Department Co-Chairpersons

Homayon (Homer) Asadi
Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences

David M. Ojcius
Professor of Biomedical Sciences


A

Homayon (Homer) Asadi
Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences
B.A., San Jose State University, Biology, 1984
D.D.S., University of the Pacific, 1988
Other, San Jose City College, 1982

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B

Alan Budenz
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
Oregon State University, 1972
University of California, Los Angeles, 1977
University of California, San Francisco, 1982
University of Redlands, 1970
University of the Pacific, 2000

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C

Takahiro Chino
Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences
DDS, Japanese Ministry of Public Health, Dentistry, 1991
DDS, Matsumoto Dental University, Dentistry, 1991
Indiana University School of Dentistry, Oral Surgery, Medicine Pathology, 1995
Matsumoto Dental University, Japan, Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, 1993
MSD, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Dental Diagnostic Sciences, 1999
Other, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Oral Diagnosis, 1996
PhD, University of Washington, Oral Biology, 2008
University of Medicine Dentistry of New Jersey, Postdoctoral Fellow, Periodontics, 2010

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D

Nejat A. Duzgunes
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BS, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, Physics, 1972
Diploma, Noble and Grenough School, Deham, Mass., 1968
Other, University of California, San Francisco, Membrane Biophysics, 1981
PhD, State University of New York at Buffalo, Biophysical Sciences, 1978

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H

Xiaoyuan Han
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BS, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China, Basic Pharmacy, 2006
MS, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China, Pharmacology, 2009
Other, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, Postdoctoral Scholar, Anesthesia, 2019
Other, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, Postdoctoral Scholar, Urology, 2017
PhD, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA, Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences (Molecular-Cellular Pharmacology and Toxicology), 2014

Stefan Highsmith
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BA, University of California, Berkeley, Chemistry, 1966
Brandeis University, Physical Chemistry, 1974
PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Organic Chemistry, 1972
University of California, San Francisco, Biophysical Chemistry, 1978

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K

Roman Karp
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
Certificate, ASCP, Pathologists's Assistance, 2009
MD, Ivano-Frankivsk State Medical Institute, Ukraine, General Medicine, 1988

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Ana Carolina Morandini
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
DDS, University of São Paulo, Bauru School of Dentistry, 2006
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Postdoctoral Fellow - Immunobiology, 2014
Medical University of South Carolina, Research Visiting Scholar - Oral Health Sciences, 2016
MS, University of São Paulo, Bauru School of Dentistry, Periodontology, 2009
PhD, University of São Paulo, Bauru School of Dentistry, Oral Biology, 2012
University of São Paulo, Bauru School of Dentistry, Postdoctoral Fellow - Oral Biology, 2015

Alexander J. Murphy
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BS, Brooklyn College, Chemistry, 1962
PhD, Yale University, Biochemistry, 1967
University of California, San Francisco, Biophysical Chemistry, 1970

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O

David M. Ojcius
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BA, University of California, Berkeley, Biophysics, 1979
PhD, University of California, Berkeley, Biophysics, 1986

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Erivan Schnaider Ramos Junior
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
DDS, UEPG (State University of Ponta Grossa), Dentistry, 2000
MS, USP, Stomatology/Oral Biology, 2009
PhD, UFRJ (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Institute of Biophysics Carlos Chagas Filho), Biological Science (Biophysics), 2014

Gary D. Richards
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
B.A., University of California at Berkeley, Anthropology, 1980
M.A., University of California at Berkeley, Anthropology, 1984
PhD, University of California at Berkeley, Anthropology, 2007

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T

Norina Tang
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BA, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 1998
BS, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA, 2007
City College of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
PhD, Univeristy of WA, Seattle, 1986

Der Thor
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BS, University of the Pacific, Biological Sciences, 2000
MS, University of the Pacific, Biological Sciences, 2003
PhD, University of the Pacific, Physiology and Pharmacology, 2009

Scott P. Turner
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
A.B., Columbia University, Anthropology, 1994
M.A., University of California, Berkeley, Anthropology, 1997
University of California, Berkeley

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X

Nan Xiao
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BS, Peking University, Stomatology, 2003
MS, Peking University - School of Stomatology, Orthodontics, 2005
PhD, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Biochemistry, 2009

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Z

Benjamin D. Zeitlin
Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BSc, University of Strathclyde, Immunology and Pharmacology, 1992
PhD, Sheffield Hallam University, Immunopharmacology, 2000

C

Luis A. Cordova
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BS, University of Chile, School of Dentistry, Dental Science, 1996
DDS, University of Chile, School of Dentistry, Dentistry, 1996
DDS, University of Chile, School of Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Internship, 2002
PhD, University of Nantes, School of Medicine/INSERM, Orthopaedic Bone Research, 2014

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D

Dorothy Dechant
Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BA, University of California, Berkeley, Anthropology, 1973
MA, University of California, Berkeley, Anthropology, 1978
PhD, University of California, Berkeley, Anthropology, 1982

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H

Robert Francis Halliwell
Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Sciences
BSc, University of Stirling, Biology and Psychology, 1983
Fellowship, University of California, Irvine, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Neuroscience, 1999
MSc, University of London, Neurological Science, 1986
PhD, University of Dundee, Neuropharmacology, 1992

Jill Helms
Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Sciences
Baylor College of Medicine, Postdoctoral fellowship, Molecular Control of Patterning and Morphogenesis in Vertebrate Limb Tissue, 1995
BS, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, Biological Sciences major, 1978
Certificate, U. Connecticut, Health Sciences Center, Certificate Periodontics, 1993
DDS, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, Doctor of Dental Surgery, 1986
Other, Roosevelt High School, Minneapolis, MN, 1975
PhD, Connecticut, Health Sciences Center, Biomedical, Sciences/Neuroscience, 1993
Salk Institute, Laboratory of David Cheresh, PhD, Sabbatical, 2003

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K

Krystyna Konopka
Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Sciences
Bieganski Hospital, Lodz Poland, Clinical Pathology, 1965
High School, Lodz, Poland, 1954
Jonscher Hospital, Lodz Poland, Rotating Internship, 1962
MD, School of Medicine, Lodz, Poland, Medicine, 1961
MS, University of Lodz, Biochemistry, 1966
PhD, University of Lodz, Biochemistry, 1969

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M

Matthew Milnes
Adjunct Instructor of Biomedical Sciences
BS, California Lutheran University, Biology, 1997
DDS, University of the Pacific School of Dentistry, General Dentistry, 2003
MS, University of the Pacific, Biology, 2000

Course Descriptions

Predoctoral Courses

BMS 120. Genetics. 0.7 Units.

Introduction to genetics, hereditary medicine, genetics assessment, and genetics and diseases.

BMS 121. Clinical Pharmacology and Pathology. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the action of therapeutic drugs on dental patients. In addition, the most commonly found pathologic lesions (red and white, ulcerative, etc) will be discussed. This three-quarter course covers the general principles of drug action, including drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and pharmacodynamics of important therapeutic drug categories in combination with the most commonly found oral lesions. The dental implications of therapeutic drugs and commonly found oral lesions will be emphasized and discussed using a seminar, case-based format. (IDS Quarters 1, 2 and 3).

BMS 122. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. 1 Unit.

This course is meant to integrate and apply various disciplines to the diagnosis and treatment planning process. In this interactive class, students will be presented cases with medical-dental, anatomic, pain problems, and psychological issues to discuss. Students in small groups will workup cases and present their diagnostic conclusions and treatment plans to the larger group. The faculty will facilitate and provide feedback on the student conclusions and plans. Students will learn: Commonly encountered medical problems, system disorders, and potential drug interactions in practice and the modifications to be considered in treatment decisions. The anatomy of the oromaxillofacial complex and its relationship to diagnosis and treatment. Diagnosis of orofacial lesions and TMD dysfunction and their effect on treatment The role of the specialist in the diagnostic process and when to consult or refer patients to specialists in patient care. (IDS Quarter 4).

BMS 123. Anatomy and Histology. 5 Units.

The student will gain an understanding of functional histology and gross anatomy of the human body as appropriate for professional health care providers. Emphasis will be on the integration of anatomical knowledge at all levels and its correlation with basic clinical medicine relevant to dentistry.

BMS 124. Applied Biochemistry. 2 Units.

The study of major molecular structures and processes of the human organism. Muscles, neurons, action potentials, extracellular matrix. Additional topics covered are enzymes, pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, anesthesia, and pain.

BMS 130. Applied Physiology. 2 Units.

Clinical application of physiology based on integrated basic biomedical science, including Physiology, Biochemistry, Anatomy and Histology; with specific focus on urinary system, blood vessels and lymphoid organs, heart, GI tract, liver, pancreas, gall bladder, airways and endocrinology.

BMS 133. Applied Orofacial Anatomy. 7 Units.

The student will gain a fundamental understanding of head and neck embryology, gross anatomy, oral histology and oral biology as is appropriate for dental healthcare providers. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of anatomical and functional histological knowledge of the orofacial complex at all levels with basic clinical dentistry and medicine. The establishment of clinical correlations with radiographic interpretation, local anesthesia administration and the overall health will be a strength of this course. Also covered are salivary glands, biochemistry of saliva, structure of hydroxyapatite, mineralization, and salivary diagnostics.

BMS 220. Pharmacology. 5 Units.

Introduction to pharmacology. Pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; local anesthesia; analgesics; prescription writing; anxiolytics; cardiovascular pharmacology; drug interactions; antibiotics; autonomics; immunopharmacology; drugs and hematology, pregnancy, aging; asthma and COPD; antihistamines; corticosteroids; calcium regulation; antifungals, antivirals; alternative therapy; gastrointestinal pharmacology; nitrous; anticancer drugs; general anesthetics; thyroid drugs; neuromuscular; anti-Parkinsons, anti-Alzheimers; psychosis; anti-seizures; anti-sposmatic; substance abuse; opioid crisis; diabetes.

BMS 232. Immunology & Microbiology. 3 Units.

Introduction to immunology and microbiology, immunity to infection, oral microbiology and immunology, and dental plaque.

BMS 233. Virology & Mycology. 1 Unit.

Introduction to virology and mycology, immunity to viral and fungal infection, oral virology and mycology.

Graduate Courses

AN 410. Advanced Head and Neck Anatomy I. 1 Unit.

This course presents head and neck anatomy in depth to provide residents essential foundation for dental procedures. The development of normal and pathological craniofacial shapes, as well as anatomical structures relevant for implant placement, are discussed in detail. (Quarter 1.).

BC 414. Biochemistry and Bioengineering I. 1 Unit.

Residents learn how to assess biocompatibility and longevity of various materials in contact with body fluid and tissues. This course also covers biofilm formation and removal from oral biomaterials. (Quarter 2.).

BMS 400. Directed or Independent Research. 2-10 Units.

Approved directed or independent research on existing or emerging topics in the biomedical, clinical, or educational fields.

BMS 401. Research Philosophy and Design I. 1 Unit.

In this two-quarter foundational course, students learn about hypothesis-driven research, including hypothesis development and significance testing. (Quarter 1.).

BMS 411. Stem Cell Biology I. 1 Unit.

In this two-quarter course, residents discuss in detail current research on cell populations, their properties, and possible application routes--the foundation of modern biology-driven endodontic therapy. Treatment possibilities for immature teeth and other applications in regenerative endodontics are presented. (Quarter 2.).

BMS 412. Topics in Oral Biology I. 1 Unit.

This course covers the interaction of pulpal and periapical tissues with medicaments such as bisphosphonates or TNF-alpha blocking antibodies, the effects of systemic diseases such as HIV, diabetes or sclerodermia on oral tissues, and other common issues in endodontics. (Quarter 4.).

BMS 414. Oral Biology Journal Club I. 3 Units.

This course features discussion of papers on a variety of topics in oral biology.(Quarters 2-4.).

BMS 440. Thesis Protocol. 1 Unit.

In this independent-study research course, residents work with mentor(s) to develop research questions, formulate hypotheses, and write a formal research proposal that includes a full literature review, statement of material and methods, execution of the research, and appropriate analysis and interpretation of data. (Quarter 2.).

BMS 450. Research Project I. 3 Units.

In this independent-study research course, residents work with research mentors to perform the research project, including data gathering, complilation, and interpretation of the results. The course will culminate in a publishable manuscript.(Quarters 1-4.).

BMS 502. Biomedical Science. 1 Unit.

The course will review the embryology, anatomy, bone biology, microbiology, immunology, pathology for dental profession. Emphasis will be on the integration of biomedical sciences knowledge and their relationship with oral health in clinical orthodontics.

BMS 512. Topics in Oral Biology II. 1 Unit.

This course covers the interaction of pulpal and periapical tissues with medicaments such as bisphosphonates or TNF-alpha blocking antibodies, the effects of systemic diseases such as HIV, diabetes or sclerodermia on oral tissues, and other common issues in endodontics. (Quarter 8.).

BMS 514. Oral Biology Journal Club II. 3 Units.

Residents read and discuss current literature on a range of oral biology topics. (Quarters 6-8.).

BMS 550. Research Project II. 3 Units.

In this independent-study research course, residents work with research mentors to perform the research project, including data gathering, complilation, and interpretation of the results. The course will culminate in a publishable manuscript. (Quarters 5-8.).

BMS 651. Manuscript Preparation. 3 Units.

Residents prepare the final version of a publishable manuscript. (Quarter 9.).

MC 404. Host Response I. 1 Unit.

This course extends basic immunology to the etiology of pulpal and periapical disease focusing on the host response. The role of inflammatory mediators and the cells that elaborate them is discussed. (Quarter 1.).

MC 424. Oral Microbiology I. 1 Unit.

Residents learn about microbial structure, metabolism, genetics, and virulence factors; molecular diagnostics and recombinant DNA technology; pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical syndromes, laboratory diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of infectious diseases. (Quarter 2.).

MC 504. Host Response II. 1 Unit.

This course extends from basic immunology to the etiology of pulpal and periapical disease focusing on the host response. The role of inflammatory mediators and the cells that elaborate them will be discussed. (Quarter 5.).

PG 420. Advanced Pharmacology I. 1 Unit.

Local anesthesia and pain management of acute and chronic pain are main components of this lecture series, with specific emphasis on endodontics. Infection control, including biochemistry and side effects, is also presented. (Quarter 1.).

PG 520. Advanced Pharmacology II. 1 Unit.

Local anesthesia and pain management of acute and chronic pain are two main components of this lecture series, with specific emphasis on endodontics. Infection control, including biochemistry and side effects, is also presented. (Quarter 5.).