Department Chairperson

HeeSoo Oh
Professor of Orthodontics

Program Director

HeeSoo Oh
Professor of Orthodontics

Associate Director of the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory (CRIL)

HeeSoo Oh
Professor of Orthodontics

Director of the Cleft Lip and Palate Prevention Program

Marie Milena Tolarova
Professor of Orthodontics


B

Marta Parisek Baird
Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
American Board of Orthodontics, Diplomate, 2012
BS, University of the Pacific, Biological Sciences Summa Cum Laude, 2005
DDS, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, Dentistry, 2008
McLaughlin, 2 year course, 2017
MSD, CERT, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, MS in Dentistry, Certification in Orthodontics, 2011
Western Regional Board Exam, successfully completed, 2008

Roger P. Boero
Associate Professor of Orthodontics
DDS, College of Physicians Surgeons (UOP), Dentistry, 1964
MSD, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 1995
Pomona College, 1960
University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 1975

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C

David William Chambers
Professor of Orthodontics
AB, Harvard University, Experimental psychology, 1965
Cambridge University, Department of Philosophy, Visiting Scholar, 2008
Center for Philosophy of Natural and Social Sciences, London School of Economics, Visiting Scholar, 2012
EdM, Harvard University, School of Education, Educational evaluation, 1966
MBA, San Francisco State University, Management and operations research, 1979
PhD, Stanford University, School of Education, Educational psychology, 1969
University of California, Berkeley, Department of Philosophy, Visiting Scholar, 2010

James Chen
Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
Certificate, University of California - San Francisco, Advanced Training in Clinical Research, 2012
Certificate, University of California - San Francisco, Orthodontics, 2011
DDS, University of California - San Francisco, Dentistry, 2005
Other, University of California - Berkeley, MPH - Health Policy Concentration, 2011
PhD, University of California - San Francisco, Oral and Craniofacial Sciences, 2011

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K

Katherine Kieu
Instructor of Orthodontics
BS, University of California, Los Angeles, Biology, 2005
DDS, University of California, San Francisco, Dentistry, 2009
MSD, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 2012

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M

Kimberly A Mahood
Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BS, University of Louisville, Biology, 2000
DMD, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Dentistry, 2004
MSD, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, Orthodontics, 2010
University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2005
University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, Advanced General Dentistry, 2007

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O

HeeSoo Oh
Professor of Orthodontics
Chonnam National University Hospital, Korea, Pediatric Dentistry, 1992
DDS, Chonnam National University School of Dentistry, Korea, Dentistry, 1989
MS, Chonnam National University, School of Dentistry, Korea, Pediatric Dentistry, 1992
MSD, University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni, School of Dentistry, Orthodontics, 2005
PhD, Chonnam National University, School of Dentistry, Korea, Oral Biology, 1999
University of the Pacific, School of Dentistry, Graduate Residency Program - AEGD, 2001

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P

Joorok Park
Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BA, University of California, Berkeley, Molecular and Cell Biology, 2001
DMD, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine, Dental Medicine, 2006
MSD, University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, Certificate, Orthodontics, 2008

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S

Heeyeon Suh
Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BS, Seoul National University, Chemical Engineering, 2004
DDS, Seoul National University, General Dentistry, 2009
PhD, Seoul National University, Dentistry, 2015

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T

Miroslav Tolar
Associate Professor of Orthodontics
MD, Charles University School of Medicine, 1965
PhD, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences Charles University School of Medicine, Postgraduate Program in Physiology, 1970
University of California in San Francisco, Postgraduate course in biostatistics biomodeling, 1993

Marie Milena Tolarova
Professor of Orthodontics
Board Cert, Postgraduate Medical Institute, Prague, Czechoslovakia, Medical Genetics, Board Certificate, 1985
Board Cert, Postgraduate Medical Institute, Prague, Czechoslovakia, Pediatrics, Board Certificate, 1985
DSc, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czechoslovakia, Medical Genetics, 1986
Gymnasium, Tabor, Czechoslovakia, College education, 1959
MD, Charles University School of Medicine, Medicine, 1965
PhD, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences Charles University School of Medicine, Prague, Czechoslovakia, Human Genetics, 1979

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Y

Jennifer Yau
Instructor of Orthodontics
BS, University of the Pacific, Biology, 2009
DDS, University of California, Los Angeles, Doctor of Dental Surgery,, 2013
MSD, University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, Certificate in Orthodontics, 2015

Olivia Yue
Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
DDS, University of California, Los Angeles: School of Dentistry, 2015
New York University School of Dentistry, Orthodontic Residency, 2018
NYU Langone, Orthodontic Craniofacial Fellowship, 2019

A

Hesham Amer
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BDS, Cairo University (Cairo, Egypt), General Dentistry, 1995
MS, University of the Pacific School of Dentistry, Orthodontics, 2001

Christopher Anderson
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BS, Santa Clara University, Biology, 2001
DDS, University of the Pacific, Dentistry, 2004
MSD, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 2006

Maryse M. Aubert
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthodontics
DDS, University Paris V, Dentistry, 1976
MA, University of the Pacific, Education, 1994
MA, University of the Pacific, Psychology and Counseling, 1994
University of California, San Francisco, Certificate of Participation - Temporomandibular, 1996
University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 1980
University Paris VII, Embryology, 1976

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B

Thomas Reed Bales
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
Certificate, UCLA, Orthodontics, 1976
DDS, University of the Pacific, School of Dentistry, Dental, 1974
University of California Davis, 1971

Robert L. Boyd
Adjunct Professor of Orthodontics
CERT, University of Pennsylvania, Orthodontics, 1974
CERT, University of Pennsylvania, Periodontics, 1972
DDS, Temple University, Dentistry, 1970
Indiana University, Biology, 1966
Med, University of Florida, Dental Education, 1981

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C

Ana Calles
Adjunct Instructor of Orthodontics
BA, Wake Forest University, Spanish Literature, 2011
DMD, Harvard University, Dentistry, 2017
MSD, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 2019

Sean K. Carlson
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BA, University of California, Santa Barbara, Biology, 1989
DMD, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Dentistry, 1994
MS, University of California, San Francisco, Oral Biology, 1998
University of California, San Francisco, Orthodontics Certificate, 1998

William A Cole
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthodontics
BA, Washington and Jefferson College, Biology, 1981
Cert, University of California, San Francisco, Orthodontics, 1986
DMD, New Jersey Dental School, Dental, 1983

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D

Bill Dischinger
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BS, Oregon State University, Pre Dental, 1994
Certificate, Tufts University, Orthodontics, 1999
DMD, Oregon Health Sciences University, Dentistry, 1997
Lake Oswego High School, 1990

Steven A. Dugoni
Adjunct Professor of Orthodontics
DMD, Tufts University, 1979
MSD, University of the Pacific, 1981

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F

Stuart Lund Frost
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
Arizona State University, 1989
DDS, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, Dentistry, 1992
Eastman School of Dentistry, Certificate in TMJD, 1988
Mesa Community College, 1989
University of Rochester, Eastman Dental Center, Certificate in Orthodontics, 2000

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G

John P. Gibbs
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthodontics
BS, University of Nebraska, Nebraska, 1954
DDS, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Nebraska, Doctor of Dental Surgery, 1956
Other, University of Nebraska, Nebraska, Orthodontics, 1960

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H

David C. Hatcher
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthodontics
BA, Central Washington State College (1969), Biology
Columbia Basin Comm. College, Pasco, Washington (1967), Biology
DDS, University of Washington, Seattle (1973), Dentistry
M.R.C.D., University of Toronto, Ontario Canada (1983), Oral Radiology
M.Sc., University of Toronto, Ontario Canada (1983), Oral Radiology
University of Vermont Medical Center (1976), General Practice Residency
University of Washington, Seattle (1965), Biology
University of Washington, Seattle (1968), Biology
Western Washington State College (1969), Biology

Hyeon-Shik Hwang
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthodontics
DDS, Yonsei University, Dentistry, 1983
MSD, Yonsei University, Orthodontics, 1989
Other, Yonsei University, Pre-Dentistry, 1979
PhD, Yonsei University, Orthodontics, 1992

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J

Adrienne Joy
Adjunct Instructor of Orthodontics
AB, Princeton University, Chemistry, 2011
Certificate, Princeton University, Materials Science and Engineering, 2011
Certificate, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 2018
DMD, University of Pennsylvania, Dentistry, 2016
MSD, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 2018

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K

Paul M Kasrovi
Adjunct Professor of Orthodontics
BS, University of Southern Cal (USC), Biomedical Engineering, 1984
DDS, UCSF, Dental Sciences, 1992
MS, UCSF, orthodontics, oral biology, 1995
MS, University of Pennsylvania, Electrical Engineering, 1986

Rebecca B Keller
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BA, University of the Pacific, Applied Sciences (awarded in 2000), 2000
Certificate, Harvard - Wide General Practice Residency, Hospital Based General Practice Residency, 1999
Certificate, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, orthodontics, 2003
DDS, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, dentistry, 1998
Livermore High School, High School Diploma, 1993
MSD, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, orthodontics, 2003
University of Southern California, 1995

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L

Jetson Scott Lee
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthodontics
AB, University of California, Berkeley, Biological Sciences, 1981
Certificate, University of the Pacific, School of Dentistry, Orthodontics, 1986
DDS, University of the Pacific School of Dentistry, Dentistry, 1984
MSD, University of the Pacific, School of Dentistry, Orthodontics, 1986

Victor S. Lee
Adjunct Instructor of Orthodontics
Beijing University, completed two courses of Chinese (Mandarin) Langua, 2002
BS, University of California, Davis, Neurology, Physiology and Behavior: Exercise Biol, 2007
DDS, University of California, Los Angeles School of Dentistry, Dentistry, 2011
Kyoto Seika University, completed three courses of Japanese Language, 2007
MSD, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 2013

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M

Setareh Mozafari
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
DDS, Azad University, School of Dentistry, Dental, 2001
DDS, University of Southern California, School of Dentistry, Dental, 2005
University of Rochester, Eastman Dental Center, Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, 2007

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P

Brian W Payne
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BA, University of California Berkeley, Biology, 1983
Certificate, University of California San Francisco, Orthodontics, 1988
DDS, University of the Pacific, Dentistry, 1986

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R

Shikha Rathi
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BDS, D.Y. Patil College of Dentistry, general dentistry, 2004
Certificate, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, Oral and maxillofacial Radiology, 2010
D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, General Dentistry Internship, 2005
MS, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, 2011
Preceptors, University of Texas HSC San Antonio, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, 2007

W. Ron Redmond
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthodontics
BA, U C Riverside, Zoology, 1962
DDS, University of the Pacific, Dentistry, 1966
MS, University of Southern California, Orthodontics, 1970

Michael R. Ricupito
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthodontics
BA, San Jose State University, Biological Science, Psychology minor, 1980
DDS, University of the Pacific School of Dentistry, Dentistry, 1983
MS, University of California at Los Angeles School of Dentistry, Oral Biology, 1987
University of California at Los Angeles School of Dentistry, Certificate in Orthodontics, 1987

Bert D. Rouleau
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BS, University of Vermont, Zoology, Botany, 1975
DMD, Tufts University, Dentistry, 1978
MS, Northwestern University, Pediatric Dentistry, 1980
MSD, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 1982

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S

L. William Schmohl
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BS, University of California Berkeley, Business Administration, 1966
DDS, University of California, San Francisco, Dentistry, 1970
MS, Case Western Reserve University, Orthodontics, 1974
U.S. Naval Hospital, Oakland, CA, Externship, 1969

Kenneth Shimizu
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BS, University of California, Berkeley, Biology, 1980
DDS, University of the Pacific, Dentistry, 1985
MSD, University of the Pacific, Orthodontics, 1987

Kevin Shimizu
Adjunct Instructor of Orthodontics
BS, UC Davis, Biological Sciences Environmental Toxicology, 2013
DDS, University of the Pacific Athur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, dentistry, 2017
MSD, University of the Pacific Athur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, orthodontics, 2019

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T

Sandra Khong Tai
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BDS, University Malaya, Dentistry, 1986
MS, University of Minnesota, Orthodontics, 1990

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W

Gregory V Wadden
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
BS, University of Maryland, Zoology, 1968
Certificate, DeWitt Army Hospital, Rotating Dental Internship, 1973
Certificate, University of the Pacific, orthodontics, 1977
DDS, Georgetown University, Dentistry, 1972

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Y

Audrey Yoon
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Orthodontics
DDS, Seoul National University, College of Dentistry, South Korea, dentistry, 2000
DDS, University of California, Los Angles, dentistry, 2004
MS, University of California, Los Angeles, Oral Biology, 2008
Seoul National University, College of Natural Science, South Korea, preliminary course in dentistry, 1996
University of California, Los Angeles, orthodontics, 2008
University of California, Los Angeles, pediatrics, 2008

Course Descriptions

Predoctoral Courses

OR 244. Orthodontics. 2 Units.

An introduction to orthodontic diagnostic procedures, comprehensive treatment planning, and various treatment modalities as applied to a full range of malocclusions in a general dental practice. A strong emphasis is placed on the use of the Invisalign appliance and its application in general practice. Other orthodontic appliances covered will be the functional appliance as it relates to early orthodontic treatment and the edgewise appliance in full comprehensive cases. Orthognathic surgical cases and use of microimplants for anchorage will also be reviewed. (20 hours lecture. Quarters 4-5.).

OR 249. Preclinical Orthodontics. 1 Unit.

This preclinical course introduces students to various removable and fixed appliances with primary focus on their application for minor orthodontic movement. Laboratory instruction addresses such areas as fabrication of removable and fixed appliances, cementation of bands, bonding of brackets and placement of arch wires. Lateral head films are traced, measured, analyzed, and discussed with regard to norms and growth patterns. The course also introduces students to 3-D computer technology for the manufacturing of the Invisalign system appliance and the use of this appliance in general practice. Emphasis is placed on critical self-evaluation skills. (12 hours seminar. Quarter 8.).

OR 348. Applied Orthodontics. 1 Unit.

A study of standard orthodontic records and their application to diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment evaluation in the mixed and permanent dentitions. Students will present cases incorporating digital records, cephalometric analysis, photographs, to explain diagnostic, treatment planning, and treatment procedures. (12 hours seminar, 6 hours graduate orthodontic clinic. Quarters 9-10.).

Graduate Courses

OR 401. Cephalometrics. 4 Units.

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the use of cephalometric radiographs in clinical orthodontics. In addition to understanding basic principles and the historical signficance of cephalometry, students will learn how to interpret various cephalometric analyses that are most commonly used in diagnosis and treatment planning. At the end of this course, students should also be able to perform various methods of superimposition in order to identify and understand changes that occurred during growth and treatment between different lateral cephalometric radiographs. (Quarters 1-2.).

OR 402. Facial Growth. 4 Units.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with scientific literature that supports current knowledge and understanding of basic biological principles on craniofacial growth and development. This course focuses on the basic mechanisms of postnatal growth of the cranium, nasomaxillary complex and mandible, and the clinical application of facial growth principles. (Quarters 3-4.).

OR 403. Critical Thinking - Research Design. 3 Units.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with foundational knowledge on scientific methods, while also honing an ability to critically evaluate the literature and to design a sound research project. (Quarters 2-4.).

OR 404. Research Practicum and Thesis I. 2 Units.

This is an independent research course. Under the guidance of research mentors, students develop research questions, formulate hypotheses and write a formal research proposal that includes a full literature review, statement of material and methods, execution of the research, and appropriate analysis and interpretation of data. This course is designed to enable successful completion of the MS thesis. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 410. Biomechanics. 7 Units.

The purpose of the course is to introduce fundamental concepts for understanding the laws of mechanics and biological responses to force systems used in orthodontic appliances. This is a seminar-based course designed to teach first year residents the basic principles of biomechanics and theories related to planning and designing orthodontic force systems. Students will be expected to read and understand background material in assigned articles & textbooks for seminar discussions. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 411. Genetics in Orthodontics. 2 Units.

In about sixty percent of dental conditions and diseases, genetics plays an important – and sometimes the major – role in etiology. As orthodontics is focusing on treatment of malocclusions and dentofacial deformities, in etiology of which genetics is almost always in the background, it is important for an orthodontist to understand why or how a malocclusion occurs, how it reacts to a treatment plan, to what extent it may be expressed in the next generation, and - last but not least - if it can be prevented. The concepts of heredity and genetics in orthodontics are covered in this course starting with historical Orthodontia Era (1900-1930), through Hereditary vs Environment Era (1930-1970) and Heritability Era (1970-2000) to the present time Orthodontic Genomic Era. Nowadays, genetics is a backbone of personalized medicine and also of personalized orthodontics. Patient’s treatment outcome may be affected by combinations of specific gene mutations not only in orofacial clefts, craniofacial anomalies and malocclusions, but also in external apical root resorption, mandibular morphology, tooth size, hypodontia, and other conditions. Understanding of basic genetic and translational research concepts is needed for precision orthodontics and for utilization of modern genomic information for improved treatment of malocclusions and dentofacial deformities. (Quarters 2-3.).

OR 412. Orofacial Clefts and Abnormal Craniofacial Development. 2 Units.

This course provides information needed for understanding of concepts related to disturbed and compromised craniofacial growth. It forms a necessary background that makes possible to distinguish and diagnose craniofacial abnormalities. Principles of developmental craniofacial biology and craniofacial embryology are reviewed and continuously updated with new findings and discoveries. Particular emphasis is given to molecular regulation of craniofacial morphogenesis, abnormal neural crest formation (leading to Treacher Collins syndrome, Pierre Robin sequence, DiGeorge sequence, and Hemifacial Microsomia), and molecular regulation of skeletal morphogenesis and disorders comprising the FGFR-related craniosynostosis spectrum (Apert, Crouzon, Pfeiffer, Muenke, Jackson-Weiss, and Beare-Stevenson syndromes). In order to build a solid foundation for the clinical dental treatment and, specifically, for orthodontic treatment of orofacial clefts (cleft lip, cleft and palate and cleft palate only) – complex etiology of these anomalies, that is influenced by a genetic background and environmental factors, is explained. Points of origin and importance of precise diagnosis of nonsyndromic and syndromic cases are emphasized. (Quarter 4.).

OR 414. Introduction to Contemporary Orthodontics. 4 Units.

The purpose of the course is to introduce basic artistic skills in contemporary orthodontics. This is a seminar-based course designed for first year residents to review the basic concepts of photography, direct bonding of fixed appliances, 3D imaging, 3D cephalometric analysis, and digital imaging software (2D and 3D).Students will be expected to read and understand background material in assigned articles for seminar discussions.  They are also expected to complete assignments. This course will consist of 17 seminar sessions throughout the first year of residency. (Quarters 1-3.).

OR 420. Bone Biology and Microimplant. 4 Units.

The purpose of this course is for students to gain an understanding of the general biological activities of bone. This is a seminar-based course designed for first year residents to review basic concepts and theories of bone biology, orthodontic tooth movement, and osseointegration of orthodontic microimplants. Students will be expected to read and understand background material in assigned articles & textbooks for seminar discussions. This course will consist of 10 seminar sessions throughout the first year of residency.

OR 421. Current Literature Seminar I. 4 Units.

A review of articles appearing in orthodontic and related journals is presented using a seminar format. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 422. Anatomy. 1 Unit.

This course provides a detailed review of anatomic structures of the craniofacial region. Lecture topics include osteology of the skull, innervation and blood supply of the face, muscles of facial expression and mastication, and anatomy of the oral cavity. (Quarter 1.).

OR 423. Comprehensive Case Analysis Seminar I. 4 Units.

The seminar highlights the clinical application of various diagnostic procedures and treatment philosophies and the presentation of practical procedures in the management of unusual problems that can arise during the course of treatment. Basic and applied principles of photography and advances in computer technology are integral to this course. During each session, a Comprehensive Case Analysis is presented by the second year residents. All students then participate in discussion about the case. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 424. Treatment Planning Seminar I. 8 Units.

A case presentation is prepared by the first-year residents to share initial diagnostic records in order to diagnose and treatment plan orthodontic cases. All students then participate in free-format discussion. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 426. Principles of Orthodontic Technique. 5 Units.

This course is designed to provide basic principles on orthodontic tooth movement and fixed appliances by working on typodonts. (Quarters 1-2.).

OR 430. Surgical-Orthodontic Treatment. 4 Units.

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with fundamental knowledge in orthognathic surgery and its role in the orthodontic treatment of skeletal malocclusions. This seminar-based course covers basic concepts involved in surgical orthodontics, which include: diagnosis and treatment planning, pre-surgical orthodontics, surgical procedures utilized by oral surgeons, and post-surgical orthodontics. In addition, topics such as TMJ disorders, Distraction Osteogenesis, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea are discussed. The goal is for the student to understand these surgical concepts and implement them in the clinical treatment of orthognathic surgery patients. (Quarters 1-3.).

OR 431. Orthognathic Surgery Seminar I. 4 Units.

This course is a joint seminar for the orthodontic and oral surgery residents that is held once a month during the first and second years of the residency program. The Orthognathic Surgery Seminar consists of case presentations by the Orthodontic and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery faculty and residents. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis, treatment planning, management of pre- & post surgical orthodontic treatment, and understanding of treatment outcome and stability. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 432. Multidisciplinary Seminar I. 2 Units.

The treatment of patients with complex dental and skeletal orthodontic, periodontal, and restorative problems that requires input from a variety of dental specialties is considered. The teaching format includes case presentations by the residents and open discussions of interdisciplinary topics. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 433. Retention Seminar I. 1 Unit.

Long-term post-active treatment records provide invaluable material for studying stability of orthodontic treatment outcome. Each of the second year residents is required to present the long-term post retention patient whose active orthodontic treatment was completed at least ten years prior to the resident’s year of graduation from the program. Faculty and the first year residents are participated in the discussion after the presentation. (Quarter 4.).

OR 440. Imaging in Orthodontics, TMJ & Airway Consideration. 2 Units.

Orthodontists have a fundamental interest in facial form, facial growth patterns, occlusion and any pathologic conditions that may alter them. Current three dimensional (3D) imaging techniques available for routine imaging provide the opportunity to utilize a "systems approach" in order to visualize and evaluate the functional and developmental relationships between proximal craniofacial regions. This course will discuss the use of 3D imaging to evaluate the developmental and functional inter-relationships between TMJ, occlusions, airway, and facial growth.

OR 441. Orthodontic Treatment of Craniofacial Anomolies. 2 Units.

Understand and relate embryology, abnormal growth and development and sequelae of surgical repair of craniofacial anomalies to the orthodontic treatment of craniofacial anomalies.

OR 442. Clear Aligner Technique I. 4 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce basic knowledge on clinical applications of clear aligner therapy. The residents will learn the latest innovation, biomechanics, and treatment protocols in treating complex malocclusions using clear aligners.

OR 443. Dental Sleep Medicine I. 2 Units.

There is increasing interest in the role of the orthodontist both in screening for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and as a practitioner who may be valuable in the multidisciplinary management of OSA in both children and adults. As experts in the science of facial growth and development, combined with our knowledge of oral devices, orthodontists are well suited to collaborate with physicians and other allied health providers in the treatment of OSA.This course will cover both the medical and dental aspects of sleep disorders, the pediatric and adult risk factors for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), and treatment alternatives, paticularly, orthodontic treatment application including maxillary skeletal expansion and oral appliance.

OR 444. Periodontic-Orthodontic Relations. 4 Units.

This course includes the Orthodontic-Restorative-Periodontal Interface: Esthetic & Functional Considerations, Periodontal and Other Benefits of Two Phase vs. Single Phase Orthodontic Treatment, Clinical Considerations of Orthodontic Root Resorption, Periodontal Considerations in the Orthodontic Treatment of Impacted Teeth, Invisalign treatment Part II-Invisalign Treatment: What are the Latest Innovations from Invisalign and Do They make Possible Now the Successful Treatment of Complex Class, I, II, and III Malocclusions?

OR 456. Clinical Orthodontics I. 30 Units.

Clinical orthodontics includes various appliance systems: edgewise appliance (.018 & .022" slot), TAD, self-ligating brackets, fixed-functional appliance (Herbst, Forsus), and Invisalign for adolescent and adult patients. Clinical experience in treating orthodontic patients with a variety of problems is provided. In addition, various orthopedic appliances, including the headgear, face mask, rapid maxillary expander and other fixed auxillary appliances (LLA, TPA, Wilson distalizer) may be incorporated into specific treatment protocols. Patients are treated in the Graduate Orthodontic Clinic every afternoon Monday-Friday, as well as Thursday nights. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 457. Mixed Dentition Orthodontics I. 8 Units.

In addition to a didactic portion that focuses on the review of mixed dentition articles and comprehensive case analyses, this course also includes clinical sessions that provide residents with basic knowledge and experience in treating various malocclusions in the mixed dentition stage. This course provides an understanding of facial growth and occlusal development in the mixed dentition, an ability to diagnosis and treatment plan mixed dentition cases, and an ability to evaluate growth changes and treatment outcomes. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 458. Surgical Orthodontics I. 2 Units.

This course provides clinical experience in analyzing diagnostic records and formulating surgical orthodontic treatment plans for patients with major skeletal and dental disharmonies that require integration of surgical and orthodontic treatment , communication with surgeons, pre-and post- surgical orthodotnic treatment, and evaluation of treatment outcomes. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 459. Clinical Orthodontics in Craniofacial Anomalies I. 2 Units.

This course combines the orthodontic treatment of patients with craniofacial anomalies in the graduate clinic and attending panels provided by comprehensive Oakland Children's Hospital Craniofacial Anomalies Teams. (Quarters 1-4.).

OR 501. Principles of Orthodontics. 8 Units.

Principles of Orthodontics is a literature-based seminar. Each resident will participate in discussion with emphasis on the critical analysis and evaluation of the scientific methodology in the literature reviewed. Topics include Principles of Orthodontics Introduction, Biomechanics, Facial growth, Retention & Relapse, Functional appliances, Intraoral forces, Mandibular motion & Tooth contact, Maxillo-Mandibular references, and Occlusal treatment objectives. Each seminar will focus on the clinical application of the material. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 502. Microimplant I. 1 Unit.

The objective of the course is to comprehensively review the factors related to safety and stability of orthodontic microimplants and their clinical application in orthodontic treatment. Students will be expected to read and understand background material in assigned articles for seminar discussions.  They will also present their own clinical cases that utilized microimplants.

OR 503. Research Design I. 2 Units.

An advanced course for orthodontic graduate students in which the nature of hypothesis testing, the process of clinical decision making, and the statistical methodology to be employed in each student’s thesis project is discussed. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 504. Research Practicum and Thesis II. 5 Units.

This is an independent research course. Under the guidance of research mentors, students develop research questions, formulate hypotheses and write a formal research proposal that includes a full literature review, statement of material and methods, execution of the research, and appropriate analysis and interpretation of data. This course is designed to enable successful completion of the MS thesis. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 511. Practice Management I. 2 Units.

The goal of the Practice Management Course is to introduce and familiarize the orthodontic residents with a multitude of basic concepts that include human resource management, management systems, marketing, legal aspects of orthodontics, associateships/practice ownership, and customer service. The course includes: 1) guest lectures by orthodontists, orthodontic consultants, and other professionals connected to the specialty of orthodontics, and 2) private practice office visits both in the San Francisco Bay area and out-of-state. (Quarters 7-8.).

OR 512. Preparation for Specialty Examination. 2 Units.

This course will prepare the 2nd year residents for the American Board of Orthodontics Written Exam.  This provides a comprehensive review of basic sciences and clinical concepts in orthodontics. This course will consist of 10 seminar sessions during the Winter and Spring quarters of the 2nd year of residency. (Quarter 7.).

OR 514. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders. 1 Unit.

This course provides an overview of clinical anatomy and mechanics of the TMJ, pathogenesis of degenerative TMD disorders, and various approaches on the management of TMD. (Quarter 7).

OR 521. Current Literature Seminar II. 4 Units.

A review of articles appearing in orthodontic and related journals is presented using a seminar format. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 523. Comprehensive Case Analysis Seminar II. 4 Units.

The seminar highlights the clinical application of various diagnostic procedures and treatment philosophies and the presentation of practical procedures in the management of unusual problems that can arise during the course of treatment. Basic and applied principles of photography and advances in computer technology are integral to this course. During each session, a Comprehensive Case Analysis is presented by the second year residents. All students then participate in discussion about the case. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 524. Treatment Planning Seminar II. 8 Units.

A case presentation is prepared by the second-year residents to share initial diagnostic records in order to diagnose and treatment plan orthodontic cases. All students then participate in free-format discussion.

OR 531. Orthognathic Surgery Seminar II. 4 Units.

This course is a joint seminar for the orthodontic and oral surgery residents that is held once a month during the first and second years of the residency program. The Orthognathic Surgery Seminar consists of case presentations by the Orthodontic and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery faculty and residents. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis, treatment planning, management of pre- & post surgical orthodontic treatment, and understanding of treatment outcome and stability. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 532. Multidisciplinary Seminar II. 2 Units.

The treatment of patients with complex dental and skeletal orthodontic, periodontal, and restorative problems that requires input from a variety of dental specialties is considered. The teaching format includes case presentations by the residents and open discussions of interdisciplinary topics. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 533. Retention Seminar II. 1 Unit.

Long-term post-active treatment records provide invaluable material for studying stability of orthodontic treatment outcome. Each of the second year residents is required to present the long-term post retention patient whose active orthodontic treatment was completed at least ten years prior to the resident’s year of graduation from the program. Faculty and the first year residents are participated in the discussion after the presentation. (Quarter 8.).

OR 541. Orthodontic Treatment of Craniofacial Anomalies II. 4 Units.

Understand and relate embryology, abnormal growth and development and sequelae of surgical repair of craniofacial anomalies to the orthodontic treatment of craniofacial anomalies.

OR 542. Clear Aligner Technique II. 4 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce basic knowledge on clinical applications of clear aligner therapy. The residents will learn the latest innovation, biomechanics, and treatment protocols in treating complex Malocclusions using clear aligners.

OR 543. Dental Sleep Medicine II. 2 Units.

There is increasing interest in the role of the orthodontist both in screening for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and as a practitioner who may be valuable in the multidisciplinary management of OSA in both children and adults. As experts in the science of facial growth and development, combined with our knowledge of oral devices, orthodontists are well suited to collaborate with physicians and other allied health providers in the treatment of OSA.This course will cover both the medical and dental aspects of sleep disorders, the pediatric and adult risk factors for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), and treatment alternatives, paticularly, orthodontic treatment application including maxillary skeletal expansion and oral appliance.

OR 544. Multidisciplinary Course. 2 Units.

The collaboration between orthodontists and other specialties is essential for multidisciplinary treatment approach. This course include preventive dentistry, periodontics, restorative dentistry, implantology, endodontics, pedodontics, esthetic dentistry.

OR 556. Clinical Orthodontics II. 38 Units.

Clinical orthodontics includes various appliance systems: edgewise appliance (.018 & .022" slot), TAD, self-ligating brackets, fixed-functional appliance (Herbst, Forsus), and Invisalign for adolescent and adult patients. Clinical experience in treating orthodontic patients with a variety of problems is provided. In addition, various orthopedic appliances, including the headgear, face mask, rapid maxillary expander and other fixed auxillary appliances (LLA, TPA, Wilson distalizer) may be incorporated into specific treatment protocols. Patients are treated in the Graduate Orthodontic Clinic every afternoon Monday-Friday, as well as Thursday nights. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 557. Mixed Dentition Orthodontics II. 8 Units.

In addition to a didactic portion that focuses on the review of mixed dentition articles and comprehensive case analyses, this course also includes clinical sessions that provide residents with basic knowledge and experience in treating various malocclusions in the mixed dentition stage. This course provides an understanding of facial growth and occlusal development in the mixed dentition, an ability to diagnosis and treatment plan mixed dentition cases, and an ability to evaluate growth changes and treatment outcomes. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 558. Surgical Orthodontics II. 3 Units.

This course provides clinical experience in analyzing diagnostic records and formulating surgical orthodontic treatment plans for patients with major skeletal and dental disharmonies that require integration of surgical and orthodontic treatment , communication with surgeons, pre-and post- surgical orthodotnic treatment, and evaluation of treatment outcomes. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 559. Clinical Orthodontics in Craniofacial Anomalies II. 3 Units.

This course combines the orthodontic treatment of patients with craniofacial anomalies in the graduate clinic and attending panels provided by comprehensive KAISER and Oakland Children's Hospital Craniofacial Anomalies Teams. (Quarters 5-8.).

OR 602. Microimplant II. 1 Unit.

The objective of the course is to comprehensively review the factors related to safety and stability of orthodontic microimplants and their clinical application in orthodontic treatment. Students will be expected to read and understand background material in assigned articles for seminar discussions.  They will also present their own clinical cases that utilized microimplants. This course will consist of 16 seminar sessions throughout the second and third year of residency. (Quarter 9.).

OR 603. Research Design II. 1 Unit.

An advanced course for orthodontic graduate students in which the nature of hypothesis testing, the process of clinical decision making, and the statistical methodology to be employed in each student’s thesis project is discussed. (Quarter 9.).

OR 604. Research Practicum and Thesis III. 6 Units.

This is an independent research course. Under the guidance of research mentors, students develop research questions, formulate hypotheses and write a formal research proposal that includes a full literature review, statement of material and methods, execution of the research, and appropriate analysis and interpretation of data. This course is designed to enable successful completion of the MS thesis. (Quarter 9.).

OR 611. Practice Management II. 2 Units.

The goal of the Practice Management Course is to introduce and familiarize the orthodontic residents with a multitude of basic concepts that include human resource management, management systems, marketing, legal aspects of orthodontics, associateships/practice ownership, and customer service. The course includes: 1) guest lectures by orthodontists, orthodontic consultants, and other professionals connected to the specialty of orthodontics, and 2) private practice office visits both in the San Francisco Bay area and out-of-state. (Quarter 9.).

OR 612. Ethics. 1 Unit.

This is an intermediate-advanced course that builds on undergraduate ethics instruction and focuses on issues unique to orthodontic practice. Typical or expectable ethical problems in orthodontics are studied. Reflection and student participation is emphasized in discussions of real-life cases. (Quarter 9.).

OR 613. Orthodontics Speaker Series. 1 Unit.

This course includes various topics in orthodontics. (Quarter 9.).

OR 621. Current Literature Seminar III. 1 Unit.

A review of articles appearing in orthodontic and related journals is presented using a seminar format. (Quarter 9.).

OR 623. Comprehensive Case Analysis Seminar III. 1 Unit.

The seminar highlights the clinical application of various diagnostic procedures and treatment philosophies and the presentation of practical procedures in the management of unusual problems that can arise during the course of treatment. Basic and applied principles of photography and advances in computer technology are integral to this course. During each session, a Comprehensive Case Analysis is presented by the second year residents. All students then participate in discussion about the case. (Quarter 9.).

OR 624. Treatment Planning Seminar III. 2 Units.

A case presentation is prepared by the third-year residents to share initial diagnostic records in order to diagnose and treatment plan orthodontic cases. All students then participate in free-format discussion.

OR 631. Orthognathic Surgery Seminar III. 1 Unit.

This course is a joint seminar for the orthodontic and oral surgery residents that is held once a month during the first and second years of the residency program. The Orthognathic Surgery Seminar consists of case presentations by the Orthodontic and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery faculty and residents. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis, treatment planning, management of pre- & post surgical orthodontic treatment, and understanding of treatment outcome and stability. (Quarter 9.).

OR 632. Multidisciplinary Seminar III. 1 Unit.

The treatment of patients with complex dental and skeletal orthodontic, periodontal, and restorative problems that requires input from a variety of dental specialties is considered. The teaching format includes case presentations by the residents and open discussions of interdisciplinary topics. (Quarter 9.).

OR 656. Clinical Orthodontics III. 9 Units.

Clinical orthodontics includes various appliance systems: edgewise appliance (.018 & .022" slot), TAD, self-ligating brackets, fixed-functional appliance (Herbst, Forsus), and Invisalign for adolescent and adult patients. Clinical experience in treating orthodontic patients with a variety of problems is provided. In addition, various orthopedic appliances, including the headgear, face mask, rapid maxillary expander and other fixed auxillary appliances (LLA, TPA, Wilson distalizer) may be incorporated into specific treatment protocols. Patients are treated in the Graduate Orthodontic Clinic every afternoon Monday-Friday, as well as Thursday nights. (Quarter 9.).

OR 657. Mixed Dentition Orthodontics III. 2 Units.

In addition to a didactic portion that focuses on the review of mixed dentition articles and comprehensive case analyses, this course also includes clinical sessions that provide residents with basic knowledge and experience in treating various malocclusions in the mixed dentition stage. This course provides an understanding of facial growth and occlusal development in the mixed dentition, an ability to diagnosis and treatment plan mixed dentition cases, and an ability to evaluate growth changes and treatment outcomes. (Quarter 9.).

OR 658. Surgical Orthodontics III. 1 Unit.

This course provides clinical experience in analyzing diagnostic records and formulating surgical orthodontic treatment plans for patients with major skeletal and dental disharmonies that require integration of surgical and orthodontic treatment , communication with surgeons, pre-and post- surgical orthodotnic treatment, and evaluation of treatment outcomes. (Quarter 9.).

OR 659. Clinical Orthodontics in Craniofacial Anomalies III. 1 Unit.

This course combines the orthodontic treatment of patients with craniofacial anomalies in the graduate clinic and attending panels provided by comprehensive KAISER and Oakland Children's Hospital Craniofacial Anomalies Teams. (Quarter 9.).