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Diagnostic Sciences (DS)

Course Descriptions

Predoctoral Courses

DS 101. Integrated Clinical Sciences I: Orientation to the Clinical Practice of General Dentistry. 5 Units.

This course is the didactic component of a multi-disciplinary, year-long course designed to prepare students to treat patients in Pacific's Main Dental Clinic and engage in community oral health events and programs. Together, DS 101 and DS 106 focus on Diagnostic Sciences, Behavior Sciences, Periodontology, Prevention and Community Health Care Services and Systems. Case-based simulations are supported by clinical exercises and practical exams. (Quarters 1-3.).

DS 102. Integrated Clinical Sciences I Concepts: Orientation to the Clinical Practice of General Dentistry. 9 Units.

This is a didactic course designed to prepare students to treat patients in Pacific's Main Dental Clinic and engage in community oral health events and programs. The course focuses on Diagnostic Sciences, Behavior Sciences, Periodontology, Prevention and Community Health Care Services and Systems. Case-based simulations are supported by clinical exercises and practical exams. (IDS Quarters 1-2).

DS 106. Integrated Clinical Sciences I: Orientation to the Clinical Practice of General Dentistry Practicum. 7 Units.

The Orientation to the Clinical Practice of General Dentistry Practicum is a clinically-focused, multi-disciplinary, four-quarter course designed to prepare students to treat patients in Pacific's Main Dental Clinic and in community-based settings. This lab/clinic course is comprised of supervised case-based simulations, workshops, clinical exercises and community sites. The focus is on the development of a comprehensive medical and dental database risk assessment; disease prevention strategies; diagnostic tests; oral pathology; electronic chart management; ergonomics; infection control; basic periodontal instrumentation; professional deportment; cultural sensitivity and communication with patients in the clinic and in community settings. (Quarters 1-4).

DS 107. Intergrated Clinical Sciences I Lab: Orientation to Clinical Practice in General Dentistry. 4 Units.

The Orientation to the Clinical Practice of General Dentistry Practicum is a clinically-focused, multi-disciplinary, one-quarter course designed to prepare students to treat patients in Pacific's Main Dental Clinic and in community-based settings. This lab/clinic course is comprised of supervised case-based simulations, workshops, clinical exercises and community sites. The focus is on the development of a comprehensive medical and dental database risk assessment; disease prevention strategies; diagnostic tests; oral pathology; electronic chart management; ergonomics; infection control; basic periodontal instrumentation; professional deportment; cultural sensitivity and communication with patients in the clinic and in community settings. (IDS Quarter 1).

DS 160. Dental Radiology. 1 or 2 Unit.

The application of radiation physics and biology, the assessment of image quality, the practice of radiation safety and prescribing protocols, and the study of radiographic techniques, anatomic landmarks, and the principles of radiographic interpretations for both two- and three-dimensional imaging. (Quarters 2-3).

DS 166. Dental Radiographic Technique. 1-2 Units.

Instruction and practice using the extension cone paralleling radiographic technique including patient management, radiation safety, use of equipment, film placement, exposure, identification and mounting, and correction of technical error. (20 hours lab/clinic. Quarter 4.).

DS 200. Practice Management I. 1 Unit.

Introduces students to the study of fundamental concepts and terminology of the art and science of practice management as a basis for leadership and decisions in dental practice. Students will learn to track and evaluate key practice indicators, read financial reports, understand the importance of leading a team for efficient delivery of patient care, track and control overhead expenses, and set goals. (10 hours. Quarter 5.).

DS 201. Integrated Clinical Sciences II: Application of Foundational Knowledge. 5 Units.

This second year Integrated Clinical Sciences course, “Applications of Foundational Knowledge”, provides students with enriched multidisciplinary diagnostic and technical content that builds on the fundamentals and active learning approach of first year studies. This course is directed from the Department of Diagnostic Sciences however, development and teaching are done in collaboration with many departments and disciplines. Topics include biomedical sciences, information literacy, evidence based dentistry, dental materials, professionalism, community oral health, clinical techniques and issues, and information specific to endodontics, oral surgery, sleep medicine and orofacial pain. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and application of evidence to the clinical diagnosis, treatment and management of patients with diverse needs, in order to improve the novice practitioner’s ability to adjust ideal principles and protocols to the successful management of non-ideal, real world cases. (Quarters 5-6.).

DS 202. Integrated Clinical Sciences II: Application of Foundational Knowledge. 4 Units.

This course builds on foundational clinical and biomedical material presented in first-year studies and in DS 201 through a multidisciplinary approach to basic science principles and clinical application. Topics will be presented in a lecture format as well as smaller seminar sessions, many of which are focused on case scenarios. There is also independent study time to prepare for these activities. Emphasis is placed on the integration of dental concepts, evidence, and critical thinking to deliver accurate diagnoses, prepare customized treatment plans and consider the need for inter-professional collaboration in the delivery of oral health care. Topics include advanced endodontic content, orofacial pain, ethics, patient management, community oral health and various clinical topics. (Quarter 7.).

DS 203. Integrated Clinical Sciences II: Application of Foundational Knowledge. 4-5 Units.

This course continues the multidisciplinary and active learning approach used in DS 201 and DS 202. Topics include advanced content in oral surgery and sedation, endodontics, regenerative dentistry, orofacial pain, ethics, and the management of complex cases. Students are also introduced to resume and professional electronic portfolio development as they ready themselves for professional careers. (Quarter 8).

DS 217. Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. 3-4 Units.

The diagnosis and communication to the patient of the need for dental treatment; recognizing medical, oral, physical, emotional, and economic factors that modify or complicate dental treatment; and development of comprehensive dental treatment plans suitable for patients' needs in accordance with identified modifying and complicating factors. (Quarters 5-8).

DS 266. Clinical Dental Radiology. 2 Units.

Study of preparation, evaluation, and interpretation of diagnostically acceptable intraoral radiographic and panographic surveys for comprehensive care and emergency clinic patients. (Quarters 5-8.).

DS 300. Practice Management II. 3 Units.

Challenges students to apply knowledge of practice management concepts through utilization of a computerized business simulation. Includes preparation for career decisions in dentistry with a focus on practice transitions, associateships, dental benefit plan participation, marketing, debt management, retirement planning, patient billing and collections, scheduling for efficiency, basic accounting, tax planning, and development of business plans. (30 hours lecture. Quarter 11.).

DS 301. Jurisprudence. 1 Unit.

Prepares students for an understanding of the foundations of the law, its primary groupings and modes, and its application to the dentist and dental practice environment. Particular attention will be given to California dental law and risk management. (10 hours lecture. Quarter 12.).

DS 302. Clinical Care of Complex Needs. 4 Units.

Study of basic disease processes, epidemiology, demographics, treatment planning, principles of providing dental treatment for individuals with a wide variety of conditions including medical and developmental disabilities, problems associated with aging, psychological problems including dental phobia, hospital organization, joining a hospital staff, providing dental treatment and consultation in a hospital, and principles of general anesthesia. (20 hours lecture, 20 hours self-study and seminar. Quarters 9-11.).

DS 303. Integrated Clinical Sciences III: Multidisciplinary Case Based Seminars. 6 Units.

Multidisciplinary case based presentations of integrated material related to the practice of clinical dentistry. This three-quarter course builds on the foundational and clinical knowledge base of each student to evaluate and plan more complex treatment needs. (60 hours lecture/seminar. (Quarters 9-11).

DS 307. Extramural Patient Care. 4 Units.

Through a combination of didactic and clinical experiences, this course seeks to prepare the student for practice in community clinical settings where diverse patient populations may be encountered. Upon completion of the course, students will have developed the skills to: perform dental procedures in community-based practice settings, work with diverse patient populations, describe the social context of disease processes, develop social awareness and skills for treating underserved groups, describe dental delivery in a community clinic environment, and develop treatment alternative in clinics with limited resources (90 hours clinical rotations and 4 hours lecture/seminar. Quarters 9-12).

DS 320. Prep for State Licensure. 0 Units.

This course, available to students on an as-needed basis, includes a review of requirements and protocol as well as practical exercises in preparation for the Western Regional Examining Board and other licensing examinations.

DS 399. Enriched Clinical Experience. 16 Units.

This course provides students with an additional opportunity to enhance or enrich their skills in some or all clinical disciplines subsequent to the scheduled graduation date. These experiences are directed by the student’s Group Practice Leader, who also recommends certification for graduation.

PA 230. General Pathology. 6 Units.

Basic concepts of disease are studied, especially with regard to mechanisms, gross tissue changes, microscopic changes in selected instances, and implications and applications of these concepts to dental practice. (52 hours lecture/seminar and 34 hours independent study. Quarters 5-6.).

PA 231. Oral Pathology. 3 Units.

Study of the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical and histopathogenic features, and the treatment and prognosis of oral diseases. Recognition of basic tissue reaction and lesions that occur in the mouth, jaws, and neck; formulation of tentative diagnoses; methods used to secure definitive diagnoses and provide appropriate therapy and management or obtaining consultation for the same. (24 hours lecture, programmed instruction equivalent to 30 hours lecture, and six hours clinical rotation. Quarter 7.).

PA 232. Differential Diagnosis of Oral and Maxillofacial Lesions. 3 Units.

Clinical evaluation, development of a differential diagnosis, and management protocols for oral and paraoral soft tissue and jaw lesions, based on knowledge of the appearance, behavior, and treatment of oral diseases. (Quarter 8.).

Graduate Courses

DS 402. Statistical Methods I. 1 Unit.

Residents learn the importance of data organization and evaluation, and statistical methods used in research. They apply this knowledge to their own research and enhance skills in the interpretation of quality research data. (Quarter 3.).

DS 430. Advanced Oral Pathology I. 1 Unit.

Organized into lectures and clinical-pathologic conferences, this course provides residents a firm foundation in endodontic pathology and clinical entities that may occur in patients but are unrelated to root canal treatment. (Quarter 1.).

DS 460. Advanced Radiology I. 1 Unit.

This course covers key elements of endodontics such as proper radiographic technique and three-dimensional data acquisition and interpretation. Residents obtain and read images from small FOV cone beam scans. (Quarter 1.).

DS 530. Advanced Oral Pathology II. 1 Unit.

Organized into lectures and clinical-pathologic conferences, this course provides residents a firm foundation in endodontic pathology and clinical entities that may occur in patients but are unrelated to root canal treatment. (Quarter 5.).