research focuses upon selected topics in the studio arts-related inquiries and advanced research in the field. Students who take this course must participate in the Pacific Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference (PURC) held each spring. Permission from Department Chair or supervising faculty.

Media X Courses

MEDX 011. Critical Media Making (Tools). 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the equipment, technologies, and applications of the allied arts of digital media and live performance. Through lectures, hands-on projects, and discussion, students will become familiar with the basic processes of working in digital and real world environments. Required for Media X majors.

MEDX 013. Media Literacies. 4 Units.

Students will be introduced to different ways of reading and analyzing media objects, learning to discern the conditions and limits of various media from multiple vantage points and methodological frameworks, including those of political economy, science, ecology, global history, and arts and letters. Students will also undertake various compositional “experiments” that will allow them to discover the surprising ways in which we, so far from expressing ourselves through our media, become instead impressed by them.

MEDX 021. Liveness in a Mediated Age. 4 Units.

Blending theory and history with hands-on experiments in the arts, this course introduces students to the importance of liveness in a mediated age. The digital and social media revolutions have transformed the ways in which live performance is inspired, created, and shared. This course examines both the historic roots of performance and its increasingly intermedial nature. The class also looks at how live performance uses theatrical, cinematic, and digital structures to create content and engage audiences.

MEDX 089. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

MEDX 093. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

MEDX 109. Capstone. 4 Units.

This course reflects the culmination of study and practice in the Media X major. In addition to refining students’ skills in research, writing, and collaborative and creative work, this course will engage them in thinking critically about individual and collective agency across the new media landscape. The capstone requires that students apply the readings and discussions about what constitutes the ‘digital revolution’ as they produce a research essay and collaborative portfolio project. Prerequisites: MEDX 011; MEDX 013; MEDX 021; Senior Standing.

MEDX 117. Film Production. 4 Units.

Students are introduced to the fundamental principles of motion picture production. Emphasis is on visual storytelling and auditory communication through demonstration, hands-on production and critical analysis. Students produce short films in small crews. Some equipment and materials are provided by the school, but approximately $300 should be budgeted for miscellaneous expenses and lab fees. (FILM, GE2C)

MEDX 118. Advanced Film Production. 4 Units.

This course is a production course focused on the collaborative process of creating professional-quality film and video content. Students will work in teams to produce short works throughout the semester. The primary focus in this class will be on telling a story visually. Students will learn advanced film production techniques (pre-production, production and post-production) based on current industry practices and standards. This course builds upon the film making knowledge of Introduction to Film Production. Perquisite: MEDX 117.

MEDX 119. Business of Film & Media. 4 Units.

Film and media are both an art and a business – a multi-billion-dollar business. To be successful in today’s film and media industry, students need to possess the business skills necessary to not only secure a hot property, but also navigate the rapidly evolving marketplace. The aim of this class is to give students a thorough overview of the business environment in which film and media productions are financed, developed, produced and distributed. Students will learn the “creative” side of producing for film and media, as well as the current business standards practiced in the industry in multiple formats and across a variety of platforms.

MEDX 187. Internship. 1-4 Units.

MEDX 189. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

MEDX 189A. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

MEDX 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

MEDX 193. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

MEDX 197. Independent Research. 1-4 Units.

Upon completion of the BFA in Art, students will be able to:

  1. Artistic and Design Process
    Solve communication problems, including the skills of problem identification, research and information gathering, analysis, generation of alternative solutions, prototyping and user testing, and evaluation of outcomes. 

  2. Respond to Contexts and Audiences
    Describe and respond to the audiences and contexts, which communication solutions must address, including recognition of the physical, cognitive, cultural, and social human factors that shape design decisions. 

  3. Solve Communication Problems
    Create and develop visual form in response to communication problems, including an understanding of principles of visual organization/ composition, information hierarchy, color theory and its applications, symbolic representation, typography, drawing, aesthetics, and the construction of meaningful messages in two and three dimensions. 

  4. Employ Art and Design Related Technologies
    Independently select and use appropriate art and design-related tools and technology to create, reproduce, and distribute coherent and meaningful visual messages. Relevant tools and technologies include, but are not limited to, drawing, illustration, photography, offset printing, time-based and interactive media (film, video, computer multimedia). 

  5. Professional Practices
    Independently, interactively as well as collaboratively engage in art/design professional practices to effectively organize and manage art/design projects  in studio, entrepreneurial and corporate setting. 

  6. Value Judgements
    Form and defend value judgements about art and design including communicating key concepts, visual approaches and requirements to professionals and laypersons related to projects and practice. 

  7. Apply History and Theory
    Apply history, current issues, processes, and directions in the art and graphic design field to projects. 

  8. Doing (Good) Art and Design
    Apply ethical reasoning to create sustainable, and socially and environmentally responsible art and design solutions. 

Learning Outcomes for Media X

  1. Create Multilayered Content. Synthesize and apply knowledge from the liberal arts to produce culturally relevant, effective content.
  2. Integratively Apply Theories. Integrate and apply media and performance theories in multiple media and illustrate technical fluency, including computer programming.
  3. Articulate Cultural Frameworks. Articulate an understanding of economic, political, and cultural differences and hierarchies that influence global artistic production and media practices.
  4. Adapt Across Platforms. Adapt and translate content across multiple media and performance platforms using historical, theoretical, and technical knowledge to make and defend creative decisions.
  5. Manage Creative Projects. Exercise self-initiative and project management techniques congruent with a field characterized by high levels of autonomy, independence, interdependence, and entrepreneurship.
  6. Practice Interprofessional Collaboration. Demonstrate knowledge of expected and alternative forms of collaboration in the professional media and performance industries when creating and executing collaborative projects
  7. Demonstrate Entrepreneurship and Professional Development.  Formulate career options and demonstrate activities that connect with emerging opportunities and are congruent with the student’s career interests and strengths. 

Art, Media, Performance, and Design Faculty

Kevin Pontuti, Media X Director, 2017, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania, 1990; M.F.A., Syracuse University, 1993, kpontuti@pacific.edu

Brett DeBoer, Department Chair, Associate Professor , 1999, BFA, University of Northern Colorado, 1977; MS, Parsons School of Design, 1985; MFA, Rochester Institute of Technology, 1989, bdeboer@pacific.edu, (209) 946-3097, https://brettdeboerdesign.com, ART 112

Deanna Hunt, Visiting Lecturer, MFA, Portland State University, dhunt@PACIFIC.EDU, https://www.linkedin.com/in/deanna-hunt-8638435b/, 108

Sand Kakuda, Visiting Lecturer, MA Art History; San Jose State University, neoclassy@gmail.com, 209.946.2754, 202

Marie Lee, Associate Professor, 2009, BA, Michigan State University, 2000; BFA Colorado State University, 2002; MFA, Colorado State University, 2005, mlee2@pacific.edu, (209) 946-7323, ART 120

Michael Leonard, Visiting Lecturer, MA Johns Hopkins University, Medical And Biological Illustration; BA Towson University, Fine Art , mleonard@PACIFIC.EDU, 209-946-2243, https://www.meleonarddesign.com, 105

Jennifer Little, Associate Professor, 2005, BFA, Washington University, 2001; MFA, University of Texas, Austin, 2005, jlittle@pacific.edu, (209) 946-3175, ART 111

Jill Vasillef, Visiting Lecturer, MFA, Painting—Bard College, BFA Fine Art, Parsons School of Design, jvasileff@PACIFIC.EDU, 209.401.5724, jillvasileff.com, 101