Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences

http://www.pacific.edu/Academics/Schools-and-Colleges/College-of-the-Pacific/Academics/Departments-and-Programs/Health-Exercise-and-Sport-Sciences.html
Phone: (209) 946-2209
Location: Main Gym

J. Mark VanNess, Chair (Health & Exercise Science)
 

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Master of Arts
(see Graduate Catalog for information)

Majors Offered

Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences (BA), with concentrations in:

  • Health & Exercise Science
  • Human Performance

Health and Exercise Science (BS)

Minors Offered

Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences

Mission

The mission of the University of the Pacific’s Department of Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences is to provide student-centered instruction, offer a progressive, dynamic, cross-disciplinary curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences tradition, and attract and sustain students and faculty of diversity and quality. 

Degrees in Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences

The Department of Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences offers programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Arts degrees. The purpose of a Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences degree is to educate and prepare students for a variety of careers in the fields grounded in human movement.

Coursework provides students with a foundation of knowledge and understanding about the concepts within the discipline. Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences majors must successfully complete one of the following concentrations: health and exercise science,  human performance, or PE, coaching & fitness..  All degree options culminate with internships or practical coursework in clinical and applied settings.

Upon completion of a degree in the Department of Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences, it is expected that students have the capacity to: obtain, read, and interpret important information from health, exercise & sport sciences literature; write clearly, critically and persuasively; prepare and deliver presentations effectively; work and collaborate in groups toward a common goal; design and conduct research studies using appropriate methodologies; identify and apply ethical standards to the current issues in a selected track/major.

Facilities

The Department of Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences has the following facilities for use in its programs: a Human Physiology laboratory, a Human Performance and Biomechanics laboratory, a Kinesiology laboratory, an Athletic Training laboratory, a computer lab, Main Gymnasium, and Baun Fitness Center.

Bachelor of Science in Health and Exercise Science

The Bachelor of Science degree in health and exercise science prepares students for careers and/or graduate study in areas such as medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, health sciences, nutrition and exercise physiology.  The program is science based and human oriented.  The study of human movement comprises understanding of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, immune and metabolic systems.  Foundational sciences as well as exercise physiology, kinesiology and clinical opportunities provide the underpinning of the program.  The majority of the major classes involve experiential laboratory components to illustrate and encourage the application of theoretical concepts.  Opportunities for taking specialty elective classes are available to tailor the undergraduate major for specific graduate interests.

Students must complete a minimum of 120 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Health and Exercise Science.

I. General Education Requirements

For more details, see General Education

Minimum 28 units and 9 courses that include:

A. CORE Seminars (2 courses)

CORE 001Problem Solving & Oral Comm3
CORE 002Writing and Critical Thinking4

Note: 1) CORE Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer credits taken after high school are exempt from both CORE seminars. Students participating in the First Year Honors Program should complete an honors section of CORE 001 regardless of the number of college transfer units completed. 

B. Breadth Requirement (7 courses, at least 3 units each)

At least one course from each of the following areas:
Artistic Process & Creation
Civic & Global Responsibility
Language & Narratives
Quantitative Reasoning
Scientific Inquiry
Social Inquiry
World Perspectives & Ethics

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline can be used to meet the Breadth Requirement.

C. Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

All students must complete Diversity and Inclusion coursework (at least 3 units)

Note: 1) Diversity and Inclusion courses can also be used to meet the breadth category requirements, or major or minor requirements.

D. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:
Writing
Quantitative Analysis (Math)

Note: 1) Failure to satisfy the fundamental skills requirements by the end of four semesters of full-time study at the University is grounds for academic disqualification.

II. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 60 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline.  (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.).

III. Major Requirements

Minimum 76 units that include

HESP 129Exercise Physiology4
HESP 133Kinesiology4
HESP 135Nutrition and Metabolism4
HESP 147Muscle Physiology4
HESP 157The Clinician in Health and Exercise Science4
HESP 177Cardiovascular Physiology4
HESP 180Epidemiology4
HESP 187Internship in Health and Exercise Science4
BIOL 051Principles of Biology5
BIOL 061Principles of Biology5
BIOL 170Human Anatomy5
BIOL 180Human Physiology5
CHEM 025General Chemistry5
CHEM 027General Chemistry5
PHYS 023General Physics I5
PHYS 025General Physics II5
Three HESP Electives *9-12

Bachelor of Arts Major in Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences Concentration in Health and Exercise Science

The Health and Exercise Science concentration is scientifically based and human oriented. It prepares students for careers and/or further graduate study in health and fitness related areas such as medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, nutrition and exercise/work physiology. A primary goal of this concentration is to provide a scholarly environment in classes and laboratories that supports and encourages the application of theoretical concepts. Students study and apply principles relevant to the rehabilitation and enhancement of human performance.

In addition to completing the Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences, Health and Exercise Science students must successfully complete a series of courses within the department and courses drawn from the life and physical sciences.

Students must complete a minimum of 120 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree with a major in health, exercise and sport sciences with a concentration in health and exercise science.

I. General Education Requirements

For more details, see General Education

Minimum 28 units and 9 courses that include:

A. CORE Seminars (2 courses)

CORE 001Problem Solving & Oral Comm3
CORE 002Writing and Critical Thinking4

Note: 1) CORE Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer credits taken after high school are exempt from both CORE seminars. Students participating in the First Year Honors Program should complete an honors section of CORE 001 regardless of the number of college transfer units completed. 

B. Breadth Requirement (7 courses, at least 3 units each)

At least one course from each of the following areas:
Artistic Process & Creation
Civic & Global Responsibility
Language & Narratives
Quantitative Reasoning
Scientific Inquiry
Social Inquiry
World Perspectives & Ethics

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline can be used to meet the Breadth Requirement.

C. Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

All students must complete Diversity and Inclusion coursework (at least 3 units)

Note: 1) Diversity and Inclusion courses can also be used to meet the breadth category requirements, or major or minor requirements.

D. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:
Writing
Quantitative Analysis (Math)

Note: 1) Failure to satisfy the fundamental skills requirements by the end of four semesters of full-time study at the University is grounds for academic disqualification.

II. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

III. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 60 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

IV. Major Requirements:

Minimum 60 units that include:

HESP 129Exercise Physiology4
HESP 133Kinesiology4
HESP 157The Clinician in Health and Exercise Science4
HESP 180Epidemiology4
HESP 187Internship in Health and Exercise Science4
BIOL 051Principles of Biology5
BIOL 061Principles of Biology5
BIOL 170Human Anatomy5
BIOL 180Human Physiology5
CHEM 025General Chemistry5
CHEM 027General Chemistry5
Five HESP Electives (Five additional courses excluding HESP 023, HESP 025)12-16

Career Options for Health and Exercise Science

Employment opportunities following completion of the health and exercise science concentration include cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, cardiac disease prevention-rehabilitation, work toward advanced degrees in allied health sciences such as physican assistant, nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy and medicine or sports medicine. Health and Exercise Science is in part a self-contained program as curricular support for Pacific’s Physical Therapy Graduate program.

Pre-Physical Therapy (Optional)

Students in the Health and Exercise Science concentration who are interested in pursuing graduate studies in Physical Therapy are advised to complete the following courses:

MATH 035Elementary Statistical Inference (or similar course)3
PHYS 023General Physics I5
PHYS 025General Physics II5
PSYC 017Abnormal and Clinical Psychology4
PSYC 031Introduction to Psychology4
HESP 061Medical Terminology4

Students are strongly advised to check with individual graduate programs for specific requirements.

Bachelor of Arts Major in Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences Concentration in Human Performance

The Health and Exercise Science concentration is scientifically based and human oriented. It prepares students for careers and/or further graduate study for health clubs, corporate fitness/wellness, sport performance, nutrition and exercise/work physiology. A primary goal of this concentration is to provide a scholarly environment in classes and laboratories that supports and encourages the application of theoretical concepts. Students study and apply principles relevant to enhancement of human and sport performance.

In addition to completing the Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences, students that study Human Performance must successfully complete a series of courses within the department and courses drawn from the life and physical sciences.

Students must complete a minimum of 120 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree with a major in health, exercise and sport sciences with a concentration in human performance.

I. General Education Requirements

For more details, see General Education

Minimum 28 units and 9 courses that include:

A. CORE Seminars (2 courses)

CORE 001Problem Solving & Oral Comm3
CORE 002Writing and Critical Thinking4

Note: 1) CORE Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer credits taken after high school are exempt from both CORE seminars. Students participating in the First Year Honors Program should complete an honors section of CORE 001 regardless of the number of college transfer units completed. 

B. Breadth Requirement (7 courses, at least 3 units each)

At least one course from each of the following areas:
Artistic Process & Creation
Civic & Global Responsibility
Language & Narratives
Quantitative Reasoning
Scientific Inquiry
Social Inquiry
World Perspectives & Ethics

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline can be used to meet the Breadth Requirement.

C. Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

All students must complete Diversity and Inclusion coursework (at least 3 units)

Note: 1) Diversity and Inclusion courses can also be used to meet the breadth category requirements, or major or minor requirements.

D. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:
Writing
Quantitative Analysis (Math)

Note: 1) Failure to satisfy the fundamental skills requirements by the end of four semesters of full-time study at the University is grounds for academic disqualification.

II. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

III. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 60 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

IV. Major Requirements:

Minimum 60 units that include:

HESP 129Exercise Physiology4
HESP 133Kinesiology4
HESP 135Nutrition and Metabolism4
HESP 143Prevention and Acute Care of Injury and Illness4
HESP 157The Clinician in Health and Exercise Science4
HESP 180Epidemiology4
HESP 182Exercise Testing and Prescription4
BIOL 011Human Anatomy and Physiology4-5
or BIOL 061 Principles of Biology
CHEM 023Elements of Chemistry4
or CHEM 025 General Chemistry
Five HESP Electives:20
Health and Wellness for Life
Health and Exercise Science Law
Psycho-Social Aspects of Health Care
Muscle Physiology
Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis I
Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis II
Motor Development and Learning
Biomechanics of Human Movement
Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation
Cardiovascular Physiology
Special Topics
Independent Research

Career Options for Human Performance

The Human Performance concentration is for students pursuing careers in human and sport performance, wellness/fitness, life coaching, health education or graduate _programs in exercise science or nutrition.

Pre-Athletic Training (Optional)

Students pursing the Bachelor of Arts in Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences with a concentration in Human Performance who are interested in pursuing graduate studies in Athletic Training are advised to complete the following courses:

MATH 035Elementary Statistical Inference (or similar course)3
BIOL 061Principles of Biology5
BIOL 170Human Anatomy5
BIOL 180Human Physiology5
PHYS 023General Physics I5
PSYC 031Introduction to Psychology4
HESP 041Health and Wellness for Life4
HESP 061Medical Terminology4

Students are strongly advised to check with individual graduate programs for specific requirements.

Minor in Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences

The minor in health, exercise, and sport sciences provides students outside the major with opportunity to gain detailed exposure to one specific sub-discipline of the field. The minor is intended to complement a student's major course of study, but does not provide the depth of the major curriculum. To earn a minor in health, exercise, and sport sciences, students must complete a minimum of 20 units and 5 courses with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0.

Minor Requirements 

1. Under the supervision of an advisor, students must select 5 or more complimentary courses that corresponds to one of the following content areas of Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences: Exercise Physiology, Heath & Exercise Science, Strength & Conditioning.

2. The unit total for all courses must meet or exceed 20 units.

3. Lower division courses (i.e., courses below the 100 level) may not count toward the minor.

Hlth, Exercise & Sprt Sci Courses

HESP 010. Departmental Seminar. 1 Unit.

This class provides first year students with information relevant to the study of Health and Exercise Science at the University of the Pacific. The class has three parts: 1) About HESP; a summary of the programs, courses and an introduction to extracurricular activities within the department. 2) About You; an exploration of individual strengths, weaknesses and learning styles to improve collegiate studies. 3) About Pacific; introductions to campus programs and people that support learning, career building and health. Goals and Objectives: Each student develops academic goals by understanding themselves, knowing required curriculum and support offered by professors and support staff at the University. Students will plan coursework and understand available opportunities and programs that aide in the process.

HESP 023. First Aid. 1 Unit.

This course is designated to help the student achieve Red Cross certification in Standard First Aid and CPR. In addition to developing safety awareness, the student obtains a body of knowledge and practice skills that relate to proper medical emergency responses. Lab fee is required.

HESP 025. Advanced First Aid. 2 Units.

Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care reviews concepts and theories in Standard First Aid and includes more sophisticated skill development: triage, extrication, traction splinting and water rescue. Includes CPR instruction. Standard First Aid is not a prerequisite although it is recommended that students have some basic first aid knowledge. Lab fee is required.

HESP 041. Health and Wellness for Life. 4 Units.

This course presents general principles of health and wellness with a focus on the relationship of exercise and nutrition to cardiovascular health, chronic diseases, body composition, and psycho-social well-being. Students apply course content to their individual circumstances. Each student develops an individualized health plan that addresses physical fitness, nutrition, weight management and stress management. Lab fee is required. (GE3C)

HESP 043. Health Education for Teachers. 3 Units.

This course examines objectives from the California Health Education Framework, the health status of youth, at-risk students, components of comprehensive school health education, the role of the teacher in school health services, and special health concerns of today’s youth. It is designed to satisfy the Commission for Teacher Credentialing requirement for health education and includes mandated information on nutrition, alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.

HESP 045. Nutrition for Health. 4 Units.

This is a basic introductory nutrition course designed to help students make healthy diet choices. This course includes an examination of the digestion and absorption of nutrients, and an overview of the biochemistry of the macronutrients; carbohydrate, lipid, protein, and water; and micronutrients; vitamins and minerals. The role of nutrients in disease processes such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and aging as well as diet planning, production of food, and control of energy balance are covered. Students may not receive credit for this course if they take either BIOL 045 or HESP 135. (GE3C)

HESP 061. Medical Terminology. 4 Units.

This course provides a foundation in medical terminology for students in allied health curriculums who need to know the language on health care. Students are introduced to the major word parts used in the formation of medical terms which include suffixes, prefixes, and combining forms. Common words associated with the systems of the body are also studied. Instruction takes place online through the Blackboard Learning System. There are no prerequisites for this course.

HESP 087. Fieldwork. 2-4 Units.

This course is laboratory work in school and community agencies. The course is open to non-majors by permission of instructor. Grading is Pass/No credit only.

HESP 089. Practicum. 1 or 2 Unit.

The practicum offers non-classroom experiences in activities related to Health, Exericse and Sport Sciences, under conditions determined by the appropriate faculty member. HESP 189 represents advanced practicum work involving increased independence and responsibility. Enrollment is limited to eight units maximum of 089/189A, B, C, D, H, J, K offerings and no category within a course may be repeated for credit. A list of specific courses follows.

HESP 089B. Practicum: Athletic Training I. 4 Units.

This clinical education course in the field of athletic training incorporates an experiential learning environment designed to prepare students for a career in athletic training. Basic skills are introduced within the daily operations of the athletic training room and in the care of athletes. Criteria for progression must be met before enrolling in subsequent practicum course. Athletic Training majors or permission of instructor is required.

HESP 089D. Prcticum: Exercise Physiology. 2 Units.

Non-classroom experiences in activities related to sport medicine, under conditions determined by the appropriate faculty member. HESP 189 represents practicum work involving increased independence and responsibility. Enrollment is limited to six units maximum of HESP 089/189A, B, C, D offerings and no category within a course may be repeated for credit. Grading is Pass/No Credit only.

HESP 089J. Practicum: Kinesiology. 2 Units.

Non-classroom experiences in activities related to Sport Medicine, under conditions determined by the appropriate faculty member. HESP 189 represents practicum work involving increased independence and responsibility. Enrollment is limited to six units maximum of HESP 089/189A, B, C, D offerings and no category within a course may be repeated for credit. Grading is Pass/No Credit only.

HESP 089K. Practicum: Athletic Training II. 4 Units.

This is the second in a series of four consecutive clinical education courses in the field of Athletic Training. The course incorporates an experiential learning environment designed to prepare students for a career in Athletic Training. Advanced Athletic Training knowledge and skills will also be introduced within the daily operations of the Athletic Training Facility and your Clinical Assignment and in the care of patients.

HESP 110. Health and Exercise Science Law. 4 Units.

This course examines legal issues and responsibilities relevant to health and exercise science professionals. This course is divided into two parts. Part I introduces basic concepts of the legal system and reviews general legal principles of tort and contract law. Part II focuses upon specific topics to which legal principles and risk management strategies apply. This course is taught combining lecture, class discussions, and experientially based assignments designed to develop the ability to practically apply circumstance to the law and risk management planning. In-class oral arguments using relevant case law, review of local facilities and programs, and legal observations in San Joaquin County courtrooms will supplement course content and offer students “hands on” learning opportunities.

HESP 129. Exercise Physiology. 4 Units.

This course is designed to introduce Health and Exercise Science students to core physiological concepts relevant to acute and long-term adaptations to the stress of exercise. An overview of metabolic, cardiovascular, respiratory, and skeletal muscle adaptations will be discussed along with special topics such as environmental stressors, obesity, and nutrition. Outside laboratory assignments are carried out for the purpose of applying lecture to practice and providing “hands on” opportunities to develop basic competencies in the interpretation of laboratory testing in exercise physiology. Lab fee required.

HESP 131. Assessment and Evaluation. 4 Units.

This course is the development of competencies of Health, Exericse and Sport Sciences majors for the design and implementation of procedures to appropriately measure and evaluate students, clients and/or programs. Basic data acquisition methods and statistical analysis techniques are presented. A Lab fee is required.

HESP 133. Kinesiology. 4 Units.

This course is a functional study of musculoskeletal anatomy and its relationship to human movement, posture, exercise prescription, and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: BIOL 011 or BIOL 051 or BIOL 061 or permission of instructor, and lab fee required.

HESP 135. Nutrition and Metabolism. 4 Units.

This course provides a thorough study of the principles of nutrition as they relate to health of individuals who participate in sports or physical activity. Topics include calculating energy balance and the role of carbohydrates, lipid, protein, vitamins, minerals and water in sports performance. The application of these topics for optimal metabolic functioning to a variety of physical activities is also presented. Prerequisites: HESP 129; BIOL 011 or BIOL 061.

HESP 137. Psycho-Social Aspects of Health Care. 4 Units.

Students study comprehensive, integrated coverage of psychosocial topics in healthcare involving clients, families, and other caregivers affected by pathology, impairment, functional limitations, and/or disability. This course will have a broad coverage of topics in healthcare including multicultural issues, spirituality, chronic condition, abuse/neglect, and PTSD. Emphasis will be placed on current, evidence-based literature, connecting theory to practice.

HESP 141. Sport, Culture and U.S. Society. 4 Units.

This course is designed to explore the relationship between sport, culture and society in both the USA and the broader global world. Students learn to critically examine a wide range of topics that include, but not limited to, sport and gender, sport and race, global sports worlds, drugs and violence in sport, sport and politics and the crime-sport nexus. The intention of this course is to develop the student’s sociological imagination and encourage the student to think critically about the role sport plays in the development of societies, ideologies and everyday life. (DVSY, ETHC, GE1B, GEND)

HESP 143. Prevention and Acute Care of Injury and Illness. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of the field of Athletic Training, its organization, and the responsibilities of a Certified Athletic Trainer (AT) as part of the sports medicine team. Instruction emphasizes prevention, recognition, and immediate care of injuries and illnesses associated with physical activity. This course is recommended for freshmen.

HESP 145. Therapeutic Modalities. 4 Units.

This course is a lecture and laboratory experience designed to expose the student to the theory, principles, techniques and application of therapeutic modalities pertaining to the treatment of athletic or activity related injuries. Topics include discussions of the physiological effects, indications, contra indications, dosage and maintenance of each modality. Recommended: BIOL 081. Lab fee is required. Junior standing.

HESP 146. Health, Disease, and Pharmacology. 4 Units.

This course is an in-depth exploration of physical, mental, and social health with specific emphasis on recognizing the signs, symptoms, and predisposing conditions associated with the progression of specific illnesses and diseases as they relate to the physically active individual. Students also develop an awareness of the indications, contraindications, precautions, and interactions of medications used to treat those illnesses and diseases.

HESP 147. Muscle Physiology. 4 Units.

This course is focused on skeletal muscle physiology. Topics include the structure and function of muscle tissue, protein synthesis, cell signaling cascades, the specificity of adaptation, enzymes and their roles in metabolism, endocrine function, anabolic steroids, muscle damage, inflammatory physiology, neuromuscular principles (e.g., size principle), and the mechanisms of muscle fatigue. Laboratory assignments focus on skeletal muscle testing and evaluation. Prerequisite: HESP 129 and upper-divison class standing. Lab fee required.

HESP 149. Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis I. 3 Units.

This course presents an in-depth study of musculoskeletal assessment of the lower extremity, thoracic and lumbar spine for the purpose of identifying (a) common acquired or congenital risk factors that would predispose an individual to injury and/or (b) musculoskeletal injury common to athletics or physical activity. Students receive instruction in obtaining a medical history, performing a visual observation, palpating bones and soft tissues, and performing appropriate special tests for injuries and conditions of the foot, ankle, lower leg, knee, thigh, hip, pelvis, lumbar and thoracic spine. This course is directed toward students who pursue athletic training and/or physical therapy professions. Prerequisite: HESP 133 or BIOL 071, and a lab fee is required.

HESP 150. Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis II. 3 Units.

This course presents an in-depth study of musculoskeletal assessment of the upper extremity, cervical spine, head and face for the purpose of identifying (a) common acquired or congenital risk factors that would predispose an individual to injury and/or (b) musculoskeletal injury common to athletics or physical activity. Students receive instruction in obtaining a medical history, performing a visual observation, palpating bones and soft tissues, and performing appropriate special tests for injuries and conditions of the shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, fingers, thumb, cervical spine, head, and face. This course is directed toward students who pursue athletic training and/or physical therapy professions. Prerequisites: HESP 149; HESP 133 or BIOL 071. Lab fee is required.

HESP 151. Elementary Physical Education. 3 Units.

This course is designed to prepare students for employment in an elementary school setting and provide them with the tools necessary to formulate and implement a comprehensive elementary PE experience for all students. Participants learn a wide range of teaching skills that facilitate the ability to create a quality active learning environment in elementary PE. Students explore effective teaching and assessment strategies, classroom management skills, the use of constructive feedback, the negotiation of diverse classrooms and the development of appropriate student learning outcomes. Students also are introduced to the subject matter of elementary PE and will undertake several teaching episodes. This course encourages students to engage in reflexive teaching practices, develop physically educated young people, maximize student involvement and enjoyment in PE and integrate core curriculum subject matter into PE lessons.

HESP 155. Motor Development and Learning. 3 Units.

This course examines aspects of skilled performance and motor learning from a developmental perspective. It is concerned with the major principles of human performance and skill learning, the progressive development of a conceptual model of human actions and the development of skill through training and practice. Topics include human information processing, decision-making and movement planning, perceptual processes relevant to human movement, production of movement skills, measurement of learning, practice design, preparation, organization, and scheduling,; use of feedback, in addition to the application of motor learning principles to sport, physical education, industrial and physical therapy settings. Fieldwork requires clearance for local school districts (clear LiveScan fingerprint screening and negative TB test results).

HESP 157. The Clinician in Health and Exercise Science. 4 Units.

This course integrates theory and practice and requires students to develop a research topic, consistent with an explicitly and narrowly defined area of interest. Permission of the instructor is required.

HESP 159. Health Optimizing Physical Education. 3 Units.

This course introduces prospective physical education teachers to the principles and components of health-related fitness, appropriate curriculum for K-12 programming, comprehensive school and community-based physical activity planning, effective teaching principles, behavior change strategies, and advocacy approaches of physical activity and fitness. Prerequisites: HESP 131 and HESP 151.

HESP 160. Principles of Coaching. 3 Units.

This course is designed as an introduction to the principles of athletic coaching for modern day athletes. Emphasis is on a holistic approach to the theories, knowledge, and practices of coaching sport as prescribed by the National Standards for Sport Coaches. This course will explore coaching at various levels. Topics will include developing a coaching philosophy, evaluating theories in student-athlete motivation, understanding team dynamics, leadership, administration responsibilities, and improving player performance.

HESP 161. Biomechanics of Human Movement. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the biomechanics of human movement and the analytic procedures and techniques for subsequent application in the sport sciences and related fields. The course includes a review of basic functional/mechanical human anatomy and kinesiology. Outcome objectives are an understanding of mechanical principles governing human movement, skill in use of a variety of measurement techniques commonly applied in biomechanics, an ability to analyze motor skill performance via cinematographic/ computer methodologies and skill in prescriptively communicating results of analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 011 or BIOL 051 or BIOL 061 or permission of instructor, and a lab fee is required.

HESP 163. Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation. 4 Units.

This course is an application of the theory and principles associated with therapeutic exercise and the application of various rehabilitation techniques and procedures during the course of an athlete’s rehabilitation to attain normal range of motion, strength, flexibility, and endurance. Prerequisite: BIOL 071; HESP 133 or permission of instructor, and a lab fee is required.

HESP 173. Health Care Management and Professional Development. 4 Units.

This course is an in-depth study of the management of health care organizations related to finances, facilities, equipment, organizations structures, medical/insurance records, risk management, human relations, and personnel. Practical and conceptual skills are taught to help students focus on more efficient health care delivery. Also covered is the development of leadership skills, future trends in health care management, guidelines for designing effective work groups and managing conflict.

HESP 177. Cardiovascular Physiology. 4 Units.

This course seeks to fulfill two main objectives: 1) to establish a foundational understanding of clinical cardiovascular physiology and 2) to be able to perform and interpret cardiopulmonary exercise tests to examine cardiac, metabolic and respiratory pathology. Prerequisite: HESP 129 and upper division class standing. Lab fee required.

HESP 179. Introduction to Research. 4 Units.

This course covers the rationale for and status of professional research; research designs and their applicability to students’ disciplines, review, critique and synthesis of selected literature; development of research proposal and pretest of instrument.

HESP 180. Epidemiology. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of epidemiology. It explores the history, concepts, and methods of epidemiologic investigation. The statistical models taught in this class include the receiver operating characteristic curve, chi-square test, t-test, binary logistic regression, and linear regression. Students will learn to develop research designs that employ these tests and will be able to conduct them to evaluate patient care, quantify risk, and understand the patterns of illness and disease in populations.

HESP 182. Exercise Testing and Prescription. 4 Units.

This course is primarily designed to provide students with the hands-on training and theoretical background to competently assess levels of wellness/fitness in an “apparently healthy” (i.e. low risk) adult population. The topics and skills addressed include health screening protocols/risk stratification, use of Informed Consent documents, as well as measurement protocols for the health-related components of fitness (i.e. cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness, flexibility, body composition). These skills are then used to prescribe lifestyle and/or exercise modifications that result in individual progress toward a desired goal. Prerequisite: HESP 129.

HESP 187. Internship in Health and Exercise Science. 4 Units.

This course provides an opportunity for qualifying students to work in an area of Health and Exercise Science that interests them. Prerequisites: HESP 157, GPA 2.0, no grade below “C-“ in major, and approval of course supervisor.

HESP 187F. Internship. 1-4 Units.

HESP 187G. Internship. 1-4 Units.

HESP 189. Practicum: Coaching. 1 or 2 Unit.

The practicum offers non-classroom experiences in activities related to Sports Sciences, under conditions determined by the appropriate faculty member. HESP 189 represents advanced practicum work involving increased independence and responsibility. Enrollment is limited to eight units maximum of HESP 089/189A, B, C, D, H, J, K offerings and no category within a course may be repeated for credit. A list of specific courses follows. Grading option is Pass/No Credit only.

HESP 189B. Practicum: Athletic Training III. 4 Units.

This is a clinical education course in the field of athletic training. It incorporates an experiential learning environment designed to prepare students for a career in athletic training. Advanced skills are introduced within the daily operations of the athletic training room and in the care of the athletes. Criteria for progression must be met before enrolling in subsequent practicum course. Prerequisite: HESP 089K.

HESP 189C. Practicum: Biomechanics. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sport Medicine. See HESP 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations. Grading option is Pass/No Credit only.

HESP 189D. Practicum: Exercise Physiology. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sport Medicine. See HESP 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations. Grading option is Pass/No Credit only.

HESP 189F. Practicum: Coaching. 2 Units.

Students are assigned to an intercollegiate or interscholastic sports team for the semester and participate in practice sessions throughout the specific sport season. Written guidelines are developed cooperatively by the supervisor, coach and student. Prerequisites: HESP 139 and HESP 155.

HESP 189H. Practicum: Sports Law. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sport Medicine. See HESP 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations. Grading option is Pass/No Credit only.

HESP 189J. Practicum: Kinesiology. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sport Medicine. See HESP 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations. Prerequisite: HESP 133 with a "C-" or better. Grading option is Pass/No Credit only.

HESP 189K. Practicum: Athletic Training IV. 4 Units.

This is the fourth in a series of four consecutive clinical education courses in the field of Athletic Training. The course incorporates an experiential learning environment designed to prepare students for a career in Athletic Training. Advanced Athletic Training knowledge and skills will also be introduced within the daily operations of the Athletic Training Facility and your Clinical Assignment and in the care of patients. Prerequisite: HESP 189B.

HESP 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

HESP 193. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

HESP 195. Ethical Issues in Sport. 3 Units.

The primary goal of this course is to enhance student awareness regarding their values, their evolving moral and ethical codes, and the ways of addressing moral problems. Students examine various ethical theories and questions encountered in the field of Sport Sciences. As part of this course, students need to identify necessary information from various sub-disciplines in order to make professional and ethical decisions. Senior standing.

HESP 197. Independent Research. 1-4 Units.

Health and Exercise Science

  1. Meet all requirements to enter graduate programs in medicine or allied health sciences, particularly physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physician assistant programs.
  2. Apply fundamental concepts of exercise biology to fulfilling health-related goals of a physical training program
  3. Use concepts, language, and major theories of exercise physiology to describe acute responses to exercise and chronic adaptations to exercise training
  4. Become reflective pre-professionals that are knowledgeable consumers of exercise science research in order to prescribe evidence-based exercise programs and be familiar with common measurement techniques and equipment in exercise science.
  5. Develop the skills necessary to plan, implement, and evaluate effective and individualized exercise- or health-related exercise programs.
  6. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills appropriate for success and advancement in the fields of health and exercise sciences.

Fitness, Coaching and Wellness

  1. Identify, apply and evaluate discipline-specific scientific and theoretical concepts critical to the development of physically educated individuals
  2. Create and implement training programs consistent with the goals, skills, and capability of clientele. 
  3. Apply and evaluate effective communication and skills and strategies to enhance client engagement and learning
  4. Demonstrate mastery of current technologies to enhance client engagement and improvement
  5. Utilize assessments and reflection to foster improvement and inform instructional design and modification.
  6. Demonstrate dispositions essential to becoming effective professionals
  7. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary for competent movement performance and health-enhancing fitness for persons of all skill levels.

Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences Faculty

J. Mark VanNess, Professor, Chair, 1999, BS, Wheaton College, 1990; MS, California State University, Sacramento, 1993; PhD. Florida State University, 1997., mvanness@pacific.edu

Courtney Jensen, Assistant Professor, Graduate Director, 2015, Ph.D., cjensen1@pacific.edu, pacificlectures.com

Peter Wang, AT program director, MPH, pwang@pacific.edu

Margaret E. (Peg) Ciccolella, Professor, 1985, BA, University of Colorado, 1970; MS, Brigham Young University, 1972; EdD, 1978; JD, Humphreys College of Law, 1993., mciccolella@pacific.edu

Sharon West-Sell, Visiting Assistant Professor, 1999, Ph.D., swest@pacific.edu

Amber Kavehkar, Adjunct Instructor

Chris Pond, Adjunct Clinical Professor