Academic Regulations

Graduate 

Conservatory of Music

Music Therapy

School of Engineering and Computer Science

Data Science

School of Health Sciences

Audiology

Professional

Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry

All regulations apply to the DDS and IDS Programs. Not all regulations apply to the Certificate or Dental Residency Programs. For more information, contact your program.

Undergraduate

Arthur A. Dugoni School of Denistry

Dental Hygiene

The Academic Regulations on this page are for the following graduate programs on the San Francisco campus.

Conservatory of Music

Music Therapy

School of Engineering and Computer Science

Data Science

School of Health Sciences

Audiology

All graduate students are urged to read these general regulations carefully. Failure to be familiar with this section does not excuse a student from the obligation to comply with all the described regulations. [Note: These regulations do not apply to students in the following degree programs:  DDS, MSD, JD and PharmD. For students in these programs, consult the respective program’s academic regulations. ]

Note that these Academic Regulations articulate minimum standards for graduate students at the University of the Pacific. Individual programs and schools/colleges may have additional requirements, so it is important for students also to know the particular policies and requirements of their individual degree programs. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this catalog, students are advised that the information contained in it is subject to change. The University reserves the right to modify or change the curriculum, admission standards, course content, degree requirements, regulations, tuition or fees at any time without prior notice. The information in this catalog is not to be regarded as creating a binding contract between the student and the school.

Academic Standing

All graduate students are expected to make satisfactory progress toward the academic degree for which they were admitted. Graduate students are required to maintain a cumulative minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and earn a grade of P (Passing) on all course work  required for the degree to remain in good standing.

Students enrolled in the Master of Physician Assistant Studies, the Master of Laws (LLM), or the Juris Scientiae Doctor (JSD) programs should refer to the Academic Standing policies of their specific program.

Minimum grade requirement

Only grades of A, B, C, and P are acceptable for graduate credit.  N is considered acceptable with respect to the minimum grade requirement.  Grades of C-, D, F, or NC (No Credit), are not accepted for graduate credit at University of the Pacific. (For definitions and more detail, see “Grading Policy” below.)

Students in a credential-only program must maintain a GPA of 2.5 and have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher to clear their credential. Students in a basic teacher education credential only program who wish to do directed teaching in an internship must maintain a 3.0 GPA. Academic standing is determined at the end of each term (or after completion of six units during summer) to be one of the following:

  • good standing
  • probation
  • dismissal

The criteria for these academic standings are based upon a combination of cumulative Pacific GPA and the term GPA. Criteria for the different academic standings are outlined below:

Probation:

Any graduate student who has completed six (6) or more course units of study and has a Pacific cumulative GPA below 3.0 or has earned a grade of NC in two separate terms is placed on academic probation. To be removed from probation, a student must achieve a cumulative 3.0 GPA (or higher GPA if required by the program) and not receive any grades of NC within completion of the next semester full-time course load (8 units or more).  For degree-seeking students, the courses included in the probation removal plan must be approved by the program faculty.  [Note: it is critically important for students to consult with the Financial Aid Office on the implications of academic probation on their financial aid].

Dismissal:

Students will be dismissed from their graduate program if either of the following apply:

  1. a student on probation fails to be removed from probation after the probationary period;
  2.  the GPA of a student who has previously been on probation falls below 3.0 or the student receives a grade of NC in any class.

A dismissed student may appeal for reconsideration and possible reinstatement on probation, within the same school.  Students who wish to appeal must follow procedures outlined in each program's policy.  If no program-specific procedure is outlined, students must submit a written petition to the Dean of their school.  Enrollment eligibility during appeals process is determined at the program level.

A dismissed student may not enroll in any graduate program for a minimum of 12 consecutive months (waiting period).  A student must reapply, meet current requirements for degree-seeking students, and be accepted by the University and the program to enroll for graduate studies following the waiting period.  Schools or programs may develop additional procedures or requirements related to re-enrollment following dismissal.  Some schools or programs may not permit reinstatement.  Please see the appropriate school or program sections of the catalog for specific requirements.

In addition to the academic standing, other academic and non-academic reasons can result in a student's dismissal from a graduate program.  Refer to each school's code of student conduct/responsibility or any program-specific guidelines.  In the absence of a school-specific code of conduct, the Honor Code in Tiger Lore applies.

Acquisition of Graduate Credit as an Undergraduate

Undergraduate students meeting all of the following requirements may apply by submitting the Application to Receive Graduate Credit as an Undergraduate Student to open a graduate transcript (i.e., receive credit in graduate-level courses toward a graduate degree) before the last day to add classes of the last semester as an undergraduate:

  • The student must be within 9 units of completing the baccalaureate degree.
  • The student must be in the last two semesters of the baccalaureate degree at University of the Pacific.
  • An Evaluation of Degree Requirements form has been submitted to the Office of the Registrar prior to the last day to add classes. This must be submitted before or with the Graduate Credit as Undergraduate application. (This serves as permission by the undergraduate advisor for the student to take graduate-level coursework.
  • The student has been accepted into a graduate or credential program.

Graduate credit can be received under the following guidelines:

  • The total number of graduate credits for the semester, including coursework completed at other schools, cannot exceed the maximum graduate course load for the department providing the graduate coursework.
  • The tuition rate for the entire semester is at the undergraduate rate.
  • No more than 12 units (16 units for student teachers) can be transferred from an undergraduate transcript into a graduate degree program.
  • Graduate credit will only be granted for graduate-level (200 numbered) courses and above.
  • Units cannot be retroactively transferred from an undergraduate transcript to a graduate program. Approvals for graduate credit must be obtained prior to the last day to add classes of the student's last semester.
  • Coursework will not count toward graduate credit if the student fails to complete the bachelor's degree by the second semester of taking graduate courses.
  • Graduate courses completed under this agreement will not be recorded by the Registrar as graduate coursework until the baccalaureate degree has been completed and matriculation into the graduate program has commenced. Grades from these courses will not be accounted in the undergraduate grade point average, unless the bachelor's degree is not completed. Students who do not complete the bachelor's degree by the second term when graduate courses are taken cannot start a graduate program and cannot take additional graduate coursework until the bachelor's degree has been awarded.
  • Students bear the responsibility of assuring graduate credits earned as an undergraduate student will transfer to or be counted as post-baccalaureate units by other universities or school districts.

Students are not classified as graduate students until they register for and begin graduate courses following the receipt of their bachelor’s degree.

Changing Degree Programs

Graduate students are admitted to University of the Pacific for a specific degree program.  With the exception of programs overseen by the same admission committee, if a student wishes to change a degree program, the student must submit a new application for admission, pay the application fee, and comply with all admission requirements.  No more than nine (9) units of coursework taken in non-degree seeking, certificate-seeking, or previous degree-seeking status may be applied to any Master's degree and no more than 12 units may be applied to any doctoral degree.  Students who wish to change degree programs overseen by the same admission committee may do so by using the Change of Program form available in the Registrar's Office.

Classification of Graduate Students

Full:  All students admitted with full graduate standing.

Conditional Admission: Students may be admitted to some of the graduate programs on a conditional admission basis.  See the Graduate Admission section of this catalog for additional information. 

Credential: Students admitted to do post-baccalaureate work that leads toward an initial teaching credential, specialist instruction credential or services credential.

Clinical Competency

Many of the graduate programs offered at the University include experiential coursework. Prior to taking a course that includes an experiential component, students are required to demonstrate that they have the necessary skills, aptitude and competencies to successfully complete the course. Faculty of departments that offer experiential courses have the discretion of denying or terminating enrollment in these courses to students evaluated as not possessing the necessary clinical competencies. Procedures used to assess clinical competency vary across programs. Students may obtain additional information from their Graduate Program Director.

Students who do not demonstrate adequate clinical and experiential competency can be dismissed from a degree program, regardless of academic standing.

Commencement

Master’s degree students who are near completion of degree requirements are eligible to participate in the May commencement exercises under the following conditions.

  • A completed Graduate Student Application for Graduation has been submitted by the fall deadline
  • All degree requirements will be met before the end of the last summer session of the same year. An approved plan of study that specifies all degree requirements will be completed in time and must be on file.
  • The Master's degree oral examination, which includes thesis defense or written examination (where applicable), will be successfully completed by the Spring semester deadline for Written/Oral Exam — Thesis/Dissertation Defense.
  • The student is in good academic standing.

On a case-by-case basis, special consideration is given for international students who complete degree requirements during the fall semester of the same calendar year. Approved Degree Evaluations must be on file by the spring semester deadline and the student must state they are unable to return to campus to participate in ceremonies in the spring following degree completion.

Doctoral degree students are ineligible to participate in graduation ceremonies until all degree requirements are met and the final dissertation has been approved.  However, on a case-by-case basis, special consideration will be given for international and domestic doctoral students who will complete degree requirements by the end of the fall semester of the same calendar year. Approved programs of study must be on file by the spring semester deadline, and the student’s Graduate Program Director must approve of the request.

Continuous Registration

All graduate students in graduate degree or credential programs must satisfy the Continuous Registration Policy of their respective programs from the time of admission until all degree requirements are met or their status as a degree- or credential-seeking student is terminated. This includes students who are completing preliminary or final examinations, or presenting terminal projects.  If degree or credential requirements are completed between terms, the student must have been registered during the preceding term.  International students may have additional registration requirements depending on their visa status and should consult with the Office of International Programs and Services to obtain current information.

Continuous registration is intended for students who have completed all required coursework. The Continuous Registration Policy can be met by registering for GRAD 200 (master's students) or GRAD 300 (doctoral students) through Inside Pacific at least one semester per academic year (Fall or Spring).

There is no limit to the number of times a student can register for GRAD 200/GRAD 300; however, Pacific’s Residency and Time Limit policies must be met.

Students enrolled in GRAD 200/GRAD 300 may utilize library facilities, but are not entitled to:

  • the use of other University facilities,
  • receive a fellowship, assistantship, or financial aid, or
  • take course work of any kind at the University of the Pacific. 

Students should also be aware that registration in GRAD 200/GRAD 300 or equivalent courses may cause existing student loans to come due. Please consult with the Office of Financial Aid.

Some programs may require courses other than GRAD 200/GRAD 300 (“equivalent courses”) to meet continuous registration requirements. Please consult individual program pages for additional information.

Failure to Meet Continuous Registration Requirements

A graduate student who fails to meet the continuous registration requirements will be inactivated. Students in good academic standing who were inactivated may petition for readmission to their original degree program by submitting the Application to Request Reinstatement.  Programs/Schools make the original admission decision and similarly make readmission decisions.  

Reinstatement will occur to current catalog. If reinstated, the student will be required to meet University and degree program admission and degree requirements that are in effect on the date of reinstatement, not the date of original admission.

Reinstatement requests must be accompanied by a plan for completing the degree within the maximum time allowed (see Residence and Time Limits).

A decision to reinstate a former student must be supported by the student's degree program.  The continuous registration requirement does not apply to students on approved leaves of absence (see below).

Course Audits

Eligible graduate courses may be audited only by students admitted to a graduate program who have the approval of the student’s advisor and of the instructor and dean (or designate) of the academic department where the course is offered. Audits are not available for courses in first-professional programs, unless by written permission of the program's dean. Students auditing a course must pay an audit fee and any special fees associated with the course. Audited courses cannot be retroactively converted to course credit unless officially changed to credit before the “Add Classes” deadline of the semester.

Course Loads

Course load refers to the number of units a student takes during a semester or trimester term.  While course-load requirements are program-specific (i.e., programs determine the minimum or maximum number of units students are required to take in a term), course load influences financial aid.  The following course load categories correspond to financial aid categories.

Full Time: 8 or more units per semester/trimester
Half Time: 4 to 7 units per semester/trimester
Less than Half Time: 1 to 3 units per semester

Students with teaching or other assistantships should check with their department for specific guidelines concerning unit requirements. Conditionally admitted students are not eligible for assistantships.

While the above Course Load categories are applicable to domestic students receiving financial aid, international students studying on an F-1 or J-1 visa must meet registration requirements for a “Full Course of Study,” as defined by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Education.  A “Full Course of Study” is defined on a semester/trimester basis, and students on F-1 or J-1 visas must meet at least one of the established criteria to obtain/maintain their visa:

•            8 units

•            6 units plus 20 hour per week assistantship

•            At least 1 unit of Internship, Research, Seminar, Thesis, or Dissertation

For additional information on “Full Course of Study,” please contact the Office of International Programs and Services.

Credit-by-Examination for Graduate Courses

A graduate student in good standing, or a student who has been accepted into one of University of Pacific’s graduate programs, which allows credit by examination, may request to take an exam in order to receive Credit by Examination (CbE) for one or more courses offered by a graduate program. Departments have the right to designate which, if any, of their courses are appropriate for CbE. This policy is subject to the following restrictions.

  1. A student may request CbE for a course covering material in which, through independent study, work experience, or work at another institution which was not accepted for transfer credit, the student feels prepared. It is the responsibility of the student to explain how the material was mastered.
  2. Students wishing to pursue CbE should not expect preparation support (tutoring, office hours, etc.) beyond a statement of the scope of topic coverage and expectations for passing the exam(s).
  3. A student wishing to pursue CbE for a course may not attend the class meetings of the course.
  4. A student cannot receive CbE for a course they have previously taken for academic credit.
  5. A student may not get CbE for a course in a structured sequence if the student has received credit for a higher level course in the sequence.
  6. A maximum of 9 units total may be earned by a student via CbE and/or transfer credit combined.

A student wishing to pursue the credit by examination option must:

  1. Complete the appropriate form from the office of the University Registrar;
  2. Obtain approval from his or her adviser, and the dean of the school or college offering the course;
  3. Pay the scheduled service fee.

Successful completion of the examination will be recorded on the transcript with a grade of Pass and will be made a part of the student’s academic record. This will occur in the semester in which the exam is taken, or in a subsequent semester as directed by the student’s graduate program, especially in the case where a candidate takes the exam before being a full-time graduate student.

Pending credit for having successfully passed the exam, can be used as justification for prerequisite overrides for courses which require the course to which CbE was earned. Appropriate tuition fees will be assessed.

Credit Limitations

Unless included in an approved dual degree or 2+3/3+3 accelerated program, a course can be applied toward only one degree, unless an exception is approved by the Academic Regulations Committee (ARC).Courses not applicable to graduate degrees:

  • Lower division undergraduate courses (001-099)
  • Courses in which a grade of C- or lower were received. Courses that receive a C- or lower must be repeated
  • Courses for the improvement of English language skills of foreign students
  • Directed teaching or prerequisite courses for directed teaching except for the Master of Education degree or the Master of Arts in Special Education degree.
  • Physical education activity courses.
  • Unclassified Status: No more than 12 units, no matter when they are earned, can be transferred from an “Unclassified” transcript into a graduate program.
  • Credit used toward a degree earned at another institution cannot be applied to a graduate degree at University of the Pacific.

Double-Listed Courses

In order to differentiate student responsibilities in courses double-listed between undergraduate/masters or masters/doctoral , there must be significant differentiation between the two levels with the more advanced course level evidencing additional rigor as denoted by higher level student learning outcomes and academic rigor with corresponding masters or doctoral level assignments and grading criteria indicated in the syllabus.  Masters students enrolled in courses double-listed as both undergraduate and masters level must register using the 200-level course number and complete all requirements in the course for masters level work.  Similarly, doctoral students enrolled in courses double-listed as masters and doctoral level must register using the 300-level course number and complete all requirements in the course for doctoral level work.

Grade Point Average

The Pacific grade point average is determined by adding the total quality points and by dividing the resultant sum by the total number of quality hours. As a general rule, the ratio is based on the number of letter graded units completed.

Grading Policies

Students enrolled in the LLM or JSD programs should refer to their program’s Grading Policies.

Symbols and Definitions

Graduate students are assigned grades in keeping with the following provisions.  Utilization of (+/-) is at the discretion of individual programs.

Symbol GPA Definition
A 4.0 Exemplary
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0 Satisfactory
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0 Marginal
C- 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0 Unsatisfactory
F 0.0 Failing
I Incomplete work due to extenuating and hardship circumstances which prevent the completion of the work assigned within the regular time of the term. Each incomplete grade assigned must be accompanied with a contract statement agreed to by both instructor and student as to: a) what work remains to be completed, b) how it is to be evaluated, and c) a time indicated for completion within six months. If work is not completed within six months, the instructor can indicate a grade in lieu of the F/NC which automatically would be imposed with failure to complete the work. All incompletes must be made up before the last day of the semester in which the student intends to graduate.
Symbol GPA Definition
N Deferred grading for thesis, dissertation or research work.
NC No credit recognition. Represents unsatisfactory work under pass/no credit option.
NG No Grade Received from the Instructor. Please contact the instructor.
P Passing work on the pass/no credit system. Approved only for certain courses and program of a college or school. Note: Research for thesis or dissertation the department may determine whether letter grades or pass/no credit grades are to be given. In seminar or comparable courses, letter grades or pass/no credit may be used.
W Authorized withdrawal from courses after the prescribed period.

Leave of Absence

Students experiencing life changing or catastrophic events are encouraged to request a leave of absence, especially if the Residence and Time Limits policy will be impacted.  Consideration for request submitted after the degree time limit has expired will be impacted by evidence of successful continuous progress towards the degree, programmatic changes, and faculty availability.  A student who is in good standing may petition for a leave of absence of no more than one academic year and the maximum number of Leave of Absence requests is two.  Requests for a leave of absence must be approved in advance by the faculty advisor or Program Director and the Dean of the school.  Once the petition is approved, the registration requirement will be set aside during the period of leave.  Leaves will be granted only under conditions that require the suspension of all activities associated with pursuing the degree including use of university facilities and faculty mentoring/advice.

Counting of the time to the completion of the degree ceases when a leave of absence is granted and resumes when the student re-enrolls to continue the program.  A student who returns to the University after an approved leave of absence will not be required to submit an application for readmission.

Unapproved Leaves of Absence may result in the student being required to re-apply to their program.  International students should visit the International Programs and Services to find out how a Leave of Absence may impact their stay or re-entry into the U.S.

Students in the LLM program should consult McGeorge School of Law policies.

Registration

Registration is the means by which an individual officially becomes a student at Pacific. Registrants are further identified by school/college of the University, degree status, classification and major.

All students must register by the last day to add or drop. Students are held accountable to complete every course for which they register. If it is necessary to add or drop a course, the student must complete the appropriate registration transaction by the last day such activity is allowed as published in the University Calendar.

After the add/drop deadline dates has passed (but prior to the end of the term) requests to add or drop courses must be made by special petition to the student’s respective school/college.

Requests to drop courses after the term must be made to the Academic Regulations Committee (ARC). In either case, petitions are only approved if it can be shown that the request is warranted due to some special situation or hardship. Courses approved to drop after the deadline appear on the student’s transcript with the notation “W” but do not count in the units earned or in the calculation of the grade point average.

Any petitions approved after the deadline dates are subject to a service fee. Tuition and fee refunds are based on the date a withdraw form is initiated in the Office of the Registrar.

Registration - Individualized Study

To register for Individualized Study (Independent Study course, Internships, or Practicum) students must use the Individualized Study Request form. This form is a written contract between students and faculty that specifies the nature of the work to be undertaken and the method of evaluation.  The form must have proper approval within the unit and be filed with the Office of the Registrar. An independent study course may not be taken in the same term in which a regular course in the same subject is offered.

Repeating of Courses and Grade Replacement Policy

For courses in which the grade earned is C- or lower, the units are counted for GPA purposes in a student’s degree program, and -- if required for the degree -- must be repeated. Some departments or programs have established higher grading standards which must be met by students in those programs. All grades earned in courses taken as a graduate student at the University are counted in the cumulative GPA.

Only courses with grades of “B-” or lower can be repeated. Once a course is completed with a grade of B or higher, the graduate student cannot repeat that course or any prerequisites for the course. When a course is repeated, grades from both the original and repeated attempt appear in the official records and transcripts.  A course can only be repeated once and programs determine the exact number of courses that can be repeated (up to 25% of courses required for a degree). The grade received in the repeated course is used for calculation of the Pacific grade point average.

Requirements for the Master’s degree

In addition to the requirements above, the following requirements apply specifically to the Master's degree. Additional degree requirements may also be in place for individual programs, so students are responsible for also following the policies and requirements of their particular program.

Total Units

Most Master's programs at University of the Pacific require a minimum of 30 units of approved graduate credit.

Degree Candidacy

Successful completion of 12 units with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.

Grade Point Average

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all work taken as a graduate student, either at the University of the Pacific or any other institution.  See the Grading Policy and Academic Standing sections, in addition to program-specific guidelines.

Exit Requirements

Comprehensive Examination/Capstone Experience/Creative Project/Thesis

Most programs have a culminating experience.  In addition to successful completion of all courses required for graduation, students may be required to pass a comprehensive examination taken during their final semester of enrollment or, if specified by the program, successfully complete a capstone experience or creative project or defend a thesis.

The thesis must be checked for plagiarism and approved by the thesis committee prior to the defense.

Students must be enrolled the semester in which the defense/final examination occurs.

(See individual program sections for more information).

Requirements for Terminal Degree Programs (Ph.D., Ed.D, and JSD)

The goal of terminal degree programs at the University of the Pacific is to provide students with a comprehensive discipline-specific knowledge base and extensive training in the methods of research/creative activity.  The programs are designed to encourage students to make contributions that advance their field of expertise.

Students are expected to demonstrate an ability to conduct independent research, and the ability to express thoughts clearly in both verbal and written and/or creative formats.  In order to earn a terminal degree, candidates must successfully complete all degree requirements, demonstrate a high level of professional skill and performance in their academic work and their internship experience (if required), and submit a dissertation, acceptable to the student's committee.  Specific program requirements can be found in the appropriate sections of the catalog.

Degree Candidacy

Successful completion of approved candidacy requirements are defined by the degree program (e.g., qualifying scholarly activities or preliminary examinations). With the exception of the JSD, doctoral degree program directors are responsible for written requests of advancement to candidacy when requirements are met, and final approval is the responsibility of the Dean of the school.

Grade Point Average

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all work taken as a graduate student, either at the University of the Pacific or any other institution.  See the Grading Policy and Academic Standing sections, in addition to program-specific guidelines.

Presentation of an Acceptable Dissertation

In order to be acceptable, the doctoral dissertation must be:

  1. a significant contribution to the advancement of knowledge and
  2. a work of original and primary research.

Final Oral Examination

When the dissertation is completed, candidates present themselves for the final examination to an examining committee, which consists of the candidate's advisor (who shall act as chair) and such other examiners as the advisor shall approve.  The examination is oral and deals intensively with the field of specialization in which the candidate's dissertation falls, though it need not be confined to the subject matter of the dissertation.  In order to be considered satisfactory, the report of the examining committee must be unanimously favorable.

(See individual program sections for more information). 

Residence and Time Limits

The period of residence involves students in a total commitment to their graduate program.

Completion of a minimum of one academic year of “residence work” is required for all graduate programs; i.e., the student must be registered for at least 4 units per semester for two semesters. Two summer sessions of at least 4 units each are considered the equivalent of one-half year of residence.

Time Limits for Master's Degrees

The requirements for a Master's degree must be completed within five (5) years subsequent to admission to the program.  The five-year period begins the first semester students are enrolled and is calculated from the date of degree conferral.  Credit that is more than five years old will not be counted toward a Master's degree.  Exceptions, provided the courses were completed at this university, will require strong justification in writing from the student requesting the exception as well as revalidation plan.  Written approval from the department, and the Dean of the school/college at which the degree is offered are required.  See revalidation process below.

Individual programs may have additional residency and time limit requirements, so students must also consult the particular program’s time limits policies.

Time Limits for Terminal Degrees

The requirements for a terminal degree must be completed within ten years subsequent to admission to the terminal degree program.  The ten-year period begins with the first semester students are enrolled and is calculated from the date of degree conferral.  Students have a maximum of five years to advance to candidacy and a maximum of five years from candidacy to successfully defend the dissertation.  Students who exceed the candidacy deadline may request an extension.  Candidacy extensions will require strong justification in writing from the student and should be accompanied by a plan of study for timely completion of all requirements for advancing to candidacy.  The extension must be approved by the student's advisor, the Program Director, and the Dean of the school.

Courses taken ten or more years prior to the comprehensive examination (terminal degree programs) do not apply towards the graduate degree and must be repeated or revalidated to satisfy the degree requirements.

Individual programs may have additional residency and time limit requirements.

Revalidation Request

If revalidation of expired courses is requested, the faculty advisor or Program Director recommend a revalidation plan.  Revalidation will verify that the student's knowledge in a specific subject area is current and documented.  Options for course revalidation include a written examination, a scholarly paper, a project, an annotated bibliography, a course retake, or other equally rigorous academic means appropriate to the discipline to determine the student learning outcomes have been met.

Revalidation request should be submitted on the Revalidation Request Form and accompanied by a written justification, revalidation plan, and documentation used for revalidation.  All revalidation request and plans must be approved by the student's advisor or Program Director, and the School/College Dean.  The student's advisor/Program Director and College Dean are responsible for determining whether the student demonstrated sufficient course knowledge necessary for successful course revalidation.  Successfully revalidated courses may be included in the student's plan of study.  Failure to follow all designated requirements of the revalidation agreement may result in dismissal from the program.  Graduate students will not be permitted to submit more than 12 units of the program's courses for revalidation.  Courses beyond the 12-unit limit will need to be retaken.  Only courses completed at University of the Pacific are eligible for revalidation.

Thesis and Dissertations

Many master’s degree programs and all doctoral programs require the completion of a thesis (master’s degrees) or dissertation (doctoral degrees) as partial fulfillment of an advanced degree. The Center for Teaching and Learning makes available to faculty and graduate degree candidates instructions for the preparation of theses and dissertations. The instructions are to be applied to all theses and dissertations submitted at University of the Pacific. Theses and dissertations must be submitted by the deadline dates published in the Academic Calendar.

Graduate programs have specific courses that must be taken for work on a thesis or dissertation and are graded on a Pass/No Credit basis.

Thesis or Dissertation Committee

This section outlines the general requirements for thesis or dissertation committees. Units and colleges may adopt additional program-specific criteria and guidelines.

Thesis or dissertation chair: Faculty chairing thesis or dissertation committees must be regular, full-time members of University of the Pacific's faculty in the student's graduate program, hold a terminal degree, and have demonstrated expertise to serve as a thesis or dissertation chair. Faculty members without supervisory experience must serve for at least one year as a co‐chair with an experienced advisor before they may be recommended to independently supervise thesis or dissertation research. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the college or school Dean.

Thesis or dissertation committee: The Thesis or Dissertation Committee is composed of a Chair and a minimum of 1 (thesis) or 2 (dissertation) other committee members. The number of committee members depends on the degree objective. All members of the committee must hold degrees at least equivalent to the degree being sought or have demonstrated expertise in the student's field of study. In addition to the committee chair, who must be a University of the Pacific faculty member, the committee member(s) may be selected from within the student’s school or college, from another school or college, or from another institution or organization with recognized expertise in the field or industry.

It is recommended that the committee be formed after a student selects a chair for their research and the faculty member agrees to chair. The student, in consultation with the chair, is responsible for contacting potential members of the committee, inviting members to serve, and seeking approval from advisor, department chair, and college or school Dean.

The responsibilities of the thesis or dissertation committee members are:

  1. providing the student with guidance in their thesis or dissertation research, 
  2. monitoring the student’s research progress of their thesis or dissertation research, and
  3. approving the content of the final thesis or dissertation.

In order to fulfill the above responsibilities, the committee should hold at least one meeting each semester.

Transfer Credit

Coursework completed at University of the Pacific or at other regionally accredited institutions of higher education since completion of the baccalaureate can be evaluated for transfer credit work with the following restrictions:

  • Up to nine (9) semester units can be transferred at the Master's level and up to 12 semester units at the doctoral level.
  • Only courses that qualify for graduate or first-professional credit by the transferring institution can be transferred.
  • Only courses in which a grade of B or better are eligible for consideration of transfer credit.  Some departments set higher standards and there are identified by individual program catalog sections.
  • The course work must be less than five years old for Master's degrees and less than 10 years old for Doctoral degrees at the time the University of the Pacific degree is awarded. Credit used toward a degree earned at another institution cannot be transferred to a graduate degree at University of the Pacific.
  • Extension courses do not qualify for transfer credit with the exception of university-approved transfer agreements.

Grade points earned in those courses are not counted in the student’s Pacific grade point average.  This process is initiated using the Degree Requirement Adjustment Form and must be approved by the Director of the Graduate Program and the Office of the Registrar.

Some programs may have more restrictive transfer credit policies.

Unclassified Graduate Students

Students may take graduate level courses as an unclassified graduate student if they meet the following:

  • Have a bachelor's degree or the equivalent from a regionally accredited institution or other international institution of acceptable standing
  • Apply using the First Time Unclassified Application and submit it to the Office of the Registrar

A maximum of 12 units (16 units for student teachers) taken as an unclassified graduate student will count toward a graduate-level program at University of the Pacific. Upon acceptance to the university, resident and transfer coursework are evaluated by school/department for applicability to degree.  Some programs/courses have restricted enrollment and are not open for enrollment for unclassified students.

Withdrawal from a Term or the University

Students who intend to completely withdraw from a term or from the university have to initiate the process in the Office of the Registrar. The withdrawal date used by Financial Aid for return of Title IV Aid calculation and the effective date used by Student Accounts for tuition refunds are based on the date of your notification to the Office of the Registrar. If a student intends to withdraw from a semester after the last day to withdraw, the withdrawal must be approved by the Academic Regulations Committee. Courses the student was registered for after the last day to drop appear on that student’s transcript with the notation “W” but do not count in the units earned or in the calculation of the grade point average. A student who only withdraws from a semester, has one more semester to remain in continuing active status. A student who has completely withdrawn from the University, must file a Petition for Reinstatement Form (with a $50 fee) available on the Graduate Admission web site. The deadline is August 1st for fall admission or December 1st for spring admission.

An official withdrawal from the University is the termination of rights and privileges offered to currently enrolled students, which include, but are not limited to, early registration.

Professional

The Academic Regulations on this page are for the following professional programs on the San Francisco campus.

Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry

All regulations apply to the DDS and IDS Programs. Not all regulations apply to the Certificate or Dental Residency Programs. For more information, contact your program.

All students and residents are urged to read these general regulations carefully. Failure to be familiar with this section does not excuse a student or resident from the obligation to comply with all described regulations.

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this catalog, students and residents are advised that the information contained in it is subject to change. The university reserves the right to modify or change the curriculum, admission standards, course content, degree requirements, regulations, tuition or fees at any time without prior notice. The information in this catalog is not to be regarded as creating a binding contract between the student and the school.

Academic and administrative policies set forth in this section are in force for students and residents during the academic year 2022-23. Students or residents who join a subsequent cohort for any reason are governed by the policies, requirements, and curriculum of the catalog in effect at the time of re-entry. The right to change academic programs, policies, and standards at any time without prior notice is reserved by the university. It is the student's or resident's responsibility to regularly consult this site for changes or modifications.

Catalog

A San Francisco campus catalog is published annually in the Spring by the Registrar’s Office.  The catalog describes all graduate, undergraduate, and first-professional programs offered on the San Francisco campus. 

Unless otherwise noted, policies described below apply to all academic programs under the authority of the dean of the School of Dentistry: first-professional programs (36- month and 24-month Doctor of Dental Surgery), graduate programs (Master of Science in Dentistry in Orthodontics, Master of Science in Dentistry in Endodontology), residency programs (Advanced Education in General Dentistry), and undergraduate programs (Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene).  All future programs housed in the School of Dentistry are governed by the policies presented here or, when warranted and approved by the dean, by policies developed locally.

Program abbreviations used in this section are:  DH (dental hygiene), DDS (36-month Doctor of Dental Surgery program), IDS (24-month Doctor of Dental Surgery Program), and MSD (27- month Master of Science in Dentistry in Orthodontics or Endodontology). The DDS and IDS programs are first-professional programs, DH is an undergraduate program, and the MSDs are graduate programs.  AEGD is a one-year first professional residency program.   

Registration

Registration at the School of Dentistry includes payment of tuition and fees, enrollment in courses, submission of all required application materials (including one official transcript of academic record from each college or university attended through the last completed quarter, semester, or summer session), and submission of required medical examination and clearance forms.   

In order to receive credit for coursework taken during a term, a student or resident must be properly registered during that term. Barring a written notice of withdrawal or a dismissal from the school, registration is assumed for all students and residents.

All DDS, IDS, and MSD programs offered through the School of Dentistry are lock-step sequential cohort models: all students in a cohort are enrolled in the same “block” of courses each term.  Because enrollees have no choice in selecting classes or sections of classes, dental school programs use a “block scheduling” process.   Students enrolled in the DDS, IDS, and MSD programs are registered each term for the appropriate block of courses by the Registrar’s Office.  DH students also take classes on the "block" schedule. These students register themselves with guidance from the program. 

Similarly, and as a function of the lock-step curriculum model, students enrolled in programs under the authority of the dean of the School of Dentistry are not allowed to add or drop courses except in extreme cases (usually a complete withdrawal from the program, see Withdrawal policy). For this reason, the School does not use add/drop dates common in traditional graduate and undergraduate programs.  The assistant or associate dean in the Office of Academic Affairs is authorized to approve student requests to drop selective (enrichment) courses after the established drop date.  If approved, the assistant or associate dean will direct the San Francisco Registrar’s Office to drop the course from the student’s academic record.  

Records & Transcripts

Upon written request by the student to the Office of the Registrar, an official transcript is issued to whomever is designated.  Students can request a transcript online, in person, or by mail. The official transcript shows all work completed to date. On the dental school transcript the DDS program is divided into four program years (the structure of all other U.S. DDS programs) and the IDS program is divided into three program years; the MSD and DH programs reflect years of study in the traditional manner. Students can access their unofficial transcript any time through Inside Pacific, the university portal.

Official transcripts from other institutions become the property of the university and are not reissued or copied for distribution to other institutions. Copies of transcripts of work completed at other institutions must be obtained from the originating institution.

Operating and Instructional Hours

The instructional hour is 50 minutes, beginning on the hour and ending at ten minutes to the subsequent hour.  The instructional day (for class, simulation lab, and patient care) is from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. unless otherwise noted.  Pre-doctoral dental clinic hours extend until 8:30 P.M. on Monday and Thursday.  Departmental and administrative offices are open from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday.

Quarterly Class Schedule

The School of Dentistry curriculum committee approves class schedules for DDS, IDS, and DH programs each term.  Upon review and approval by the committee, class schedules are posted on the school website.   Schedules for the MSD programs are approved annually by the Associate Dean of Oral Health Education.  

Attendance Policy

Students and residents at the School of Dentistry assume professional obligations which include regular and consistent attendance at all learning activities. This includes classroom, laboratory, seminar, and remedial instruction; written and oral examinations, quizzes, and practicals; and patient care experiences. Regular and consistent attendance is an essential qualification of all students and residents. A student or resident who in the judgment of the school fails to meet this qualification may be dismissed from school.

Course directors (or program directors of residency programs) determine a reasonable attendance policy specific to their course (or program), and must provide students or residents a written statement of such policy in the course syllabus.  Attendance policies may vary by course and department, and even by course within department, and it is the student’s responsibility to be aware of and adhere to course attendance policies. 

The student or resident is responsible for making up all work missed due to an absence. Faculty have sole discretion in determining whether and under what conditions missed work is to be made up.

Final exams must be taken as scheduled during finals week. 

  • Do not schedule interviews, mission trips, externships, family events, etc. during finals week. 
  • In fairness to classmates, and to ensure test security, a make‐up exam will be offered only in cases of personal or family emergency, or illness; proof of which must be documented with the Office of Academic Affairs. 
  • In the event that the student is not present for a final exam due to a documented case of personal or family emergency, or illness, a make‐up exam will be offered on one date only, after the original final exam, no later than the first two weeks of the subsequent quarter. Date to be determined by course director.  All students who miss the final exam are expected to take the make-up exam at the same time, on that date. 
  • Make‐up exams will be of similar difficulty level. They may be offered in an alternative format to the original, to be determined by the course director. Example: oral, essay, short answer, etc. 

Examinations not in finals week: 

  • Attendance at all other examinations, exercises and opportunities for which points are earned during the quarter, is mandatory. 
  • For scheduled events such as interviews, mission trips, etc., make-up examinations may be offered. 
  • Advise course director two weeks in advance of planned absence. 
  • Make‐up exam will be offered on one date only, after the original exam. Date to be determined by course director.  All students who miss an exam are expected to take the make up on that date. 
  • Make-up exams will be of similar difficulty level. They may be offered in an alternative format to the original, to be determined by the course director. Example: oral, essay, short answer, etc. 

Notification of Absence from School 

A student or resident who will be absent for all or part of an instructional day must notify the Office of Academic Affairs at dentalabsence@pacific.edu in advance of the absence or by 9:00 a.m. on the day of the absence.  Absences must be communicated daily. In the event of an emergency, the student or resident must notify Academic Affairs as soon as reasonably possible. The Office of Academic Affairs will notify faculty promptly of the student’s or resident’s absence and will maintain a log of absences.  The log will be circulated quarterly, or upon request, to course directors, program directors, and chairs.   

Grades

Grades represent passing or failing performance:  in general, grades of A, B, C, and D represent passing performance, and the grade of F represents failure. More specifically, grades of A (excellent performance); B (good performance); and C (acceptable performance) represent unconditional passing performance; the grade D indicates conditional passing performance that must be remediated.  Special conditions on D grades must be specified in writing (disposition form) to the Office of Academic Affairs when grades are submitted.  Conditions may include additional instruction or evaluation before advancement to clinical practice or eligibility for national or clinical board examinations. Course directors are required to provide a grade for every enrolled student at the end of each term of instruction.

Credit (CR)

In clinical and nonclinical courses, CR signifies satisfactory completion of a course where reliable differentiation among passing grades is not possible.  A credit grade (CR) may be awarded in clinical courses to indicate overall satisfactory progress OR when it is determined that a student has not been assigned sufficient patients for clinical ability to be fairly assessed.  A CR grade is also used for DDS and IDS students to record satisfactory completion of the PIP experience. 

Incomplete (INC)

An incomplete grade (INC) is given temporarily when a student or resident is progressing satisfactorily but the course director has insufficient information because the student or resident has not completed all assigned coursework for reasons beyond the student or resident’s control. The course director determines the conditions under which and the date by which the deficiency that caused the INC must be removed, and communicates that to the Office of Academic Affairs on the disposition form and to the Registrar’s Office. If no completion date is stipulated, by default the end date of the subsequent term is the completion date. Failure to comply with stated conditions by the stipulated date will result in the INC reverting to the grade F, failure.  Prior to posting an F grade, the Registrar’s Office sends to the dean the names of students whose grades will revert to F.  The dean has seven calendar days in which to intervene to prevent the posting of a failing grade.   No student may earn a diploma with a permanent INC or F in a core curriculum course. 

Grade Point Average

In computing a grade point average (GPA) numerical values are: A, 4 points; B, 3 points; C, 2 points; D or INC, one point; and F, zero points. Credit (CR) notations are not included in the grade point average calculation. Separate didactic and lab/clinic GPAs are used in the DDS and IDS programs. The dental school does not award "+" or "-" modification of grades and does not use the W grade.  A temporary placeholder ("^") is posted by the Registrar's Office in those courses where term grades are not received by the grade submission deadline.  The "^" placeholder is not included in GPA calculations. 

Change of Grades

Final passing grades (A, B, C, D, CR) are not subject to change on the basis of second examination or additional work completed after grades are submitted. Passing grades may be changed to correct an error in computation or when some part of a student's work has been overlooked within one term of issuing the final grade. A failing grade of F in a permanent course may be changed only on the basis of successful formal remediation or repeat of the course.  The decision to remediate or repeat is at the discretion of the course director or the Student Academic Performance and Promotions Committee.  Formal remediation at the conclusion of a course requires enrollment in a dedicated, unit-bearing, transcripted remedial course created and managed by the Registrar’s Office.  Upon successful completion of remediation, defined as a C or higher grade in the remedial course, the Registrar’s Office changes the F grade in the original course to a D (a pound symbol # precedes the D grade indicating the grade history in the course; see below).  No formal change of grade form is required. 

All grade changes and removals of incompletes needed to complete degree requirements must be on file in the Office of the Registrar within one month after the last day of finals in students' last term at Pacific. Corrections to academic records, including change of grade due to faculty or clerical error, are allowed only within thirty days following the granting of the degree. After this deadline records are considered official and no further amendments are allowed.

Academic Performance

Academic Progress

The Office of Academic Affairs reviews academic performance for all DDS, IDS, and DH students each term. In a course that continues through two or more terms, a grade is awarded each term to indicate interim progress, and the final grade for the entire course is awarded at completion of the last term of the course. However, the Academic Advisory and Student Academic Performance and Promotions Committees regard an interim grade in the same manner as a final grade with respect to promotion. 

Academic Good Standing

For DDS, IDS, and DH students academic good standing requires a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 for all didactic courses attempted or completed and for all laboratory and clinic courses attempted and completed, and no permanent D or F grades.  In some programs under the authority of the dean of the School of Dentistry, only a single term GPA may be used, in which case a minimum of 2.0 is required to be in good academic standing.

Students who are in good academic standing are automatically recommended to the dean for promotion by the Student Academic Performance and Promotions Committee.  The committee may recommend that a student who is not in good academic standing be promoted on academic probation with conditions of the probation clearly outlined (see Academic Probation section below).

Academic Probation

Academic probation is accorded to a DDS, IDS, or DH student upon receipt of a GPA below 2.0 for all didactic courses attempted and completed OR a GPA below 2.0 for all laboratory and clinic courses attempted and completed OR both; OR to a student with a permanent D or F grade. (Program directors in graduate, postdoctoral, and other first-professional programs under the authority of the dean of the School of Dentistry may adopt these policies or determine an appropriate review process for their respective program, which must be approved by the dean and communicated to students.) The GPAs reflected on the term report card are cumulative and include all courses attempted and completed.  Normally, the standard for good academic standing must be met within one term of being placed on academic probation. In circumstances where this time constraint cannot be met, e.g. for laboratory and clinic grades at the beginning of the second year, or when a course is repeated to remediate an F grade, a reasonable time period will be specified. 

The committee may recommend that a student who is not in academic good standing be promoted on academic probation with conditions of the probation clearly outlined.

I. Phase One Academic Probation: Intervention
  1. Cumulative didactic and/or lab/clinic GPA below 2.0 if the student was in good academic standing the previous term. (New incoming first-year students are assumed to be in good standing upon matriculation unless otherwise stipulated by the Office of Student Services or the program director.)
  2. Repeating students are placed on intervention at the beginning of their repeat year.
  3. Examples of interventions include:
    • meetings with advisor
    • assignment of tutors
    • inventory of outside activities, living conditions
    • diagnostic testing for suspected health, psychological, language, or learning problems
    • in-course remediation
    • alternative career counseling
II. Phase Two Academic Probation: Contract
  1. Second consecutive term of a cumulative didactic and/or lab/clinic GPA below 2.0, or
  2. Any permanent D or F grade.
  3. Examples of contract conditions include:
    • required weekly meetings with faculty member, Group Practice Leader, or advisor
    • restrictions on outside activities, living conditions
    • required professional assistance with diagnosed health, psychological, or learning problems
    • tutors
    • assignment to scheduled supplemental courses
    • alternative career counseling
  4. No student on contract is eligible to take the Integrated National Dental Board Examination without approval from the Student Academic Performance and Promotions Committee.

Academic Disqualification

Academic disqualification may be recommended to the dean by the Student Academic Performance and Promotions Committee for a student who has failed to meet any condition of phase two probation (contract). When a student's cumulative academic record meets published criteria for academic disqualification, the SAPPC will provide an opportunity for the student to appear before it to ensure that all pertinent information is available before the committee makes its recommendation to the dean. This is the only opportunity for the student to present relevant information to the committee; if a student fails to provide all pertinent information at this opportunity, the student risks exclusion of information from the committee's deliberations. A student appearing before the committee has the option to: (i) select a faculty advisor; (ii) request and receive assistance from that faculty advisor with preparation of a statement to the committee; and (iii) request the faculty advisor attend the committee meeting with the student as a silent observer. A student may, at their discretion, take advantage of all or none of these opportunities. During the committee meeting, the student is advised to read aloud their prepared statement, but is discouraged from circulating copies or presenting evidence of academic performance.

If after consideration of the relevant information available to it, the committee judges that the student has the capacity and commitment to overcome his or her documented deficiencies and reach an acceptable level of performance, the committee may recommend (i) continuation on academic contract; (ii) extension of the program; or (iii) re-enrollment in a subsequent cohort. Similarly, the committee may also recommend re-enrollment only through the normal admissions process, after a careful review of the relevant information and as appropriate to the student's potential. If a student is offered and elects to re-enroll in a subsequent cohort, the dean's letter signed by the student electing the re-enrollment option suffices as evidence of readmission.

Exemption from Courses

If a student or resident has extensive educational preparation in a discipline, the student or resident may petition the appropriate course or program director for exemption from required coursework. Such exemption may be granted at the discretion of the course or program director who will award an appropriate final letter grade (A, B, C, D), or credit (CR) signifying completion of the required course.

Examination Review Policy

At a minimum, course directors in all programs housed in the School of Dentistry must report to students and residents their individual score, class average, distribution of grades, and the scale used for scoring.  Course directors must make this information available to students within 7 calendar days following an examination, quiz, or practical examination.  This may take one of three forms: release of the full examination to students; release of an individual Strength & Opportunities report (DDS, IDS, DH only); or an exam review session held at a reasonable time.  In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), if a student asks to see an examination at any time, and the examination is in possession of the course director or other administrative person, the examination must be produced. 

Academic Standards for Holding Student Office

In order to run for and/or hold elected or appointed office in the Associated Student Body or to assume a leadership position in an organization affiliated with and approved by the school, a student must:

  • be registered for a full-time course of study,

  • be in good academic and disciplinary standing (no recorded ethics sanctions)

  • maintain a cumulative combined Grade Point Average of 2.5 or higher

  • have no failing grades

  • not be repeating a course(s) .

These conditions must be met throughout the entire period of time in which the student holds office. 

Failure to meet the academic standards outlined by this policy will result in a one quarter probationary period, during which the student is expected to meet the minimum cumulative GPA standard as well as the other academic expectations as outlined above.  Failure to do so by the end of the probationary period will lead to automatic resignation from office.


When one course is repeated by a student who remains with the original cohort, BOTH attempts are permanently recorded on the transcript.  Repeated courses are identified on the transcript with a "Y" in the repeat column, and the interim, if applicable, and permanent grade earned is INCLUDED in the Grade Point Average calculation (“grade averaging”).  The original course remains on the transcript and the repeated course appears in the term(s) it is repeated. 

When a student repeats an entire academic year, BOTH attempts are permanently recorded on the transcript.  Repeated courses are identified on the transcript with a "Y" in the repeat column, but interim, if applicable, and permanent grades earned in the first attempt are NOT included in the GPA calculation ("grade replacement").  Immediately prior to re-enrollment with a new cohort, the transcript is adjusted such that all courses taken during the original enrollment period are temporarily suppressed from the transcript until such time that grades, interim and permanent, are posted.  This process is the responsibility of the Registrar’s Office.

In the absence of a written agreement of exemption filed in the Office of Academic Affairs, students who join a subsequent cohort for any reason are governed by the policies, requirements, and curriculum in effect at the time of re-entry.

Withdrawal

A student who wishes to withdraw must must promptly notify the Office of Academic Affairs or the program director in writing.   A student's request for withdrawal becomes final only upon completion of the customary check-out process.  For predoctoral students, the student's academic standing at the completion of the check-out process will be recorded on the permanent record (transcript) as a transcript comment.  (The dental school does not use the W grade so as not to negatively impact future admission into a health professions program.)   The comment contains month and year of withdrawal and reference to academic standing at the time of withdrawal, e.g., Jun 15: student withdrew on academic probation.  

The transcript of a student who withdraws without formal written notification of intent to withdraw will record a dismissal in the transcript note: e.g. Jun 15: student disqualified for unauthorized LOA. A student who has met the published criteria for disqualification may not elect to voluntarily withdraw until the dean has rendered a final decision regarding promotion or academic standing. In these cases, the Office of Academic Affairs will inform the Registrar’s Office of the appropriate transcript designation.

Leave of Absence

Requests for a leave of absence are submitted to the dean or program director, who will designate the appropriate administrator to evaluate and respond to the request.  (A program director must consult with the Dean’s Office before granting a leave of absence.)  To request a leave of absence, the student must be in good academic standing and must submit a written request identifying persuasive reasons warranting the leave, together with documentation supporting the request. The dean or program director will notify the student in writing of the decision and, if approved, will stipulate the length of the leave and conditions for re-enrollment. The student assumes the responsibility of keeping the dean or program director informed of the intent to re-enroll by the specified date.  A student who does not re-enroll by the specified date will be considered to have withdrawn from the school. The decision to deny, grant, or set conditions for a request for leave of absence shall be in the sole discretion of the dean. Leaves of absence are rarely granted.  The Office of Academic Affairs will notify the Registrar’s Office of the details of an approved LOA so that an accurate transcript comment can be posted to the record.  

The dean has the authority to unilaterally place a student on interim or indefinite leave of absence after careful review of the facts of a case and to determine tuition charges in effect during the LOA. 

Graduation

In addition to all other requirements for graduation, the candidate must demonstrate competence to discharge the duties required of a practitioner of general dentistry or a dental speciality (orthodontics, endodontology, AEGD).  In addition to the skills, knowledge, and values expected of a beginning practitioner, this is interpreted to mean evidence of moral character compatible with the public interest and the practice of the healing arts, completion of all technical and clinical requirements prescribed in the curriculum, good academic standing, a passing score on the Integrated National Board Dental Examination (DDS students only), and compliance with all relevant policies of the School of Dentistry.  If, in the opinion of the Student Academic Performance and Promotion Committee or other certifying body, approved by the dean, the candidate for the degree has met all these requirements, it is authorized to recommend to the dean conferral of the degree. The committee may also recommend delay in the individual's graduation date and will stipulate conditions necessary to bring the student or resident to a competent level (tuition for extended students begins in the second quarter of extension; see Tuition & Fees section of this catalog). Students and residents who have met all degree requirements receive their diploma at commencement.   

Graduation Honors

Upon recommendation of the Student Academic Performance and Promotion Committee, predoctoral students who complete the didactic, clinical, and national board requirements for graduation and whose academic record qualifies them for election to Tau Kappa Omega are graduated with honors. Those who complete graduation requirements and whose record qualifies them for election to Omicron Kappa Upsilon are graduated with high honors. The valedictorian is graduated with highest honors.

Committees

Student Academic Performance and Promotions Committee (SAPPC)

Functions: reviews the academic performance and progress of students in the 24- and 36-month DDS program and dental hygiene program every quarter; determines satisfactory progress, overall competency, and eligibility for graduation; recommends to the dean students who are not eligible to graduate or should be dismissed for academic reasons with or without the option of automatic re-enrollment; meets with students who have met grounds for academic dismissal to evaluates the student’s capacity to continue in the program and likelihood for success; and proposes and causes to be designed and implemented remediation, enrichment opportunities, and assessment methodology geared toward supporting student learning and assessing overall competency.  The committee helps ensure enforcement of academic standards described in this catalog.

Membership consists of the associate dean of oral health education (chair), the associate dean for clinical services, the assistant dean for academic affairs, all Group Practice Leaders, all department chairpersons, and a representative of the DH program. Should a clinical department chair be unable to attend the meeting, a single co- or vice-chair is invited.

Academic Advisory Committee (AAC)

Functions: reviews report cards of students on academic probation and determines appropriate intervention strategies; devises conditions of academic intervention and contract documents; and, when a student meets the published grounds for academic dismissal, make a recommendation to the Student Academic Performance and Promotion Committee on continued enrollment status.

Membership consists of he associate dean of oral health education, the assistant dean for academic affairs (chair), two Group Practice Leaders, one representative each of the biomedical science courses and preclinical technique courses, a representative of the DH program, and one predoctoral student.

Student Appeals Committee

Functions:  Reviews student-initiated challenges to faculty action on grading and promotion decisions to ensure due process.  The Student Appeals Committee (SAC) does not re-hear cases previously decided by the Student Academic Performance and Promotions Committee (SAPPC) and does not substitute its judgment for the academic judgment of faculty or of the administration. 

Process:  The chair evaluates whether all procedures of the SAPPC were maintained in the process leading up to the SAPPC decision.  This evaluation helps to confirm that the student has been afforded due process in the decision.  The Chair’s evaluation reviews all steps taken during the review process to ensure that all procedures and decisions based on the submitted documentation and testimony were applied in a manner consistent with the process afforded all student appeals filed with the SAC. The chair convenes the full committee to consider the appeal only if the chair decides a due process error was made that may have affected the SAPPC’s decision.  Since communication regarding the student’s education and patient care is necessary during an ongoing appeal, the following persons may be updated on the appeals process prior to a decision: the Dean, the Executive Associate Dean, the Associate Dean of Oral Health, the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, the Associate Dean of Clinic, and the department chair(s) in which the student is enrolled during the appeal

Membership consists of three full-time elected faculty members (and four alternates) and four elected students (with class vice presidents serving as alternates): one each from the two predoctoral senior classes, one from the junior predoctoral class, and one from the DH program. Three faculty members and two student members constitute a hearing panel.  The chair does not vote in matters before the committee. 

Awards

Awards and prizes are presented annually at the graduate-alumni banquet honoring the graduating classes or similar venue. A detailed description of each award, including selection criteria, is available in the Office of Academic Affairs.

Academic Achievement

Dean's Valedictorian awards (DDS, IDS)
Dean's Salutatorian awards (DDS, IDS)
Dean's Award (third highest GPA)
Inesi Award in Physiology
OKU-Sutro  Clinical  Excellence  

Leadership, Professionalism, Scholarship, and Service

Dr. Sigmund Abelson Endowment award Academy of General Dentistry award
American College of Dentists, Northern California Section award American Student Dental Association Award of Excellence
Dr. Thomas R. Bales Family Endowment Good Samaritan Award
California Dental Association award
Delta Dental Plan of California Student Leadership award
Dr. Deric Desmarteau Endowment award
Dr. Kevin Campbell Alumni Association Service award
F. Gene and Rosemary Dixon IDS Endowment award
Pierre Fauchard Academy awards
Dr. William W.Y. Goon OKU award
International College of Dentists Student Leadership award
San Francisco Dental Society Ethics award
Dr. Charles, Charles Jr. and Joe Sweet Scholarship awards (for pediatric dentistry)
Dr. Herbert K. Yee Scholarship award

Outstanding Performance

Academy of Osseointegration award
Advanced Education in General Dentistry Outstanding Resident award
Dr. Eric B. Bystrom Memorial award
Academy of Operative Dentistry award
American Academy of Implant Dentistry award
American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology award
American Academy of Oral Medicine award
American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology award
American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology award
American Academy of Esthetic Dentistry award
American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry award
American Academy of Periodontology award
American Association of Endodontics award
American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Dental Student awards
American Association of Oral Biologists award
American Association of Orthodontics award
American Association of Public Health Dentistry award
American College of Prosthodontists award
American Dental Society of Anesthesiology award
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons of California award
Dentsply/American Dental Association Student Research Program award
Dr. Charles A. Ertola award (for removable prosthodontics)
Dr. Thomas B. Hartzell award (for periodontics)
International Congress of Oral Implantologist award
Lasky Family Endowment Pediatric awards
Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology award
Quintessence Publishing Co. awards (one each for research achievement, periodontics, and restorative dentistry)
Warren Family Endowment award (for pediatric dentistry)

Honor Societies

Phi Kappa Phi

Each year DDS, IDS, and DH students who demonstrate the highest academic achievement are inducted into Phi Kappa Phi, a national multi-disciplinary honor society.

Omicron Kappa Upsilon

The Delta Delta chapter of the national dental honor fraternity, Omicron Kappa Upsilon, was organized at the dental school in 1934. Its purpose is to encourage scholarship and to advance ethical standards of the dental profession. Membership is limited to twelve percent of the graduating DDS and IDS classes, selected by a faculty vote on the basis of scholarship and character. OKU members are awarded the "high honors" distinction at graduation.     

Tau Kappa Omega

In 1927, the Alpha Chapter of an undergraduate honor society, Tau Kappa Omega, was organized for promotion of honor and service to the school. DDS, IDS, and DH students are elected to the fraternity on the basis of ideals and scholarship.  TKO members are awarded the "honors" distinction at graduation. 

Reservation of Powers

The School of Dentistry reserves the right to modify or change the curriculum, admission standards, course content, degree requirements, regulations, policies, procedures, tuition, and fees at any time without prior notice and effective immediately. Students who join a subsequent cohort for any reason are governed by the policies, requirements, and curriculum of the catalog in effect at the time of re-entry.

The information in this catalog is not to be regarded as creating an express or implied agreement between the student (or applicant) and the school, nor does its content limit the academic and administrative discretion of the school's administration.

The Academic Regulations on this page is for the following undergraduate program on the San Francisco campus.

Arthur A. Dugoni School of Denistry

Dental Hygiene

All students are urged to read these general regulations carefully. Failure to be familiar with this section does not excuse a student from the obligation to comply with all the described regulations.

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this catalog, students are advised that the information contained in it is subject to change. They should therefore consult the Registration Information section of the Office of the Registrar web page for any term to relate these regulations to calendar dates. The University reserves the right to revise its regulations and programs in accord with sound academic standards and requirements.

Academic Residence Requirement

The minimum residence requirement for a bachelor’s degree program requires 32 out of the last 40 units to be earned in residence at University of the Pacific. This means once a student has reached 40 units less than what is required for his/her degree only 8 more units may be accepted from a four year accredited institution. Additional community college or four year institution courses satisfy content requirements only and do not apply to the minimum units required for the degree. Example: If 124 units are required for the degree once a student has reached 84 units, only 8 more units can transfer in (from a four year accredited institution). If 128 units are required for the degree once a student has reached 88 units, only 8 more units can transfer in.

Normally these 32 units must be taken on the Stockton campus, but study in Pacific-affiliated programs elsewhere in the United States or abroad may count toward the residency requirement if the student has taken at least 32 units on the Stockton campus at the time of graduation.

The school or college from which the student is to graduate may stipulate that the units in residence must include certain specific requirements in the major program and/or a certain minimum of units within the school or department of the major.

Academic Standing

At the end of each semester, an undergraduate or professional pharmacy student’s academic standing is designated as one of the following: good standing, good standing with warning, probation, subject to disqualification (temporary status) or disqualification. The criteria for these academic standings are based upon a combination of the cumulative Pacific GPA and the term GPA and vary according to a student’s classification. Unless admitted on probation, a student is in good standing during the first semester of attendance. Students who are subject to disqualification are reviewed by an appropriate committee and are either disqualified from further enrollment at the University or are allowed to continue for the next semester on probation. The criteria for the different academic standings are outlined below:

Good Standing:

  • term GPA of 2.00 or higher and a cumulative Pacific GPA of 2.00 or higher

Good Standing with Warning:

  • term GPA below 2.00 and a cumulative Pacific GPA of 2.00 or higher.

Probation:

If prior semester is ‘Good Standing’:

  • Freshman-Junior: term GPA is below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 2.00

If prior semester is ‘Good Standing with Warning or ‘Probation’:

  • Freshman: term GPA is below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA between 1.50 and 1.99
  • Sophomores: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA between 1.80 and 1.99
  • Juniors: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA between 1.95 and 1.99
  • All undergraduates: term GPA of 2.00 or higher and cumulative Pacific GPA below 2.00

Subject to Disqualification (temporary status):

If prior semester is ‘Good Standing’:

  • Seniors: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 2.00

If prior semester is ‘Good Standing with Warning’ or ‘Probation’:

  • Freshmen: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 1.50
  • Sophomores: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 1.80
  • Juniors: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 1.95
  • Seniors: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 2.00

Disqualified:

Each school determines whether a student subject to disqualification is disqualified. If not disqualified, a student subject to disqualification is placed on probation for the following term. If disqualified, a student is not allowed to register for further study at the University during a regular term while disqualified, but may attend the “open enrollment” summer sessions.

A student who has been disqualified may appeal immediately for reconsideration and possible reinstatement on probation within the same school or college or in another school or college of the University. A disqualified student who has been out of the University for one semester or more, excluding summer terms,  may apply for readmission to the University through the Office of Admission. If readmitted, such a student enters on probation and needs to make up the earlier deficiency in order to attain good academic standing.

Acquisition of Graduate Credit as an Undergraduate

Undergraduate students meeting all of the following requirements may apply by submitting the Application to Receive Graduate Credit as an Undergraduate Student to open a graduate transcript (i.e., receive credit in graduate-level courses toward a graduate degree) before the last day to add classes of the last semester as an undergraduate:

  • The student must be within 9 units of completing the baccalaureate degree.
  • The student must be in the last two semesters of the baccalaureate degree at University of the Pacific.
  • An Evaluation of Degree Requirements form has been submitted to the Office of the Registrar prior to the last day to add classes. This must be submitted before or with the Graduate Credit as Undergraduate application. (This serves as permission by the undergraduate advisor for the student to take graduate-level coursework.
  • The student has been accepted into a graduate or credential program.

Graduate credit can be received under the following guidelines:

  • The total number of graduate credits for the semester, including coursework completed at other schools, cannot exceed the maximum graduate course load for the department providing the graduate coursework.
  • The tuition rate for the entire semester is at the undergraduate rate.
  • No more than 12 units (16 units for student teachers) can be transferred from an undergraduate transcript into a graduate degree program.
  • Graduate credit will only be granted for graduate-level (200 numbered) courses and above.
  • Units cannot be retroactively transferred from an undergraduate transcript to a graduate program. Approvals for graduate credit must be obtained prior to the last day to add classes of the student's last semester.
  • Coursework will not count toward graduate credit if the student fails to complete the bachelor's degree by the second semester of taking graduate courses.
  • Graduate courses completed under this agreement will not be recorded by the Registrar as graduate coursework until the baccalaureate degree has been completed and matriculation into the graduate program has commenced. Grades from these courses will not be accounted in the undergraduate grade point average, unless the bachelor's degree is not completed. Students who do not complete the bachelor's degree by the second term when graduate courses are taken cannot start a graduate program and cannot take additional graduate coursework until the bachelor's degree has been awarded.
  • Students bear the responsibility of assuring graduate credits earned as an undergraduate student will transfer to or be counted as post-baccalaureate units by other universities or school districts.

Students are not classified as graduate students until they register for and begin graduate courses following the receipt of their bachelor’s degree.

Auditing a Class

Auditing of a course is an option that allows exposure to a course with no course credit awarded. To audit a course, approval must be granted by both the instructor and the chair of the department in which the course is offered via an add/drop form. Auditing is not available in participation courses such as applied music, physical education, art courses of an applied nature, etc. Students auditing a course must pay an auditing fee. Courses taken through auditing may not subsequently be converted to a course credit or grade. The student must indicate at the time of registration if they wish to audit a course, and pay the appropriate fee. An audited course and grade AU (Audit) may not be used to fulfill or waive any degree requirements.  An AW (Audit Withdrawal) grade will be assigned for withdrawals.

Cancellation

If you are a newly admitted and confirmed student and do not wish to attend Pacific for a semester and instruction has not yet begun, you must formally request a cancellation of your registration from the university. To cancel your registration (prior to the start of the term) contact the Office of Admission. If you are a continuing student and need to drop your last class after the add/drop deadline you must visit the Office of the Registrar and obtain a date of notification recorded on the Withdrawal form. The notification date is your official withdrawal date used by Financial Aid in the Return of Title IV Aid calculation and the effective date used by Student Accounts for tuition refunds.

Catalog Expiration and Requirements Policy

The catalog lists requirements for active degrees offered by the university. Each catalog goes into effect at the beginning of the fall term the academic year of issue. It expires at the end of summer session the seventh academic year after publication for students maintaining attendance. Advisors and other university employees are available to help, but students have final responsibility for satisfying degree requirements for graduation.

Students are held to program requirements (general education and major/minor) in effect at the time of first enrollment. Students who change their program/major are held to degree requirements in effect at the time of the change of program. Students may, using a Change of Program form, elect to graduate under degree requirements specified in subsequent catalogs; under no circumstances are the requirements from an earlier catalog applied.

Change of Address

All students must notify the Office of the Registrar immediately of any change in their addresses or those of their parents or guardians. The University assumes no responsibility for materials sent through the mail not received.

Change of Program Objectives

A student who has been admitted to one degree program and who later desires to change to another degree, major, concentration, or subsequent catalog must submit an approved Change of Program form with the Office of the Registrar.

Class Attendance

Students are expected to attend classes regularly. Specific attendance policies are determined and provided by individual instructors in their course syllabus at the beginning of the semester.

Class Standing

Undergraduate students are designated freshmen, sophomores, juniors or seniors by the number of units which have been completed toward graduation as follows:

1 – 27.99 units designates a freshman.

28 – 55.99 units designates a sophomore.

56 – 91.99 units designates a junior.

92 – up units designates a senior.

Post Baccalaureate

Other students are classified as Undergraduate Unclassified. See the Undergraduate Unclassified section of this catalog.

Commencement

Commencement exercises to honor students who have earned baccalaureate and professional pharmacy degrees are held each year in May. Students who have earned their degrees in the previous Fall or Summer terms are welcome to participate.

Undergraduate students who have not completed all their degree requirements may participate in commencement if they have accumulated 92 units by the end of the Fall semester prior to May commencement. Students with deficiencies who plan to participate in the May commencement ceremony must apply for graduation by the April deadline.

Course Loads

Fall and Spring Semesters (Undergradaute and Professional Pharmacy students)

Full Time: 12 or more units a semester

Half Time: 6 -11.9 units a semester

Less than Half Time: 5.9 or less a semester

Twelve units constitute a minimum full-time program of studies during a semester for the regular undergraduate and first professional level student and is the minimum required for participation in intercollegiate activities. If a student registers for fewer than 12 units or drops below 12 units financial aid may be reduced. (Students who are less than half-time are not eligible for financial aid.)

The maximum study load during a semester for undergraduates without special permission is 18 units and 19 units for first professional level students. Students who wish to enroll for units in excess of the maximum study load must petition their school/college in advance.  Approval is based to a great extent upon the student’s past academic record and results in additional tuition charges. If a student is approved to take courses concurrently at another institution, the units at Pacific and the other institution may not exceed 18 units during Fall and Spring or 8 units during each Summer Sessions.

Minimum and maximum study loads for graduate students are defined in the Graduate Catalog.

Course Numbering System

Undergraduate Courses:

Lower Division courses. Courses, numbered 001 – 099, are primarily designed for freshmen and sophomores.

Upper Division courses. Courses, numbered 100 – 199, are typically open to students who have met the necessary prerequisites as indicated in the catalog course description. These courses are designed primarily for juniors and seniors but exceptions may be appropriate for qualified sophomores.

Graduate Courses:

Courses numbered 200 – 399 are primarily designated for graduate students. 300 and above are primarily for students admitted to a doctoral program.

Courses numbered in the 9000 series are used for specific professional development courses that are graduate level, non-degree courses in the Center for Professional and Continuing Education.

Credit by Examination

An undergraduate student in good standing and currently enrolled for four or more units may “challenge” by examination certain courses offered in the current term by the University. Departments have the right to designate which of their courses are appropriate for credit by examination. This policy is subject to the following restrictions:

  1. A student may challenge a course covering material in which, because of independent study since high school graduation, or because of work at another college or university which was not accepted for transfer credit, the student feels prepared. It is the responsibility of the student to explain how the material was mastered.
  2. A student who wishes to challenge a course should not expect the instructor of the course to provide assistance beyond an explanation of the scope of the examination.
  3. A student who wishes to challenge a course may not attend the class meetings of the course.
  4. A student may not receive credit by examination in the semester in which the student intends to receive his or her baccalaureate degree.
  5. A student may not get credit by examination for a course which the student has already audited or failed with a grade of F or NC.
  6. A student may not get credit by examination for a course in a structured sequence if the student has received credit for a higher level course in the sequence.
  7. Credit earned by a challenge examination may not be used to meet the University residency requirement.

A student pursues the credit by examination option must obtain a Credit by Examination form from the Office of the Registrar and pay the scheduled $50.00 service fee (non-refundable).

Successful completion of the examination is then recorded on the transcript with a grade of pass and is made a part of the student’s academic record in the term in which the examination is requested. Students who pass the exam are charged an additional $200.00 for the course credit. Such credit is not considered to generate an overload.

Credit Limitations

Undergraduate students can apply a combined total of eight units of ACTY 002-049 General Activity, ACTY 050-099 - Intercollegiate Sports and THEA 005 in the Theatre Arts Department toward graduation. Up to 8 units of activity and intercollegiate sports classes may count toward the COP breadth requirement.

A total of no more than 20 units may be applied toward a degree from any or all of the following: courses taken in accredited correspondence schools, extension correspondence schools, extension courses, and/or courses taken credit by examination. None of these credits, except extension courses taken at the University, is accepted during the term in which the student is completing requirements for graduation in this University.

A total of no more than 30 units of coursework in business administration may be applied toward a degree, except in the case of students majoring in business administration.

A total of no more than 28 units may be applied towards a degree from Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), DANTES and/or CLEP tests.

Cross Listed Courses

A cross-listed course is one that carries credit in more than one department or program.

Dean’s Honor Roll

Each undergraduate student currently enrolled in the University who achieves a 3.5 grade point average or above at the close of a term in which twelve or more units of letter-graded (A through F) work have been completed is designated as being on the Dean’s Honor Roll for that term. A notation is indicated on the student’s academic record of this achievement.

Degree Types

Second Bachelor’s Degree (consecutively or concurrent):

Second Bachelor’s degrees are awarded under the following conditions:

  1. The student does complete 32 units beyond those required for the degree that has the highest credit requirement. These units must be completed in residence at Pacific.
  2. The student does complete all specific requirements of both programs (both general educations and majors).
  3. Both degrees must be completed at the same time under the same catalog requirements when earned concurrently.

Multiple Majors:

Students may obtain a baccalaureate degree with multiple majors by completing the requirements for all majors under the same catalog requirements. Majors may consist of departmental majors, interdepartmental majors or majors in different schools. Multiple majors are recorded on the student’s permanent record, but only one degree is awarded. The degree is issued by the student’s primary declared school.

Diplomas

Diplomas are not awarded at Commencement but are available approximately three to four months afterward. Diplomas are mailed to the permanent address on file. Diplomas are not issued if you have outstanding financial obligations to the University. Diplomas left unclaimed are destroyed after five years. Students must re-order and pay for new or replacement diplomas.

The student’s diploma lists the degree, the school/college, and, if applicable, major and academic honors. The official academic transcript also lists the major(s), concentration(s) minor(s) and academic honors. Graduation dates posted on the diploma coincide with the last day of the semester. Degrees are posted Fall, Spring and Summer I, II and III. The official graduation date reflects the completion of all academic requirements for the degree and not necessarily the last term of enrollment.

Enrollment Verification

Students who need enrollment verification from the Office of the Registrar must be registered in the term to be verified. Students should print enrollment verifications by logging onto insidePacific, then selecting the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) Link and print Enrollment verification. Students can also obtain their good student standing certificate here.

Final Examinations

Students are required to take all scheduled exams. Matters of grading and testing procedures are the responsibility of individual instructors. If the instructor chooses to give a final examination, it must be scheduled during the time specified by the University Registrar for the final examination for that course. No student is allowed to take a final examination before the scheduled time.

Grade Point Average

The Pacific grade point average is determined by adding the total quality points and by dividing the resultant sum by the total number of quality hours. As a general rule, the ratio is based on the number of letter graded units completed; e.g., if a student repeats a course both courses will be considered in the overall grade point average.

Grading Policies

Symbols and Definitions:

Undergraduate and first professional level students are assigned grades in keeping with the following provisions. (Grading policies for graduate students are defined in the Graduate Catalog.)

Symbol GPA Definition
A 4.0 Outstanding work, highly meritorious
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0 Very good but not outstanding
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0 Satisfactory
C- 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0 Barely passing but counts toward graduation
F 0.0 Failure. Grade count in the grade point average must be repeated with a satisfactory grade to receive credit toward graduation. Also, an F is a default grade given when an instructor does not report a grade.
AU/AW Audit/Audit Withdrawal
I Incomplete work is work not complete due to extenuating and hardship circumstances which prevent the completion of the work assigned within the regular time of the term. Each incomplete grade assigned must be accompanied with a contract statement agreed to by both instructor and student as to: a.) what work remains to be completed, b.) how it is to be evaluated, and c.) a time indicated for completion within but no later than the following deadlines: for fall semester, by July 1 following; for spring semester, by November 1 following; for summer term, by January 1 following. If work is not completed within these stipulated times, the instructor can indicate a grade in lieu of the F/NC which automatically would be imposed with failure to complete the work. All incompletes must be made up before the last day of the semester in which the student intends to graduate.
N Deferred grading
NC No credit recognition. Represents unsatisfactory work under pass/no credit option. It is not assignable in the Conservatory of Music.
NG No credit recognition. Represents unsatisfactory work under pass/no credit option. It is not assignable in the Conservatory of Music.
P Passing work on the pass/no credit system. P grade is approved only for certain courses and programs of a college or school. Beginning Fall 2016, the University requires a minimum of C- or better to pass a course with a 'Pass/No Credit Grading Option'.
W Authorized withdrawal from courses after the prescribed period.

Graduation Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees

Candidates for undergraduate degrees must adhere to all of the University’s regulations. In particular they must have:

  1. Completed the major requirements specified by the school/college/department with a minimum grade point average of 2.0. At least 16 units of the major requirements must be completed at Pacific;
  2. Completed a minimum of 30 units in general education including Pacific Seminars 1, 2 and 3 and a path of six or nine courses as specified by the school or college (transfer students should refer to the General Education section for GE requirements);
  3. Met Fundamental skills requirements;
  4. Achieved a grade point average of at least 2.0 on all letter-graded work completed at Pacific. On non-letter-graded work, the faculty will determine the equivalency;
  5. Fulfilled the minimum residence requirement of 32 out of the last 40 semester units prior to receiving the degree; and
  6. Accumulated the appropriate number of program units specified by the particular school or college.

Filing for Graduation

Application for Graduation: An  Application for Graduation must be filed with the Office of the Registrar as an indication of intent to graduate at a specific term by the April deadline. For undergraduate students, it should be filed upon completion of 92 units (senior standing) and for professional pharmacy students who expect to fulfill degree requirements during the next academic year. This allows time for a review of studies completed and to enable the students to enroll for any requirements not yet completed.

Degree Check: After a student files their Application for Graduation both the program and Office of the Registrar check for the fulfillment of course and GPA requirements, i.e. university wide, major, department, college/school, general education.

Honors at Graduation

University wide honors at graduation for undergraduates and professional pharmacy are awarded on the following criteria. The student must have completed a minimum of 54 letter-graded units at Pacific and will be based on the student’s final overall institutional (Pacific) grade point average. The requirements are: Cum Laude (honors) 3.5, Magna Cum Laude (high honors) 3.7, and Summa Cum Laude (Highest Honors) 3.9.

Because Commencement occurs prior to spring semester grading, the commencement program indicates honors as of fall semester grades. The student must have completed a minimum of 36 letter graded units at Pacific at this time. Actual honors confirmed, as shown on diplomas and transcripts, is determined once all coursework has been completed and graded.

Major

A major represents the area of study a student has chosen to pursue for a degree. Students who have not chosen a major are designated as ‘exploratory’. A student who decides to change a major or to declare one must submit an approved Change of Program form with the Office of the Registrar. Course and unit requirements for each of the majors offered are in the department’s section of the General Catalog.

Minor

A minor represents a prescribed group of courses in a subject area other than the major. A minor is not required for a degree, but may be elected to strengthen preparation in areas related to the major. To earn a minor a minimum of five courses and 20 units and a minor GPA of 2.00 is required. At least a minimum of 10 units must be taken at Pacific.  Course requirements for each of the minors offered are in the department’s section of the General Catalog. Students who wish to have a minor posted to their academic record must submit an approved Change of Program form with the Office of the Registrar.

Official Grades

Official grades are available to students via insidePacific approximately two weeks after the end of the term. Unofficial grades are available on insidePacific after the end of the faculty grade deadline. The grades posted at that time are merely an indication of grades submitted, and grades still missing. They do not show a GPA, or academic standing.

Pass/No Credit Grading System

Depending upon the regulation of a particular college or school, students may request to receive pass or no credit grades rather than the traditional letter grades. This is available to encourage enrollments in courses outside the student’s area of major or specialization and thus to help broaden the student’s general education.

Normally this freedom is limited to one course per student per term and does not include courses within a student’s major field. Students must submit an approved Add/Drop form to the Office of the Registrar prior to the add/drop deadline.  Beginning Fall 2016, the University requires a minimum grade of C- or better to pass a course with a 'Pass/No Credit Grading Option'.

Prerequisites

Prerequisites for courses are listed in each course description; the responsibility for meeting these requirements rests on the student. The instructor, chair or dean’s office may request that a student who has not completed the prerequisites be dropped from the course.

Regression Rule

Students who complete coursework at an intermediate or advanced level without first completing the lower level introductory courses may not then go back and take the lower level courses for credit. This rule applies primarily to coursework in mathematics, the sciences, and foreign language. It may also apply in other departments in which there is a clear content sequence between courses.

Returning to Pacific

After Cancellation

New Students: If new students cancel their registration and wish to attend Pacific in a future term, they must submit a new application for admission. Previous admission status has no bearing on the decision for admission in the future.

Continuing Students: If continuing students cancel their registration, have been gone from the university for two or more consecutive semesters (excluding summer) and wish to attend Pacific in a future term, they must submit an Application for Return to Active Status (Re-admission), available through the Office of Admission.

After Withdrawal: If students completely withdrew from the University and wish to return in a future semester, they must submit an Application for Return to Active Status(Re-admission).

Registration

Registration is the means by which an individual officially becomes a student at Pacific. Registrants are further identified by school/college of the University, degree status, classification and major.

All students must complete registration activity by the add/drop or withdrawal dates published in the University Academic Calendar and Term Calendars.   Students are held accountable to complete every course for which they are registered.

Additional registration activity past these deadlines must be requested by the student and approved through a petition.  Petitions may include a service fee. Petitions are normally approved only if it can be shown that the request is warranted due to some special situation or hardship. Approved late withdrawals appear on the student’s transcript with the notation “W” but do not count in the units earned or in the GPA.

Registration - Individualized Study

Individualized study courses are designed for special educational needs which are not met by the available curriculum. Students must submit and approved Individualized Study Request form with the Office of the Registrar. Note: Students on academic probation may not register for Individualized Study. Unclassified students must obtain special permission from the school/college dean's office of which the course is housed.

Repetition of a Course

In order to repeat a course at the undergraduate or first professional (PharmD) level, students must have received a C- or lower the first time the class was taken. Once a course is completed (with a grade of C or higher) the student may not repeat any prerequisites for that course. The grading option, when repeating a course, must be the same as the one used originally. Any given course can be repeated one time only. Fundamental Skills courses are exempt from the one time repeat rule.

Students must have both a 2.00 cumulative Pacific GPA and a 2.00 major/minor/program Pacific GPA to graduate. Prior to Fall Semester 2015, the grades received for courses repeated were averaged. Beginning Fall Semester 2015, the best institutional grade attempted when repeating a course is used to calculate the cumulative Pacific GPA and the major/minor/program GPA. Both the initial and subsequent repeat grade will remain on the academic record.

Students may exercise their grade replacement rights up to a maximum of the first three repeated courses, while enrolled in undergraduate degree programs at Pacific.  Any additional course repeats will be 'grade averaged' for the cumulative Pacific GPA and the major/minor/program GPA.  Basic skills are exempt from the three times rule.

A student's Major/Minor/Program GPA is calculated in the following manner:

  • When multiple courses can be used to complete a particular requirement, the course with the best grade will be used in the calculation.
  • Transfer/Test articulated work will not be used in the calculation.

Additionally for Major and Minor GPA calculations:

  • Only courses currently completing the requirements up to the total number of units required for that particular major or minor are used.
  • Successfully completed major and minor courses in excess of what is required to complete it are not used in the calculation.

Transcripts

Upon request by the student to the Office of the Registrar, an official transcript of his or her academic record is issued to whomever he or she designates. A service fee per transcript is charged for processing the record. Students can request a transcript online, in person or by mail.

Official transcripts from other institutions become the property of the University and are not reissued or copied for distribution to other institutions. Copies of transcripts of work completed at other institutions must be obtained from the originating institution.

Transfer Credit Policy

University of the Pacific accepts units from all regionally accredited colleges and universities in the United States. Please read carefully the rules governing transfer credit acceptance at Pacific.

The evaluation and award of university transfer credit for coursework will be based on official college transcripts. To be eligible for evaluation the coursework must appear on an official transcript from the institution that offered the coursework and initially confirmed the credit in question.

The evaluation and award of testing exams will be based on official score reports. To be eligible for evaluation test scores must appear on an official transcript from the testing center that offered the test and initially confirmed the score in question.

Awarding criteria may change from year to year. New students will be granted credit based on the criteria in effect during the catalog year the student enters the university. Current students will be granted credit based on the criteria in effect the term they take the course.

Pacific's ROAR (Roam Online Articulation Reports) has been designed to show how credits from other institutions and approved testing programs will transfer to Pacific. ROAR is available to view on the Office of the Registrar's home page as well as the Office of Admissions' home page. Before current Pacific students register for a course at another institution they should first receive approval via a Transfer Course Approval Request form (TCAR) that can be found under Frequently Used Forms on the Office of the Registrar's website. New students do not need to submit TCAR's; please speak with an Admission Transfer Counselor.

University of The Pacific allows students to transfer coursework from other colleges and universities, counting toward a Pacific degree.

Unit Limits

Units are granted in chronological order of when courses were taken, oldest courses first.

2-Year Institutions

Once 70 units are accumulated from all schools including Pacific and approved testing programs, additional community college courses will satisfy course content requirements only and will not apply to the minimum units required for graduation.

4-Year Institutions

Once a student has reached 40 units fewer than what is required for his/her degree, only 8 more units will be accepted from a four-year institution. The only exception to this rule is for students studying for one or more terms in an approved education abroad program.

Additional community college or four-year institution courses will satisfy content requirements only and will not apply to the total units required for graduation. Satisfaction of content requirements means that the Pacific requirement will be met upon successful completion of the transfer course even though units will not transfer.

Note: Course content is the satisfaction of a Pacific requirement without the transfer of units. Courses transferred with course content only do not need to be repeated since they may fulfill a requirement.

Content of Courses

In interpreting transfer credit, University of the Pacific generally accepts comparable courses which are of the same quality as courses offered on this campus. Generally, courses completed at four-year accredited colleges and universities will transfer.

Quarter System Conversion

Courses completed in a quarter hour system will be converted to semester hours, therefore reducing the total hours accepted by one-third (hours, credits, units). The minimum units required fulfilling a Pacific course and/or GE credit transferred from a quarter school is 2.668. The minimum units required fulfilling a Pacific course and/or GE transferred from a semester school is 3.0.

Transferable Grades

Beginning Fall '06 a grade of "C" or above will transfer to Pacific. No units will be awarded and no degree requirements will be fulfilled for courses that do not meet this minimum. These courses will not satisfy any degree requirements.

Only units are transferable; grades are not transferred nor are they calculated into the Pacific cumulative or major GPA. For admissions purposes only, your transfer GPA will be calculated using all grades. Note: courses are accepted in chronological order, oldest courses first.

The Grade Point Average (GPA) that is calculated for graduation purposes consists of all grades earned at Pacific. Neither external credit nor transfer credit will be used in this calculation or appear on the Pacific transcript.

Audits also fall under this category. University transfer credit is not awarded for coursework that was only audited at the originating institution; these courses are not calculated into the admission or graduation GPA.

You may only receive credit once for a course taken. If a course is transferred and then repeated at Pacific only the units for the transfer course will be awarded. The Pacific course will bear no units or GPA value. If a course is taken at Pacific and then repeated at a transfer institution only the units and grade for the Pacific course will count. A GPA thus cannot be improved by taking courses outside of Pacific.

Acceptable Accreditations

Pacific accepts transfer credit only from regionally accredited colleges and universities. The following are the accrediting bodies recognized:

  • Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC)
  • Northwestern Association of Schools and Colleges
  • Southern Association of Schools and Colleges
  • New England Association of Schools and Colleges
  • Middle States Association of College and School Commission on Higher Education
  • North Central Association of Schools and Colleges (Dissolved as of Fall 2014)
  • Higher Learning Commision (HLC)

We reserve the right to request additional information about coursework including: Course descriptions, syllabi and catalogs.

Requirements for Transfer Students

CORE Seminar Requirements

Transfer students who have completed 28 or more units of transferable, classroom college work after receiving their high school diploma are exempt from CORE 001 and CORE 002.

Individual schools and colleges may impose general education graduation requirements, including skills requirements, beyond the University’s general education program.

Breadth Program Requirements

Transfer students with documented completion of a general education program from an accredited institution of higher education (e.g., the IGETC or CSU Breadth General Education Certification) prior to enrolling at Pacific satisfy Pacific's General Education Breadth program. Students who have not completed a general education program will have their courses articulated for general education credit on a course by course basis.

Transfer students matriculating with a seven-course pattern IGETC will need to complete a maximum of two additional courses (in lieu of CORE 001 and CORE 002) in any Area of Inquiry; and if not covered through an articulated course, one of those additional courses must satisfy the Diversity and Inclusion requirement.

Transfer students who have not completed either the seven-course IGETC or a complete general education program at an accredited institution are required to satisfy all Areas of Inquiry. Transfer students with multiple courses articulated into one Area of Inquiry may substitute one of those courses to satisfy another Area of Inquiry. A maximum of one substitution of this type is allowed and must be approved by the Director of General Education, upon referral from the student’s advisor.

Diversity and Inclusion Requirement

Transfer students are required to meet the Diversity and Inclusion Requirement and may do so using transfer coursework or coursework at Pacific.

Fundamental Skills Requirements

Fundamental skills requirements for transfer students include writing and quantitative analysis (math). Students may demonstrate competence in these skills in one of three ways:

  1. Completion of approved, college-level courses at an accredited college or university;
  2. Satisfactory performance on an approved, nationally administered examination; or
  3. Satisfactory performance on examinations administered through Pacific. Placement tests taken by transfer students at their previous institution do not replace Pacific’s assessments.

Transfer Credit Limitations

Pacific does not recognize non-collegiate level courses that are clearly intended to be a review of secondary material which schools often designate as remedial or developmental. (i.e. Reading, Intro to Writing, Elementary Algebra) However, you may receive credit for College Writing (WRIT 021) and Intermediate Algebra (MATH 005) courses if you were granted credit at the originating institution. 

Included in the category above are selected "orientation" and "skill building" courses (e.g. navigation, speed reading, food preparation, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, guidance, personal development, intro to college, etc.)

Pacific does not recognize or grant credit for courses in areas which differ significantly from those offered at Pacific or courses that are technical or vocational in nature (e.g. office skills, electronics, apprenticeship programs, fashion designing, forestry, dental assisting, medical assisting, etc).

High School College Level Coursework

Students who have completed college level coursework while in high school will be awarded up to 70 units total. They should follow the same admission procedures for students entering directly from high school, plus submit an official community college transcript. These transfer courses will follow the same transfer guidelines outlined in this policy.

Evaluation of Military

Credit recommended in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category will be allowed in appropriate areas providing that the coursework was completed prior to reaching 70 transferable units from other institutions-it will be treated in the same manner as coursework from a community institution.

Credit recommended in the upper division baccalaureate category will be accepted for either course content or course credit depending on unit limit restrictions.

A maximum of two units in courses such as drill and marksmanship taken as part of an ROTC program at an accredited college are accepted as ACTY (activity) courses. Fifteen additional units of ROTC or military science courses will be accepted if taken from an accredited college.

Official documentation of completion of a military course will be required before giving credit for military course work. Documents that can be used are: ACE SMART or AARTS transcripts.

Course Placement

Some schools and programs of study at Pacific may require a placement test regardless of prior coursework. Failure to pass a placement test will result in remediation in that area of study. Pacific will not recognize placement tests from other colleges and universities.

Procedure for International Credit Evaluation

Students who attended schools outside of the United States and wish to attend University of the Pacific must go through a four step process:

  1. Transcript Evaluation      
  2. Translating Transcripts      
  3. Submitting Official Transcripts      
  4. Submitting Translated Course Descriptions

Transcript Evaluation

International students who attended schools outside of the United States must submit an evaluation of academic records, and this evaluation must be based on official transcripts. The University of the Pacific currently accepts evaluations from the following agencies (click on any of the agencies to visit their site):

Please request a course-by-course evaluation including a grade point average (GPA). Official copies of the evaluation should be sent directly to University of the Pacific's Office of Admission. Your transcripts must be translated into English before an evaluation can be processed.  The educational documentation you will need to submit to these agencies may vary based on the country of study, as well as the highest level of education you have completed outside of the United States. We recommend that you visit the website of your preferred agency to obtain information about what types of documentation are required for submission in order to obtain an evaluation report. Credit will not be allowed in transfer from any school, foreign or domestic, for coursework in English taught as a second language or intended to develop fluency.   

If you are applying to a graduate program, the final evaluation transcript must show an awarded degree equivalent to a bachelor's degree or higher.

Translating Official Transcripts

Transcripts that are not in English must be accompanied by an official English translation. Many schools will be able to accommodate your request to have your transcripts issued in English. If your school is unable to issue official transcripts in English:

  1. You may take your transcripts and diploma/proof of degree to the appropriate verifying institution (i.e. Educational Ministry) to have them translated and notarized. The institution can then send those documents directly to the evaluation service in a sealed, preferably signed envelope. If the institution will only release the verification to you, please request that they put it in a sealed envelope so that you can forward that envelope directly to the evaluation provider; DO NOT open the envelope as that will void the verification. The documents must be received in their original sealed envelope to be considered official.
  2. You may submit your transcripts to a translation service. The translation service can then send those documents directly to the evaluation provider in a sealed, preferably signed envelope. If they send the translation to you, it must be forwarded to the evaluation service in its original sealed state. Again, DO NOT open the envelope as that will void the translation; the documents must be sealed to be considered official. You should also request that an official copy (in your native language) accompany the translation so they can compare the original to the translation.

Submitting Official Transcripts

Submit all official transcripts from all the schools you have previously attended (secondary, post-secondary, college, university, etc.) showing the work you have completed to date. If you are currently in any courses that you have not completed you may submit an official transcript containing these courses listed as In Progress. Once you have completed these courses, you must submit another transcript with these courses completed and graded. These documents are acceptable for admissions evaluating purposes. To be considered "official" your transcripts must remain sealed by the issuing university. If your university does not seal their transcripts as a standard procedure, please request that they place your transcripts in a sealed university envelope and stamp the outside flap with their school seal. Forward these documents directly to the application system; please do not open the envelope as this will void the transcripts.

Submitting Translated Course Descriptions

Students who attended universities outside of the United States must also submit course descriptions of their completed university work. The course descriptions must come from either the school's website or official catalog, and if not in English, they must include translations into English. Please send the course descriptions to University of the Pacific's Office of Admission.  

Testing Credit Limitations

Students may earn up to 28 semester units through university recognized testing and advanced credit programs. Several contexts exist for the granting of lower division Pacific credit for coursework completed prior to admission to this university, e.g. Advanced Placement, CLEP subject examinations, International Baccalaureate, and the DANTES programs. In each case the knowledge was gained prior to matriculation at Pacific and was tested through a standardized examination. Testing credits are not considered credits in residence and are subject to maximum transfer credit restrictions. In addition, since they are undergraduate transfer credits, they cannot contribute to the 54 graded credits needed for honors at graduation. These credits will only be granted when total transfer credit is below 70. All other studies in these categories are considered to be at the lower division level and therefore fall within the 70 credit community college limitation.

AP - Advance Placement examination results scored 4 and above are normally acceptable and credit and/or content is granted.

CLEP & DANTES - Credit may be granted as a result of passing scores in the College Level Examination Program subject examinations and DANTES.

IB - International Baccalaureate Higher Level examination results scored 5, 6, or 7 are normally acceptable; credit and/or content is granted.

Credit by Exam - Pacific will honor courses that are listed as Credit by Exam on official transcripts from another institution. The course will be treated as any other transfer course and follow the same evaluation process.

Undergraduate Unclassified Students

Undergraduate Unclassified students, who do not hold a Bachelor's degree, may complete up to 27.9 units prior to being required to formally apply for admission to the university. Upon admittance to the university, resident and transfer coursework will be evaluated.

University of the Pacific’s Four-Year Guarantee

The purpose of the Four-Year Graduation Guarantee (“Guarantee”) is to facilitate a student's goal to graduate in four years with a Bachelors degree. To be eligible for the Guarantee, a student must satisfy each of the following conditions:

  1. Declare and be admitted to a major by the beginning of the sophomore year by filing a Change of Program form. You may change majors if, at the time you make a change, you can still meet the requirements of the new major and graduate within four calendar years.
  2. Remain in good academic standing (2.00 GPA - major and institutional) at the University.
  3. Complete 32 semester hours of units each year for four years as required by the college and major, and meet all degree progress checkpoints.
  4. Meet with your faculty advisor prior to registration each term to review your course plan and monitor progress.
  5. Register for courses within two days of the assigned early registration appointment. Enroll in available courses needed for the program of study; accept any available section that can be accommodated in your course schedule. Sole exceptions: Students who are on Study Abroad or off campus participating in a full-time co-op may require a few additional days to register.
  6. Make timely annual application for all necessary financial assistance, to avoid registration problems.
  7. Apply for graduation by the stated deadline published in the academic and/or term calendars.
  8. Monitor your own progress toward degree using the electronic degree check audit system (DegreeWorks) and ROAR (Roam On Line Articulation Reports) regarding transfer work to help you stay on track.
  9. Notify faculty advisor if unable to register for a required course needed in the major or for graduation.

•Special exclusions: Five year programs and students following individualized learning programs.

If the student satisfies all of the foregoing conditions, but is unable to graduate due to unavailability of a course, the University will offer one of the following remedies:

  1. Enable the student to graduate in four years by substituting a different course or an independent study assignment, as determined by the department and the college offering the student's major.
  2. Allow the unavailability of the course to delay the student from graduating in four years, in which case the University will waive Pacific tuition and mandatory fees in order for the student to graduate within the next academic year.

The University may choose, in its sole discretion, which of the two foregoing remedies it will offer the student under this Guarantee, and the remedy chosen by the University will be the student’s sole remedy under this Guarantee. The University is under no obligation to provide one of the foregoing remedies unless the student submits a written request for an accommodation to the Provost prior to beginning of classes in the last term of the student's four year plan.

U.S. Military Mobilization

All students who are called to active duty must start the process by providing a copy of the military summons to the Office of the Registrar’s Veterans Affairs (VA) Coordinator, Knoles Hall, first floor, 209-946-2135. Cancellations processed during the first twelve weeks receive a 100% refund and all course sections are dropped before the student leaves for active duty. It is essential that a copy of the military summons be delivered to the Office of the Registrar before departure from campus. This ensures that classes are dropped and that grades of ‘F’ are not issued.

Students called to active duty toward the end of the semester, who are short submitting final papers or cannot take final examinations, are entitled to receive Incompletes (I) for the semester. Arrangements to receive Incompletes must be made with each instructor and copies of the military summons must be left with the Office of the Registrar. Students receiving Incompletes under these conditions are given four semesters to complete the work and remove the marks of ‘I’. If the work is not completed during this special four semester period, the marks of I are automatically converted to marks of W. If the military service period extends beyond the special four semester period, students can file an Academic Regulations Committee (ARC) petition for extension of this special incomplete time period.

Students who leave the University for U.S. military service and follow the procedures outlined above are eligible to re-enroll as returning students. Returning students must file a ‘Return to Active Status’ application with the Office of Admission. Returning students who have questions about Veterans Affairs benefits should contact the VA Coordinator in the Office of the Registrar at 209-946-2135.

Variable Unit Courses

Some course numbers are used to describe specific types of courses, as follows:

  • 087/187/287 – Internship study. Work experience conducted off campus, under the supervision of a non-full time Pacific faculty member.
  • 089/189/289 – Practicum. Work experience conducted on campus, under the direction of a faculty member.
  • 092/192/292 – Cooperative education. Work experience on a full-time or part-time basis. The Cooperative Education Program in each school or college differs in unit allowance. See the appropriate school for unit specifics in the general catalog.
  • 093/193/293/393 – Special Topics. Departments may offer, on occasion, special topic courses. Courses may reflect the current research of the instructor or the needs and interests of a group of students. Detailed descriptions can be obtained from the chair in which the courses are being offered.
  • 191/291/391 – Independent Study
  • 195/295/395 – Seminar. Undergraduate/Graduate/doctoral
  • 197/297/397 – Independent Research.

Graduate/Doctoral

  • 299 – Master’s Thesis
  • 399 – Doctoral Dissertation

Note: These numbering standards are general standards and reflect current practice among most units. Some units may have exceptions to these. Students should check for these within their majors for individual unit standards that may differ from these general numbering standards.

Withdrawal From a Semester or the University

Students who intend to completely withdraw from a semester or from the university have to initiate the process in the Office of the Registrar. The withdrawal date used by Financial Aid for the Return of Title IV Aid calculation and the effective date used by Student Accounts for tuition refunds are based on the date of your notification to the Office of the Registrar. If a student intends to withdraw from a semester after the last day to withdraw, it must be approved by the Academic Regulations Committee. Courses the student was registered for after the last day to drop appear on that student’s transcript with the notation “W” but do not count in the units earned or in the calculation of the grade point average. If a student only withdraws from a semester, he/she has one more semester to keep his/her continuing active status. If the students has completely withdrawn from the University, he/she must file a Return to Active Status application with the Office of Admission.

An official withdrawal from the University is the termination of rights and privileges offered to currently enrolled students which includes, but not limited to, early registration.