Bachelor of Arts in General Studies

Degree Offered

Bachelor of Arts in General Studies / Master of Arts in Education with a concentration in Teaching
(blended program)

Major Offered

  • Education

The Bachelor of Arts in General Studies is a degree completion program designed for working professionals in the education industry who want to advance into the teaching profession. Students will complete their bachelor’s degree while acquiring skills to effectively plan, develop and support the delivery of curriculum to students in k-12th grade. The program has a direct pathway to a Masters of Arts in Education with a concentration in Teaching (plus a Multiple Subject or Special Education Credential). A total of 13 units will be used from the BA degree towards the MA degree.

The degree is offered in an accelerated, year-round, format. Courses are on an 8-week term, with students completing two courses each term on a set schedule with the same cohort of classmates. Entering students will ideally have at least 60 units of college coursework before entering the program, so that the additional 60 units of degree requirements will provide them with the 120 units total required for graduation. Students with fewer units may be admitted with the understanding that they will need to take additional courses beyond those required by the Education degree program to complete their graduation requirements.

This program is not open to current Pacific students and requires an interview of each applicant. There is a special reduced tuition for this program.

Degree Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts General Studies degree requires 120 units of credit including fulfilling University fundamental skills proficiency requirement, and completion of the University General Education Program and diversity requirements. Students must earn a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 in all college work taken for the degree at Pacific as well as in the courses taken as requirements in the major.

The Blended Bachelors and Master’s program provides an excellent opportunity for students to begin their graduate work while completing their undergraduate degree requirements. Students can pursue the program which allows them to complete their bachelors and master’s degree in as little as two in a half years. This two in a half year period includes summer sessions.

Students begin by enrolling in the General Studies degree completion program in the Pacific Benerd College. Following acceptance into the program, students who have a minimum of a 3.0 will be automatically enrolled into the graduate program and begin taking graduate level courses during their senior year. Students who have below a 3.0 will follow the existing process of completing a graduate GPA waiver appeal.

Bachelor of Arts in General Studies

Students must complete a minimum of 120 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 or higher in order to earn BA degree in General Studies. The courses required for the degree and Pacific Seminar (required of all students) total 60 units of credit, the remaining 60 can come from transfer credit or other Pacific coursework.

II. Major Requirements 

Students must complete all of the following:

BCPS 120Argumentation and Persuasion3
BCPS 130Professional Communication3
BCPS 150Advanced Professional Writing3
ORGL 143Mediation and Conflict Management3
ORGL 155Professional Ethics3
SOCI 041Social Problems4
EDUC 140Transformational Teaching and Learning4
EDUC 141Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum2
CHEM 015Chemistry in Society3
PSYC 029Developmental Psychology4
MATH 161Elementary Concepts of Mathematics I3
POLS 041U.S. Government and Politics4
EDUC 130Technology Enhanced Learning Environments2
EDUC 145Elementary Physical Education3
EDUC 142Visual Arts in Education3
SPED 225XTeaching Exceptional Learners2
EDUC 261Literacy Development4
SPED 295EPositive Behavioral Support in the Classroom3
EDUC 259Teaching English Learners3

Education Courses

EDUC 010. Dean's Seminar. 1 Unit.

A basic introduction to the career of teaching and the programs and methodologies of the Benerd College including educational requirements, professional orientation, career opportunities and school and university regulations.

EDUC 011. Children's Literature. 3 Units.

Students examine various genres of quality literature for children from preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is on how books affect the growing child and on ways to develop children’s appreciation and comprehension of stories as well as to extend their subject matter knowledge.

EDUC 096A. Service-Learning and Civic Action Part A. 2 Units.

This seminar fulfills the first course of the two-course sequence that constitutes the foundational academic component of the California Civic Action Fellowship. This service-learning fellowship introduces students to some of the most pressing challenges facing urban centers such as Stockton, CA, and, through an interdisciplinary service-learning and social justice lens, offers pathways for addressing these challenges. Bridging theory and practice, the seminar aims to address issues around urban challenges broadly defined, develop civic skills and knowledge, prepare students for 21st-century challenges, and contribute to the public good. Students must take both EDUC 096A and EDUC 096B to earn GE credit for this sequence. (GEDI, GEGR)

EDUC 096B. Service-Learning and Civic Action Part B. 2 Units.

This seminar fulfills the second course of the two-course sequence that constitutes the foundational academic component of the California Civic Action Fellowship. This service-learning fellowship introduces students to some of the most pressing challenges facing urban centers such as Stockton, CA and, through an interdisciplinary service-learning and social justice lens, offers pathways for addressing these challenges. Working from the final proposal delivered at the conclusion of the previous fall semester, students will deliver a project to benefit the community partner with which they serve. Students must take both EDUC 096A and EDUC 096B to earn GE credit for this sequence. (GEDI, GEGR)

EDUC 100. Introduction to Language. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the central role of language in cultures and societies. Emphasis is on social and regional language variation, language and prejudice, gender and social class differences in conversation styles, the history and evolution of languages, and societal attitudes toward language and socio-political-economic influences on language use. Students gain more precision in their academic language development as they explore English grammatical structures and develop an appreciation of the work sociolinguists do through conversational analysis. As part of the University of the Pacific's general education program (1-A), this is a library intensive course. This means that students do library research, using online and other sources to meet some of the course requirements.

EDUC 121X. Learner-Centered Concerns. 3 Units.

This course is a general overview of stages in human development from birth to young adulthood. Topics include prominent learning and motivation theories, learner-centered principles of teaching and assessment, the characteristics of learners with exceptional needs, and individual differences among learners including English language learners. Students who are interested in Multiple Subject, Single Subject and/or Educational Specialist credentials take this course.Twenty hours of fieldwork in K-12 public schools is required. Open to all students.

EDUC 129. Seminar: Cultural Basis of Conflict in Education. 3 Units.

Analysis of cultural diversity in American classrooms. Not open to doctoral students. (ETHC)

EDUC 130. Technology Enhanced Learning Environments. 2 Units.

This course focuses on basic skills and software for creating multimedia projects, completing assignments in all education courses, and meeting the state’s technology standards for teachers. All assignments in this course relate to building the structure and first section of a candidate’s teacher education digital portfolio. Thereafter, candidates add sections to the portfolio during other courses and activities in their programs of study, which includes evidence that they have met the state’s technology standards. Upon graduation, the portfolios are archived. This course is a prerequisite to Admission to Teacher Education.

EDUC 131. First and Second Language Acquisition/Linguistic Foundations. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to first and second language development, using a compare and contrast framework. It covers theoretical perspectives in first and second language acquisition and explores the relationship between theories and practice in language learning and teaching. This course addresses pedagogical implications of various theories of second language acquisition and discusses socio-cultural factors that influence second language learning. In addition, there is particular attention given to language structure (phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax) as it relates to the language development of native speakers of English as well as English language learners. This course includes a fieldwork component for which students work with young elementary students off campus once a week during the semester.

EDUC 140. Transformational Teaching and Learning. 4 Units.

This is an introductory course that explores the complex relationships within and among local, state, and national levels of public instruction. The course introduces historical, legal, and social issues that affect diverse educational settings. Topics include key movements and legal cases of prominence in American education; demographic information about learners and schools in California; home, family and school partnerships; and professional stages in teaching careers (e.g., subject matter preparation, teacher education, initial licensure, induction programs, and professional development). The course also includes an introduction to “reflective practice”; an overview of stages in human development; prominent learning and motivation theories; the characteristics of learners with exceptional needs; and individual differences among learners, which include English language learners. This course is taken by students interested in Multiple Subject, Single Subject and/or Educational Specialist credentials.

EDUC 141. Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum. 2 Units.

This supervised practicum is taken concurrently with EDUC 140: Transformational Teaching and Learning. Students examine the community, school, and classroom contexts and how they influence the teaching and learning process. Translation of current learning theories into practice are analyzed and applied. Students interact with K – 12 students and teachers in public school settings.

EDUC 142. Visual Arts in Education. 3 Units.

This course assists students in developing an understanding of the visual arts and how they interface with children’s development through age 18. The course acquaints students with Visual Arts curriculum in the K-12 classroom. A philosophical emphasis is be placed upon the interface of visual arts with children’s development. The course explores such concepts and processes as aesthetic perception, creative expression, visual arts heritage and aesthetic valuing, and media and materials, suitable for children through age 18. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (GE2C, GEAP)

EDUC 145. Elementary Physical Education. 3 Units.

This course is designed to prepare students for employment in an elementary school setting and provide them with the tools necessary to formulate and implement a comprehensive elementary PE experience for all students. Participants learn a wide range of teaching skills that facilitate the ability to create a quality active learning environment in elementary PE. Students explore effective teaching and assessment strategies, classroom management skills, the use of constructive feedback, the negotiation of diverse classrooms and the development of appropriate student learning outcomes. Students also are introduced to the subject matter of elementary PE and will undertake several teaching episodes. This course encourages students to engage in reflexive teaching practices, develop physically educated young people, maximize student involvement and enjoyment in PE and integrate core curriculum subject matter into PE lessons.

EDUC 150. Teaching and Assessment. 4 Units.

This course supports reflective teaching and learner-centered principles and practices in the K-12 schools. The course focuses on state-adopted curriculum standards and frameworks in seven content fields, particularly on the content area of History/Social Science; approaches to classroom management; selection of curriculum materials at the state level; and evaluation. Topics include implementing appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of students with special needs and culturally diverse learners; and using developmentally appropriate diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments to plan instruction. Technology is used to enhance curriculum design and student interaction with content knowledge. This course is taken concurrently with EDUC 153, Teaching STEM, for Multiple Subject candidates. EDUC 150 is taken by Education Specialist candidates.

EDUC 153. Teaching Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. 4 Units.

Methods and curriculum presented for teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics in self-contained classrooms. Topics include state-apopted content standards and curriculum framework; essential mathematics, technology, engineering, life, physical, and earth science themes, concepts, and skills; instructional planning and diverse and appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; principles and practices of evaluation of students' learning. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 140.

EDUC 154. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Secondary Classrooms. 2 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Prerquisites: Instructor approval or Teacher Education Program permission; minimum 2.5 GPA, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 155. Teaching in the Content Areas I. 3 Units.

This is the first of a three-part course for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. Candidates learn and apply current learning theories to planning, instruction, and assessment, focusing on the general knowledge, skills, and dispositions associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. Candidates begin to learn about specific subject matter content and pedagogy and a variety of instructional and assessment strategies to benefit all learners. The needs of all secondary school students, including English Learners, and characteristics of the school environment are emphasized for fostering effective teaching and learning.

EDUC 156. Content and Disciplinary Literacy Development in Secondary Schools. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to research-based content literacy instruction. The course focuses on preparing candidates to teach content-based reading and writing skills to a full range of students which includes struggling readers, students with special needs, and English Learners. A variety of content-based literacy strategies (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) is presented to facilitate learning in the content areas. The course meets credential requirements.

EDUC 157. TESOL Theory and Practice. 4 Units.

This course provides a link between theory and practice in the teaching of ESL. Aspects of language learning is discussed, and concomitant instruction and curriculum is analyzed while developing a working model for the development of curriculum that is appropriate for the teaching situation.

EDUC 160. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Secondary Classrooms. 2 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Prerequisites: Instructor approval or Teacher Education Program permission; minimum 2.5 GPA, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 161. Literacy Development (Multiple Subject). 4 Units.

This course introduces methods and curriculum for teaching reading and language arts with integration of humanities and social science for students from kindergarten to eighth grade classrooms. The course focuses on theory-based effective instruction of reading, writing, listening and speaking across the curriculum. Students learn to analyze and evaluate effective literacy skills and strategies in teaching reading, writing, listening and speaking to K-8 students, and to apply and practice these skills and strategies in various instructional settings in various content areas. Emphasis is placed on the integration of reading and language arts throughout the curriculum. Twenty-four hours of fieldwork is required. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching (Professional Practice).

EDUC 162. Literacy Assessment (Multiple Subject). 2 Units.

This course investigates the uses of ongoing instructional diagnostic strategies in reading and language arts that guide teaching and assessment. Topics include early intervention techniques appropriate for a classroom setting and guided practice of these techniques. Fieldwork is required and shared with EDUC 161. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching and may be taken with EDUC 161 concurrently. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education with fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 163. Teaching English Learners. 4 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English profeciency in K-8 classrooms. Teachers will develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to both the California english Language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these strategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objectives include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series fieldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. (ETHC)

EDUC 164. Introduction to Bilingual Education. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of bilingual education and is designed to meet the needs of both undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in understanding the role of bilingual, bicultural education in schools. Students explore the related implications of second language acquisition research, sociopolitical theory, and historical as well as contemporary experiences in the contexts of program design, instructional practice, and school/community relations toward a conceptualization of bilingual education as a source of pedagogical enrichment strategies for all learners in all settings. Prerequisites: EDUC 100 and EDUC 131. (ETHC)

EDUC 165. Teaching in the Content Areas II. 2 Units.

This is the second of a multi-course series for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. The emphasis in this course is on content-specific practices. Candidates join their respective professional organizations and participate in those organizations’ professional development experiences. In addition to whole class meetings, candidates meet in content-specific seminars with practitioners in their content areas on a regular basis.

EDUC 166. Teaching English Learners, Single Subject. 3 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English proficiency in K-12 classrooms. Teahcers develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to the California English language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these stategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objective include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series feldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 140 or instructor/Teacher Education Program permission; minimium 2.5 GPA; Fingerprint and TB test clearance. (ETHC)

EDUC 167. Adolescent Development. 3 Units.

This course is designed for secondary preservice teachers to consider the principles of adolescent development in context. Biological, cognitive, psychological, social, and moral development are examined to determine how these developmental pathways affect student achievement, motivation, and well being. The influence of family, peers, school, and the broader community on development are explored as well. Implications of current understandings of adolescent development on teaching, learning, and assessment are emphasized. In addition to class meetings, students participate in a practicum in order to apply learning in school settings.

EDUC 168. Microcomputers in Education. 3 Units.

This course introduces the student to the major concepts and applications related to the use of microcomputers in education. Students learn basic operations, terminology and capabilities of microcomputers within an educational context. Key issues related to the use of instructional technology are discussed. Application and evaluation of software for classroom instruction and management is investigated.

EDUC 169. Microcomputers and Curriculum Design. 3 Units.

Issues related to the educational application of instructional technology and its impact on education is investigated. Students do in-depth analyses of software applications and their validity in relation to learning models and the current curriculum. Students evaluate how new technologies may effect change in curriculum. Various projects that relate to evaluation of software, teaching strategies and research in new technologies are required. Prerequisite: EDUC 168 or permission of instructor.

EDUC 170. Professional Practice. 2-10 Units.

Professional practice is a full-day of Student Teaching in public schools. Candidates for a Single Subject and Multiple Subject Preliminary teaching credential are placed in local public schools for intensive application of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for professional practice in California schools. Student Teaching is full-day teaching for a semester, and undergraduates are approved for Student Teaching. Prerequisites: EDUC 130, EDUC 140, EDUC 141, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDUC 152, EDUC 161, EDUC 162, EDUC 163, EDUC172 (concurrently); SPED 125X (concurrently) with grades of “C” or higher; a minimum GPA of 2.5.; admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; a passing score on the CBEST with subject matter completed (CSET examination or approved subject matter/waiver program) and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance with TB test clearance and program assessments completed prior to Directed Teaching; Directed Teaching approval process must be completed with clearance by the Director of Field Experiences; The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework is permitted other than SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops. A candidate must petition for permission to take an additional course in advance with the Teacher Education Program's Director of Field Experiences.

EDUC 171. Professional Practice Music. 2-10 Units.

This course is a full-day of Student Teaching in public schools. Candidates for a Single Subject Music Preliminary teaching credential are placed in local public schools for intensive application of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for professional practice in California schools. Student Teaching is full-day teaching for a semester, and undergraduates may be approved for Student Teaching. Prerequisites are EDUC 130, EDUC 140, EDUC 141, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDUC 152, EDUC 161, EDUC 162, EDUC 163, EDUC 171 (concurrently); SPED 125X (concurrently) with grades of “C” or higher; a minimum GPA of 2.5; admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; a passing score on the CBEST with subject matter completed (CSET examination or approved subject matter/waiver program) and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance with TB test clearance program assessments completed prior to Directed Teaching; completed Directed Teaching approval process with clearance by the Director of Field Experiences; The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework is permitted other than EDUC 172 and SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops. A candidate must petition for permission to take an additional course in advance with the Teacher Education Program's Director of Field Experiences.

EDUC 172. Professional Practice Seminar. 2-10 Units.

Students reflect upon and integrate the Directed Teaching experience in large and small group settings for the SB 2042 Credential. Topics include multicultural education, child abuse, school law, interpreting standardized test scores, professional associations and negotiations, discipline plans, lesson planning and conferencing skills. This course may be taken concurrently with EDUC 170/EDUC 270.

EDUC 175. Teaching in the Content Areas III. 2 Units.

This course is the culminating part of a three-part course for Single Subject credential candidates that develops professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms schools. It is taken concurrently with the professional practice practicum (student teaching). Emphasis in the first two parts of the course is placed on acquiring and practicing general and content-specific knowledge, skills, and ethical values associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. The course is co-taught by University faculty and K-12 Content Area Specialists. In the third and final portion of the course, candidates integrate and synthesize prior learning and independently teach grades 7 – 12 students in their professional practice placements. University and Grades 7 – 12 Content Area Specialists supervise and support candidates and continue to lead seminar sessions. The capstone assessment that leads to the Level I teaching credential, the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) Teaching Event (TE) is completed as part of this course.

EDUC 180. Workshop Learning: Issues Group Leadership. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to support the learning and leadership model, Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL). The course topics include practical information (understanding motivation, managing time, dealing with dominating students, learning styles, group dynamics, study skills, helping students improve critical thinking, develop logical reasoning, and prepare for tests), a foundation in learning theory, and guidance about the specific components of the workshop lessons.

EDUC 181. ECE: Social Justice/Diversity. 3 Units.

This course is conducted as an undergraduate level seminar that is designed to examine key normative issues in the area of social justice, diversity and multiculturalism with an emphasis in early childhood education. The relation of social diversity (race, ethnicity, gender, language, societal attitudes and class) to equality in education and education reform movements is viewed from multiple contexts. Topics explored are diversity, sociopolitical aspects of history and the impact on education, and specifically, early childhood education and multiculturalism. A practicum is required in this course. (DVSY, ETHC)

EDUC 182. ECE: Curriculum and Inquiry. 3 Units.

This course is an upper division course that examines the theoretical understandings of curriculum and inquiry in the early childhood development classroom. Students refine their knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to early childhood methodology and application to young children in diverse populations.

EDUC 183. ECE: Social Contexts/Cognitive Development. 3 Units.

This course is conducted as an undergraduate level seminar that is designed to clarify the cognitive, philosophical, historical, psychological, cultural, social and ethical foundations of early childhood education. The nature of theory and practice are important to teachers of young children and this course provides a broad synthesis of knowledge of child development principles to better understand how children think, act, and how to be effective with them in the classroom.

EDUC 188. Literacy in Early Childhood Education. 3 Units.

This course will intellectually engage participants in the exploration of integrating theory, research and practice in the dimensions of literacy for young children zero to five years of age. Participants will be expected to advance their own knowledge base as they develop their ability to research, analyze, evaluate and synthesize developmental, sociocultural, linguistic, cognitive and other sign systems associated with literacy events. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

EDUC 189. Practicum. 2-4 Units.

EDUC 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 192. Preliminary Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of program lead.

EDUC 192A. Elementary Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of program lead.

EDUC 192B. Secondary Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of program lead.

EDUC 192D. Early Childhood Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of program lead.

EDUC 192E. Reading Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of program lead.

EDUC 192F. Bilingual Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of program lead.

EDUC 192G. Cross-cultural Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of program lead.

EDUC 195A. Pedagogical Seminar. 3 Units.

Investigation of the role that subject matter knowledge and its representations play in teaching. Emphasis on self-assessment of subject matter knowledge. Focus on moral and ethical dimensions of teaching and learning. Prequisite: completion of a minimum of 8 units in a concentration for the diversified major or multiple subjects wavier program. Senior status or second semester junior status required. Permission of program lead.

EDUC 197. Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 197D. Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

Organization Leadership Courses

ORGL 100. Introduction to Organizational Leadership. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to organizational leadership focusing on what it means to be a good leader. Emphasis is placed on the practice of leadership. The course will examine the nature of leadership, and an introduction to leadership skills, concepts and ethics that will be covered in the program. Students will also be trained in digital information literacy skills – including finding, evaluating and appropriately using sources and data.

ORGL 103. Organizational Management and Leadership. 3 Units.

This course presents a comprehensive, integrative, and practical focus on leadership and management. It is based upon a framework that analyzes leadership and management at different levels: individual leadership, team leadership, and organizational leadership. This course also focused on foundational skill development as a manager/leader.

ORGL 105. Organizational Social Psychology. 3 Units.

Students study the sociological way in which the structure of organizations impinge upon the lives of individuals. Special attention will be given to the structural determinants of motivation, opportunity, power and participation within organizations. Organizational culture (roles and images), the processes of organizational change, and the recent efforts to improve the quality of work life and productivity in organizations is examined.

ORGL 107. Criminal Justice Management & Administration. 3 Units.

This course develops a foundation of concepts in organization and management unique to a criminal justice organization. Emphasis is placed on planning, management, oversight and assessment of overall organizational performance. The nature of criminal justice organizations, processes, human resources, delivery of services and the development of personnel is examined.

ORGL 135. Public Relations: Principles and Marketing. 3 Units.

The objective of this course is to increase the understanding of the Public Relations field. Emphasis is placed on marketing theory and practice, function in organizations, and PR's role in society.

ORGL 139. Organizational Communication. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview of some of the most important theories and research in the area of organizational communication. Students will learn about the essential role of communication in a number of organizational settings, and develop skills in applying organizational communication theory concepts, and perspectives to diagnose, prevent, and address organizational issues.

ORGL 143. Mediation and Conflict Management. 3 Units.

Conflict is inevitable, but it does not have to be debilitating for individuals and organizational/social systems. This course explores the theory and practice of dispute resolution using interest-based mediation and negotiation techniques. Students gain a broad understanding of mediation and negotiation strategies, learn skills that lead to greater success in managing conflict, and develop confidence in the mediation process as an effective means to resolving interpersonal, organizational, and community disputes.

ORGL 145. Issues in Human Resource Management. 3 Units.

This course explores the issues and challenges that face the human resource area in any organization. Emphasis is placed on the challenge of attracting and retaining qualified, competent employees. Organizational change and its impact on employee motivation and performance is also addressed.

ORGL 147. Leadership & Supervision in Criminal Justice. 3 Units.

This course examines the role of leadership and supervision in shaping and directing complex criminal justice organizations. Various leadership styles, roles and group dynamics are examined and applied to criminal justice organizations. This course develops a foundation for effective leadership and supervision of Criminal Justice personnel. The impact and importance of effective leadership on employee development, morale, and motivation will be a particular focus of study. Prerequisites: Acceptance into Organizational Leadership program.

ORGL 155. Professional Ethics. 3 Units.

This course investigates the ethical dimensions of professional life. Using resources from the disciplines of moral philosophy and the social and behavioral sciences, students will learn the basic shape and content of the moral dimensions of human life—both individual and corporate—and will learn to apply that content to careful and critical analysis of current professional issues. The course is not intended to provide the “right” answers to complicated moral questions, but rather to sharpen the student’s awareness of the content, shape, context, and implications of moral decision making in their lives as individuals, citizens, and professionals in a variety of industries.

ORGL 167. Criminal Justice in a Multicultural Society. 3 Units.

This course examines the complex, dynamic relationship between communities and the justice system in addressing crime and conflict with an emphasis on the challenges and prospects of administering justice within a diverse multicultural population.

ORGL 175. Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative. 3 Units.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to fundamentals of communication research. Special emphasis is on understanding the "logic" of the research process. Students develop skills in research design, data collection and analysis, and learn how to apply quantitative and qualitative research methods to solving problems. This course also helps students understand the role of ethics in communication research.

ORGL 176. Applied Research. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to help the student synthesize and integrate the learning experiences acquired in organizational behavior studies and evaluate the research and current topics relative to major emphasis areas. Students are expected to do a literature review, analyze data, write empirical reports, conduct training and workshops, and present research results.

ORGL 180. Leadership: Culture and Challenges. 3 Units.

This course focuses on how leadership skills students have developed throughout the program can be applied to have meaningful and positive impact on organizations, communities, or societies. The course looks at exemplary leaders and contemporary leadership challenges, with special consideration of the moral aspects of effective leadership. Emphasis is on integrating practical leadership skills with qualities such as authenticity, integrity, and emotional intelligence to effectively address challenges in a variety of settings including and beyond the workplace. Prerequisite: ORGL 103.

ORGL 187. Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Units.

This course examines current and relevant issues impacting the criminal justice system from a managerial and leadership perspective. Emphasis is placed on identifying current issues, trends and applying critical thinking skills, research and problem solving strategies. Topics will vary based upon current trends and issues impacting the criminal justice system.

ORGL 199. Organizational Leadership Capstone. 3 Units.

This course is designed to help students integrate their academic study of organizational leadership and their leadership experience in various organizational settings to prepare them for successfully and productively applying the skills and knowledge they have developed in the program, and in their careers and communities. Students will synthesize various perspectives, concept and methodologies, to research and analyze an organizational leadership issue or a problem and propose appropriate approaches or solutions. Prerequisites: ORGL 175, ORGL 176, and ORGL 180.

Bachelor of Arts in General Studies Program Learning Outcomes

1. Critically Thinking

  • Purposeful and self-regulated evaluative process that engages cognitive, affective, and ethical tools intended to interrogate, to understand and to respond to complex ideas or situations.

2. Written Communication

  • Communicate clearly and effectively through a wide array of writing projects to persuade, inform and educate K-12 students.

3. Oral Communication

  • Communicate clearly and effectively through a wide array of presentations and mock simulations for a variety of professional uses.

4. Information Literacy

  • Recognize when there is a need for information, identify and locate information, evaluate information, effectively and responsibly use information, and communicate that information for a variety of purposes

5. Quantitative Reasoning

  • Interpret, analyze, and represent graphical and numerical information to make and to justify decisions in everyday, civic, and occupational contexts.

Bachelor of Arts in General Studies Faculty

Brittany Auernig-Roan, Assistant Dean & Assistant Professor of Special Education, 2020, 2004, BA Sacramento State; 2009, MA Sociology Sacramento State; 2020, Ed.D Northcentral University, bauernig@pacific.edu