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Gladys L. Benerd School of Education

Education Courses

EDUC 010. Dean's Seminar. 1 Unit.

A basic introduction to the career of teaching and the programs and methodologies of the School of Education including educational requirements, professional orientation, career opportunities and school and university regulations.

EDUC 011. Children's Literature. 3 Units.

Students examine various genres of quality literature for children from preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is on how books affect the growing child and on ways to develop children’s appreciation and comprehension of stories as well as to extend their subject matter knowledge.

EDUC 100. Introduction to Language. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the central role of language in cultures and societies. Emphasis is on social and regional language variation, language and prejudice, gender and social class differences in conversation styles, the history and evolution of languages, and societal attitudes toward language and socio-political-economic influences on language use. Students gain more precision in their academic language development as they explore English grammatical structures and develop an appreciation of the work sociolinguists do through conversational analysis. As part of the University of the Pacific's general education program (1-A), this is a library intensive course. This means that students do library research, using online and other sources to meet some of the course requirements. (GE1A)

EDUC 129. Seminar: Cultural Basis of Conflict in Education. 3 Units.

Analysis of cultural diversity in American classrooms. Not open to doctoral students. (ETHC)

EDUC 130. Technology Enhanced Learning Environments. 2 Units.

This course focuses on basic skills and software for creating multimedia projects, completing assignments in all education courses, and meeting the state’s technology standards for teachers. All assignments in this course relate to building the structure and first section of a candidate’s teacher education electronic portfolio. Thereafter, candidates add sections to the portfolio during other courses and activities in their programs of study, which includes evidence that they have met the state’s technology standards. Upon graduation, the portfolios are archived in the BSE, and candidates can create a DVD of their entire portfolio or of parts they wish to use. This course is a prerequisite to Admission to Teacher Education.

EDUC 131. First and Second Language Acquisition/Linguistic Foundations. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to first and second language development, using a compare and contrast framework. It covers theoretical perspectives in first and second language acquisition and explores the relationship between theories and practice in language learning and teaching. This course addresses pedagogical implications of various theories of second language acquisition and discusses socio-cultural factors that influence second language learning. In addition, there is particular attention given to language structure (phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax) as it relates to the language development of native speakers of English as well as English language learners. This course includes a fieldwork component for which students work with young elementary students off campus once a week during the semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 100.

EDUC 140. Transformational Teaching and Learning. 4 Units.

This is an introductory course that explores the complex relationships within and among local, state, and national levels of public instruction. The course introduces historical, legal, and social issues that affect diverse educational settings. Topics include key movements and legal cases of prominence in American education; demographic information about learners and schools in California; home, family and school partnerships; and professional stages in teaching careers (e.g., subject matter preparation, teacher education, initial licensure, induction programs, and professional development). The course also includes an introduction to “reflective practice”; an overview of stages in human development; prominent learning and motivation theories; the characteristics of learners with exceptional needs; and individual differences among learners, which include English language learners. This course is taken by students interested in Multiple Subject, Single Subject and/or Educational Specialist credentials. It is a prerequisite to Admission to Teacher Education, but it is open to all students at the University. Fieldwork requires fingerprint review and clearance at local districts and TB clearance. There are fees for these services.

EDUC 141. Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum. 2 Units.

This supervised practicum is taken concurrently with EDUC 140: Transformational Teaching and Learning. Students examine the community, school, and classroom contexts and how they influence the teaching and learning process. Translation of current learning theories into practice are analyzed and applied. Students interact with K – 12 students and teachers in public school settings.

EDUC 142. Visual Arts in Education. 3 Units.

This course assists students in developing an understanding of the visual arts and how they interface with children’s development through age 18. The course acquaints students with Visual Arts curriculum in the K-12 classroom. A philosophical emphasis is be placed upon the interface of visual arts with children’s development. The course explores such concepts and processes as aesthetic perception, creative expression, visual arts heritage and aesthetic valuing, and media and materials, suitable for children through age 18. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (GE2C)

EDUC 150. Teaching and Assessment. 4 Units.

This course supports reflective teaching and learner-centered principles and practices in the K-12 schools. The course focuses on state-adopted curriculum standards and frameworks in seven content fields, particularly on the content area of History/Social Science; approaches to classroom management; selection of curriculum materials at the state level; and evaluation. Topics include implementing appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of students with special needs and culturally diverse learners; and using developmentally appropriate diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments to plan instruction. Technology is used to enhance curriculum design and student interaction with content knowledge. This course is taken concurrently with EDUC 153, Teaching STEM, for Multiple Subject candidates. EDUC 150 is taken by Education Specialist candidates. (EDUC 153 is not taken by Special Education candidates, unless they are planning to earn a Multiple Subject Credential.) Prerequisite: EDUC 140. Fingerprint and TB test clearance is required.

EDUC 153. Teaching Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. 4 Units.

Methods and curriculum presented for teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics in self-contained classrooms. Topics include state-apopted content standards and curriculum framework; essential mathematics, technology, engineering, life, physical, and earth science themes, concepts, and skills; instructional planning and diverse and appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; principles and practices of evaluation of students' learning. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 140.

EDUC 154. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Secondary Classrooms. 2 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Prerquisites: Instructor approval or C & I department permission; minimum 2.5 GPA, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 155. Teaching in the Content Areas I. 3 Units.

This is the first of a three-part course for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. Candidates learn and apply current learning theories to planning, instruction, and assessment, focusing on the general knowledge, skills, and dispositions associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. Candidates begin to learn about specific subject matter content and pedagogy and a variety of instructional and assessment strategies to benefit all learners. The needs of all secondary school students, including English Learners, and characteristics of the school environment are emphasized for fostering effective teaching and learning.

EDUC 156. Content and Disciplinary Literacy Development in Secondary Schools. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to research-based content literacy instruction. The course focuses on preparing candidates to teach content-based reading and writing skills to a full range of students which includes struggling readers, students with special needs, and English Learners. A variety of content-based literacy strategies (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) is presented to facilitate learning in the content areas. The course meets credential requirements. Prerequisites: EDUC 140, admission to Creditial Candidacy, Instructor/Curriculum and Instruction department permission, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 157. TESOL Theory and Practice. 4 Units.

This course provides a link between theory and practice in the teaching of ESL. Aspects of language learning is discussed, and concomitant instruction and curriculum is analyzed while developing a working model for the development of curriculum that is appropriate for the teaching situation.

EDUC 160. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Classrooms. 2 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Senior standing or permission of instructor.

EDUC 161. Literacy Development (Multiple Subject). 4 Units.

This course introduces methods and curriculum for teaching reading and language arts with integration of humanities and social science for students from kindergarten to eighth grade classrooms. The course focuses on theory-based effective instruction of reading, writing, listening and speaking across the curriculum. Students learn to analyze and evaluate effective literacy skills and strategies in teaching reading, writing, listening and speaking to K-8 students, and to apply and practice these skills and strategies in various instructional settings in various content areas. Emphasis is placed on the integration of reading and language arts throughout the curriculum. Twenty-four hours of fieldwork is required. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching (Professional Practice).Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education program with fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 162. Literacy Assessment (Multiple Subject). 2 Units.

This course investigates the uses of ongoing instructional diagnostic strategies in reading and language arts that guide teaching and assessment. Topics include early intervention techniques appropriate for a classroom setting and guided practice of these techniques. Fieldwork is required and shared with EDUC 161. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching and may be taken with EDUC 161 concurrently. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education with fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 163. Teaching English Learners. 4 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English profeciency in K-8 classrooms. Teachers will develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to both the California english Language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these strategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objectives include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series fieldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequiesites: EDUC 100, 140, and 150, or instructor/C & I department permission; minimum GPA of 2.5; Finerprint and TB test clearance. (ETHC)

EDUC 164. Introduction to Bilingual Education. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of bilingual education and is designed to meet the needs of both undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in understanding the role of bilingual, bicultural education in schools. Students explore the related implications of second language acquisition research, sociopolitical theory, and historical as well as contemporary experiences in the contexts of program design, instructional practice, and school/community relations toward a conceptualization of bilingual education as a source of pedagogical enrichment strategies for all learners in all settings. Prerequisites: EDUC 100 and EDUC 131. (ETHC)

EDUC 165. Teaching in the Content Areas II. 2 Units.

This is the second of a multi-course series for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. The emphasis in this course is on content-specific practices. Candidates join their respective professional organizations and participate in those organizations’ professional development experiences. In addition to whole class meetings, candidates meet in content-specific seminars with practitioners in their content areas on a regular basis.

EDUC 166. Teaching English Learners, Single Subject. 3 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English proficiency in K-12 classrooms. Teahcers develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to the California English language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these stategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objective include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series feldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 140 or instructor/C & I department permission; minimium 2.5 GPA; Fingerprint and TB test clearance. (ETHC)

EDUC 167. Adolescent Development. 3 Units.

This course is designed for secondary preservice teachers to consider the principles of adolescent development in context. Biological, cognitive, psychological, social, and moral development are examined to determine how these developmental pathways affect student achievement, motivation, and well being. The influence of family, peers, school, and the broader community on development are explored as well. Implications of current understandings of adolescent development on teaching, learning, and assessment are emphasized. In addition to class meetings, students participate in a practicum in order to apply learning in school settings.

EDUC 168. Microcomputers in Education. 3 Units.

This course introduces the student to the major concepts and applications related to the use of microcomputers in education. Students learn basic operations, terminology and capabilities of microcomputers within an educational context. Key issues related to the use of instructional technology are discussed. Application and evaluation of software for classroom instruction and management is investigated.

EDUC 169. Microcomputers and Curriculum Design. 3 Units.

Issues related to the educational application of instructional technology and its impact on education is investigated. Students do in-depth analyses of software applications and their validity in relation to learning models and the current curriculum. Students evaluate how new technologies may effect change in curriculum. Various projects that relate to evaluation of software, teaching strategies and research in new technologies are required. Prerequisite: EDUC 168 or permission of instructor.

EDUC 170. Professional Practice. 2-10 Units.

Professional practice is a full-day of Student Teaching in public schools. Candidates for a Single Subject and Multiple Subject Preliminary teaching credential are placed in local public schools for intensive application of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for professional practice in California schools. Student Teaching is full-day teaching for a semester, and undergraduates are approved for Student Teaching. Prerequisites: EDUC 130, EDUC 140, EDUC 141, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDUC 152, EDUC 161, EDUC 162, EDUC 163, EDUC172 (concurrently); SPED 125X (concurrently) with grades of “C” or higher; a minimum GPA of 2.5.; admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; a passing score on the CBEST with subject matter completed (CSET examination or approved subject matter/waiver program) and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance with TB test clearance and program assessments completed prior to Directed Teaching; Directed Teaching approval process must be completed with clearance by the Director of Field Experiences; The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework is permitted other than SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops. A candidate must petition for permission to take an additional course in advance with the Curriculum and Instruction Department’s Director of Field Experiences.

EDUC 171. Professional Practice Music. 2-10 Units.

This course is a full-day of Student Teaching in public schools. Candidates for a Single Subject Music Preliminary teaching credential are placed in local public schools for intensive application of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for professional practice in California schools. Student Teaching is full-day teaching for a semester, and undergraduates may be approved for Student Teaching. Prerequisites are EDUC 130, EDUC 140, EDUC 141, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDUC 152, EDUC 161, EDUC 162, EDUC 163, EDUC 171 (concurrently); SPED 125X (concurrently) with grades of “C” or higher; a minimum GPA of 2.5; admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; a passing score on the CBEST with subject matter completed (CSET examination or approved subject matter/waiver program) and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance with TB test clearance program assessments completed prior to Directed Teaching; completed Directed Teaching approval process with clearance by the Director of Field Experiences; The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework is permitted other than EDUC 172 and SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops. A candidate must petition for permission to take an additional course in advance with the Curriculum and Instruction Department’s Director of Field Experiences.

EDUC 172. Professional Practice Seminar. 2-10 Units.

Students reflect upon and integrate the Directed Teaching experience in large and small group settings for the SB 2042 Credential. Topics include multicultural education, child abuse, school law, interpreting standardized test scores, professional associations and negotiations, discipline plans, lesson planning and conferencing skills. This course may be taken concurrently with EDUC 170/EDUC 270.

EDUC 175. Teaching in the Content Areas III. 2 Units.

This course is the culminating part of a three-part course for Single Subject credential candidates that develops professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms schools. It is taken concurrently with the professional practice practicum (student teaching). Emphasis in the first two parts of the course is placed on acquiring and practicing general and content-specific knowledge, skills, and ethical values associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. The course is co-taught by University faculty and K-12 Content Area Specialists. In the third and final portion of the course, candidates integrate and synthesize prior learning and independently teach grades 7 – 12 students in their professional practice placements. University and Grades 7 – 12 Content Area Specialists supervise and support candidates and continue to lead seminar sessions. The capstone assessment that leads to the Level I teaching credential, the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) Teaching Event (TE) is completed as part of this course.

EDUC 180. Workshop Learning: Issues Group Leadership. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to support the learning and leadership model, Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL). The course topics include practical information (understanding motivation, managing time, dealing with dominating students, learning styles, group dynamics, study skills, helping students improve critical thinking, develop logical reasoning, and prepare for tests), a foundation in learning theory, and guidance about the specific components of the workshop lessons.

EDUC 181. ECE: Social Justice/Diversity. 3 Units.

This course is conducted as an undergraduate level seminar that is designed to examine key normative issues in the area of social justice, diversity and multiculturalism with an emphasis in early childhood education. The relation of social diversity (race, ethnicity, gender, language, societal attitudes and class) to equality in education and education reform movements is viewed from multiple contexts. Topics explored are diversity, sociopolitical aspects of history and the impact on education, and specifically, early childhood education and multiculturalism. A practicum is required in this course. (DVSY, ETHC)

EDUC 182. ECE: Curriculum and Inquiry. 3 Units.

This course is an upper division course that examines the theoretical understandings of curriculum and inquiry in the early childhood development classroom. Students refine their knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to early childhood methodology and application to young children in diverse populations.

EDUC 183. ECE: Social Contexts/Cognitive Development. 3 Units.

This course is conducted as an undergraduate level seminar that is designed to clarify the cognitive, philosophical, historical, psychological, cultural, social and ethical foundations of early childhood education. The nature of theory and practice are important to teachers of young children and this course provides a broad synthesis of knowledge of child development principles to better understand how children think, act, and how to be effective with them in the classroom.

EDUC 188. Literacy in Early Childhood Education. 3 Units.

This course will intellectually engage participants in the exploration of integrating theory, research and practice in the dimensions of literacy for young children zero to five years of age. Participants will be expected to advance their own knowledge base as they develop their ability to research, analyze, evaluate and synthesize developmental, sociocultural, linguistic, cognitive and other sign systems associated with literacy events. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

EDUC 189. Practicum. 2-4 Units.

EDUC 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 192. Preliminary Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192A. Elementary Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192B. Secondary Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192D. Early Childhood Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192E. Reading Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192F. Bilingual Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192G. Cross-cultural Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 195A. Pedagogical Seminar. 3 Units.

Investigation of the role that subject matter knowledge and its representations play in teaching. Emphasis on self-assessment of subject matter knowledge. Focus on moral and ethical dimensions of teaching and learning. Prequisite: completion of a minimum of 8 units in a concentration for the diversified major or multiple subjects wavier program. Senior status or second semester junior status required. Permission of department chair.

EDUC 197. Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 197D. Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

Educational Psychology Courses

EPSY 121X. Learner-Centered Concerns. 3 Units.

This course is a general overview of stages in human development from birth to young adulthood. Topics include prominent learning and motivation theories, learner-centered principles of teaching and assessment, the characteristics of learners with exceptional needs, and individual differences among learners including English language learners. Students who are interested in Multiple Subject, Single Subject and/or Educational Specialist credentials take this course.Twenty hours of fieldwork in K-12 public schools is required. Open to all students. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education; fingerprint review and clearance at local districts; TB test clearance (there is a fee for these services).

EPSY 191. Independent Study. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair is required.

Special Education Courses

SPED 123. The Exceptional Child. 3 Units.

Description of the characteristics and needs of children and youth with disablilities. Exploration of the etiology, treatment, educational strategies, social and vocational opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Ten hours of field experience will be required as part of the course content. This course satisfies the requirements for clearing a preliminary multiple and single subject credential as specified by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. (CTCC).

SPED 124. Assessment of Special Education Students. 3 Units.

The role of assessment in teaching students with disabilities will be explored. In addition, teacher made testx, curriculum based assessment, portfolio assessment, and commonly used standardized tests will be examined. This course will comply with the California Commisson on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for The Preliminary Level One Credential for Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate/Severe Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166. Admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 125X. Teaching Exceptional Learners. 2 Units.

This method-based course is for candidates who will be teaching students with disabilities in the general education classroom, and it includes techniques and strategies for individualizing specific student needs. The course content reviews special education law and the inclusive schools movement. Taken concurrently with Directed Teaching. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education (Credential Candidacy). Fingerprint and TB test clearance.

SPED 128M. Advanced Programming for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities. 3 Units.

Theoretical and applied information that pertains to the characteristics and educational needs of students with mild to moderate disabilities is presented. The course complies with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for the Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 128S. Advanced Programming for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities. 3 Units.

This course presents theoretical and applied information that pertains to specialized health care and sensory needs as well as educational characteristics for students with moderate/severe disabilities. This course complies with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for the Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational specialist: Moderate/Severe Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 131. Evidence Based Practices in Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Units.

Focused study on the autistic spectrum disorder through examination of research studies and applied information on effective program development. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics and educational needs of children and adults who are diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Further, students will demonstrate knowledge of evidenced based behavioral, educational and social strategies, and family impact and dynamics. Students will also demonstrate the ability to synthesize information and communicate effectively with parents, teachers, administrators, and care-givers. The course is designed for new or current professionals in education, school psychology, administration, and related helping professions. This course is a required course for all candidates for the Education Specialist credential in mild/moderate and moderate/severe disabilities.

SPED 132. Juvenile Bipolar Disorder. 3 Units.

The course will examine the diagnostic process, including the challenges of juvenile on-set bipolar disorder where presentation of the disorder is frequently confused with other conditions. Cutting edge treatment/management approaches will be examined in an integrated manner, including family dynamics, medication, and psycho-social methods. A particular emphasis will be placed on psycho-educational assessment, the role of each member of the educational team, melding appropriate educational and behavioral program development, and tools for working successfully with school programs.

SPED 142M. Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities. 3 Units.

This course presents theoretical and applied information that pertains to methods of curriculum and instruction for students with mild to moderate disabilities. This course complies with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for The Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 142S. Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities. 3 Units.

This course presents theoretical and applied information that pertains to methods of curriculum and instruction for students with moderate to severe disabilities. This course complies with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for the Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational Specialist: Moderate/Severe Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 166. Building Family-Professional Partnerships. 3 Units.

This course provides practical strategies for professional educators to effectively communicate and collaborate with families in order to enhance the capacity of families to support an advocate for children with special needs in the home, school, and community. The emotional and social needs of children with disabilities and their families, education laws and policies regarding parental/family rights, historical and current trends in family advocacy, and professional ethics are also be examined. Ten hours of field experience is required as part of the course content.

SPED 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Permission of department chair is required.

SPED 195E. Positive Behavioral Support in the Classroom. 3 Units.

Theoretical and applied information that pertains to methods of providing positive behavioral support to students with and without disabilities in educational settings are examined. This course complies with the requirements for the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational Specialist: Mild/Moderate/Severe Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 198M. Directed Teaching: Mild/Moderate. 1-10 Units.

This student teaching experience provides an opportunity for candidates in the mild/moderate credential program to apply theoretical knowledge and acquired skills to the classroom in a student teaching experience. Prerequisites: the completion of all prerequisite and required courses needed to enroll in Directed Teaching and permission of the Director of Special Education or designate.

SPED 198S. Directed Teaching: Moderate/Severe. 1-10 Units.

This student teaching experience provides an opportunity for candidates in the moderate/severe credential program to apply theoretical knowledge and acquired skills to the classroom in a student teaching experience. Prerequisites are the completion of all prerequisite and required courses needed to enroll in Directed Teaching and permission of the Director of Special Education or designate.

Diversity

  1. Students will be able to identify systemic barriers to equality and inclusiveness in the classroom, including their own biases and assumptions.  Understand the role of privilege in the classroom environment and be able to engage in educational practices to cultivate academic success in all students.

Visual and Performing Arts

  1. Students will be able to have firsthand experiences with the artistic process in a variety of art forms.  Artistic Perception, Creative Expression, arts heritage and aesthetic valuing will be explored.

Physical Education

  1. Students will be able to plan a unit of physical education instruction to choice elementary-age audience.

Written Language

  1. Students will be able to compose a variety of texts in which they demonstrate their ability to explain complex ideas clearly as well as coherently communicate important information.

Quantitative Analysis

  1. Students will be able to choose the appropriate tools to analyze and use quantitative data to define needs, set goals, plan interventions, and evaluate progress.  Substantiate decisions by making appropriate and effective graphs to communicate and visualize quantitative information.

History

  1. Students will create a diagnostic assessment using backward design.
  2. Students will create a performance assessment for fourth grade California history.
  3. Students will create a direct instruction lesson plan based on digital media archives on the Delta and complete the Elementary History Task related to edTPA.

Science

  1. Students will be able to plan and enact appropriate science instruction that reflects the contributions of Vygotsky, Piaget and other cognitive and developmental psychologists.  Accurately judge the appropriateness of particular science content for students and assist in modifying such content for those students.  Modify lesson plans to more accurately and explicitly address the nature of science.

Gladys L. Benerd School of Education Faculty

Linda Webster, Interim Dean; Professor, 1996, BA, California State University, Fresno, 1981; MA, University of California, Berkeley, 1984; PhD, UC Berkeley, 1988, lwebster@pacific.edu, 209-946-2197, Room 101G

Rod Githens, Assistant Dean (SAC); Interim Program Lead Learning, Leadership, and Change; Associate Professor, 2015, BS, Lincoln Christian College, 1999; BS, Illinois State University, 1999; EdM, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004; PhD, 2008, rgithens@pacific.edu, 209-946-2686, Room 100B

Christina Rusk, Interim Assistant Dean; Educator Preparation Program Lead Special Education; Assistant Professor, 2016, BA, St. Ambrose University, 2000; MS, Ft. Hays University, 2010; EdD, University of the Pacific, 2016, crusk@pacific.edu, 209-946-2306, Room 116

Lisa M. Cheney, Director of Field Placements for Counseling & School Psychology; Assistant Professor, 2019, BS, California Polytechnic State University, 2001; MA, University of the Pacific, 2003; EdS, University of the Pacific, 2004, lcheney1@pacific.edu, 209-946-2104, Room 101B

Christopher Ludwig, Director, Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences Athletic Training Program; Clinical Assistant Professor, BS, California State University, Fresno, 2004; MS, California State University, Fullerton, 2007; EdD, University of the Pacific, 2014, cludwig@pacific.edu, 209-946-2282, Main Gym, Room 204

Charlane Starks, Director of the Office of Field Placements Educator Preparation Program; Assistant Professor, 2019, BS, Western Michigan University, 1987; MA, Sacramento State University 2010; EdD, University of the Pacific, 2014, cstarks@pacific.edu, 209-946-2335, Room 105

Laura Aguada-Hallberg, Program Lead EdD Transformative Action in Education; Assistant Professor, 2018, BA, Humboldt State University 1993; MS, University of New England, 2009; EdD, University of New England, 2015, lhallberg@pacific.edu, 209-946-2086

Ruth V. Brittin, Professor of Music Education, 1998, BM, Texas Tech University, 1983; MM Texas Tech University, 1985; PhD, Florida State University, 1989, rbrittin@pacific.edu, 209-946-2408

Amy Scott Brown, Associate Professor, 2007, BA, University of California, Berkeley, 2000; MA, Arizona State University, 2002; PhD, Arizona State University, 2006, ascott2@pacific.edu, 209-946-3276, Room 101D

Rhonda Bryant, Associate Professor, 2015, BA, University of Virginia, 1985; MEd, University of Virginia, 1987; PhD, University of Virginia, 2000, rbryant@pacific.edu, 209-946-2365

Kellie Cain, Program Lead Single Subject Credential and Degree Programs; Assistant Professor, 2002, BA, University of California, Davis, 1987; MA, University of the Pacific, 1999; EdD, University of the Pacific, 2005, kcain@pacific.edu, 209-946-2687, Room 115B

Rachelle Hackett, Professor, 1994, AA, Modesto Junior College, 1980; BA California State University, Stanislaus, 1982; MS, Stanford University, 1986; PhD, Stanford University, 1994, rhackett@pacific.edu, 209-946-2678, Room 112

Justin Low, Program Lead Counseling and School Psychology; Associate Professor, 2010, BS, Brigham Young University, 2003; MA, The University of Texas at Austin, 2008; PhD, The University of Texas at Austin, 2010, jlow1@pacific.edu, 209-946-3254, Room 101C

Delores E. McNair, Program Lead EdD Educational & Organizational Leadership; Associate Professor, 2006, BA, Holy Names College, 1988; MPA, University of Southern California, 1988; EdD, Oregon State University, 2002, dmcnair@pacific.edu, 209-946-2674, Room 114

Elaine Mo, Associate Professor, 2011, BA, University of California, Los Angeles, 1994; EdM, Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2003; EdD, Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2010, emo@pacific.edu, 209-946-2852, Room 106

Thomas G. Nelson, Associate Professor of Education, 1995, BA, California State University, Northridge, 1975; MA, California State University, Sacramento, 1988; PhD, University of Arizona, 1993, tnelson@pacific.edu, 209-946-3253, Room 204D

Robert Oprandy, Professor of Education, 2002, BA, Rutgers University, 1969; MA, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1977; MEd, 1979; EdD, 1988, roprandy@pacific.edu, 209-946-2671, Room 115A

Gregory R. Potter, Program Lead Multiple Subject Credential and Degree Programs; Assistant Professor, 2002, AB, University of California, Davis, 1992; MS, UC Davis, 1996; PhD, UC Davis, 2000, gpotter@pacific.edu, 209-946-2672, Room 204B

Wendy Shirer, Master Teacher in Residence, 2019, BA, California State University, Stanislaus, 2005; MA, University of the Pacific, 2010, wshirer@pacific.edu, 209-946-3915, Room 214

Heidi J. Stevenson, Associate Professor of Education, 2004, BA, University of California, Davis, 1995; MA, Chapman University, 2001; EdD, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2004, hstevenson@pacific.edu, 209-946-2681, Room 211

Peter Wang, Clinical Assistant Professor & Clinical Education Coordinator, Athletic Training Program, BS, University of California, Davis, 1994; MA, University of Nevada - Reno, 1998; MPH, University of Nevada - Reno, 2006, pwang@pacific.edu , 209-946-3182, Main Gym, Room 212