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This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.pacific.edu.

Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences

http://www.pacific.edu/Academics/Schools-and-Colleges/College-of-the-Pacific/Academics/Departments-and-Programs/Health-Exercise-and-Sport-Sciences.html
Phone: (209) 946-2209
Location: Main Gym

Pete Schroeder, Chair and Graduate Studies Coordinator

The graduate program in Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences provides for scholarly study in the areas of exercise science, sport pedagogy and sport management. Tracks include a core content in health, exercise and sport sciences courses. Students can cater their programs of study to particular interests with supplementary courses in other departments (e.g., biology, business, chemistry, communication, education, psychology). Graduate students are also encouraged to include experiential leaning and collaborative research in their programs of study.

Programs Offered

Master of Arts

  • Exercise Science
  • Sport Pedagogy
  • Sport Management

Admission Requirements

  1. Undergraduate degree in health, exercise and sport sciences, a related discipline,  or completion of essential undergraduate prerequisites, as determined by the Graduate Studies Committee.
  2. Completion of the Graduate Records Examination (GRE)

 

Master of Arts in Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences

Plan A Thesis

Students must complete a minimum of 32 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 3.0 in order to earn the master of arts degree in health, exercise and sport sciences. Twenty (20) of these units must be completed in health, exercise and sport sciences courses.  Twelve (12) units may be completed in other departments. 

Courses must be graded B- (2.7) or higher to be counted toward the degree program.

SPTS 279Research Methods in Sport Sciences4

 

Note: 1) Fulfillment of the prerequisite requirement for SPTS 279: i.e., completion of a course in statistics or an introduction to research course that involves statistical analysis of data, with a B- or better. 2) Units received for meeting this prerequisite requirement may not be included among the minimum units required for the master’s degree. 3) Courses may be taken concurrently.

Six SPTS approved electives (12 of these units must be at the 200 level. Department may require that all must be at the 200 level) 2424
SPTS 299Thesis4

 

Note: 1) Students consult with an advisor regarding thesis committee members. The thesis committee should include a minimum of three members. A committee member may be selected from outside the department when an area of study crosses disciplinary lines. 2) Students present an open colloquium that outlines the proposed thesis problem and basic design for problem-solving. 3) Students must satisfactorily complete thesis during semester of registration or maintain continuing registration status until completed.

ORAL EXAM Must satisfactorily complete an open final oral examination encompassing the thesis and general professional knowledge.

Plan B Non Thesis

Students must complete a minimum of 32 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 3.0 in order to earn the master of arts degree in health, exercise and sport sciences. Twenty (20) of these units must be completed in health, exercise and sport sciences courses.  Twelve (12) units may be completed in other departments. 

Courses must be graded B- (2.7) or higher to be counted toward the degree program.

SPTS 279Research Methods in Sport Sciences4

 

Note: 1) Fulfillment of the prerequisite requirement for SPTS 279: i.e., completion of a course in statistics or an introduction to research course involving statistical analysis of data, with a B- or better. 2) Units received for meeting this prerequisite requirement may not be included among the minimum units required for the master’s degree. 3) Courses may be taken concurrently.

Seven SPTS approved electives (16 of these units must be at the 200 level)28

 

Comprehensive Exam

Must satisfactorily complete a written comprehensive examination covering three general/comprehensive disciplinary areas.

Note: 1) The examination may be taken during the latter part of the semester in which coursework is being completed. The student’s graduate faculty advisor serves as the coordinator of the Comprehensive Examination, and the coordinator has the responsibility of obtaining questions from the appropriate colleagues. The examination questions are forwarded to the Graduate Studies Coordinator/or designee who schedules and administers the examination. Following a review of the written examination by appropriate instructors, the results are transmitted to the student in writing. There is a departmental mechanism by which a student who has an unsuccessful result may apply for retesting in consultation with the Graduate Studies Committee.

General Guidelines Applicable to both Plan A and Plan B Students

  1. An individual Plan A or Plan B study program is to be approved by the end of the first semester of study. Programs developed by the student and advisor are submitted to the department chair for review and approval. Changes in programs may subsequently be made by following the same review-approval process.
  2. The student is assigned to a graduate faculty advisor based on student/faculty interest and in consultation with the Graduate Studies Coordinator.
  3. All independent studies and/or independent research must be reviewed and approved by the department chair or Graduate Coordinator prior to registration.
  4. Dates for open colloquiums, written comprehensive examinations and final oral examinations are to be coordinated through the Graduate Studies Coordinator.
Sport Sciences Courses

SPTS 100. Introduction to Research. 3 Units.

This class is designed to develop research skills specific to the fields within sport sciences. Students learn to collect, review, synthesize and critically analyze scholarly research. Students also be able to create research questions and establish hypotheses, and they are exposed to a variety of ways to collect data and learn to apply the appropriate techniques to interpret data. Finally, this course presents the ways in which research can be applied to sport sciences. The course is only open to Sport Sciences Majors with sophomore standing or higher.

SPTS 120. Instructional Strategies and Methods of Teaching and Coaching. 4 Units.

SPTS 120 is designed for the future physical educator or coach to deliver an effective, meaningful physical education curriculum to a diverse population of students. Emphasis is on physical education pedagogy; the skills and techniques that successful teachers use to ensure student learning. Students engage in guided teaching and systematic observation experiences at the primary and secondary school levels in an effort to introduce them to effective teaching and coaching behaviors.

SPTS 121. Analysis of Team and Individual Sports. 3 Units.

An applied motor learning approach to skill acquisition for team and Individual sports. In addition to personal skill development, students learn to prepare the introduction, explanation and demonstration of sports skills; develop and maintain skill levels through practice and reinforcement; analyze movement by systematically observing performance; utilize biomechanical concepts to analyze, correct and enhance performance and cognitive processes to improve performance. Ten to 15 different team and individual sports presented and instruction time per sport varies. Lab fee required.

SPTS 123. Analysis of Nontraditional Games and Sports. 3 Units.

An applied motor learning approach to skill acquisition for nontraditional games and sports. A variety of nontraditional games and outdoor activities embedded in the CA curriculum framework for physical education. Clinical experience is provided for secondary students in the community. Eight to 10 different nontraditional games and sports presented and instruction time per sport varies. Lab fee required.

SPTS 127. History and Philosophy of Sport and PE. 3 Units.

The course is designed to explore the development of sports and physical education from Ancient Greece to the present day. Students examine the organization, purpose and goals of sports and PE programs and critically evaluate a range of topics including but not limited to: performance-enhancing practices, equity and inclusion and health-related trends. The intention is to develop the students' understanding of the historical and philosophical foundations of sports and PE and examine the implications of these for goals, scope and components of sport and PE programs in America.

SPTS 129. Principles of Exercise Physiology. 4 Units.

A course designed to meet the broad needs of Sports Sciences majors, utilizing a practical approach based on underlying physiological principles as guidelines for exercise practices, as found in physical education, athletics, adult exercise prescription and other settings. Outside laboratory assignments are carried out for the purpose of demonstrating basic physiological responses and the resulting principles that are drawn from them for application in exercise and testing settings. Lab fee required.

SPTS 131. Assessment and Evaluation. 4 Units.

This course is the development of competencies of Sport Sciences majors for the design and implementation of procedures to appropriately measure and evaluate students, clients and/or programs. Basic data acquisition methods and statistical analysis techniques are presented. A Lab fee is required.

SPTS 133. Kinesiology. 4 Units.

This course is a functional study of musculoskeletal anatomy and its relationship to human movement, posture, exercise prescription, and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: BIOL 011 or 051 or 061 or permission of instructor, and lab fee required.

SPTS 135. Sports Nutrition. 4 Units.

Students study the principles of nutrition as they relate to health and participation in sports or physical activity. Topics include calculating energy needs and expenditures, energy balance and the role of carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamins, minerals, and water in sports nutrition.

SPTS 137. Psycho-Social Aspects of Sport. 3 Units.

Students study the manner in which psychological factors influence sport performance and the manner in which sport participation can influence the human psyche. Theories concerning the relationship between human cognition, behavior and sport performance are covered. Particular emphasis is given to the practical application of these theories.

SPTS 139. Exercise Psychology. 4 Units.

This course employs the theories and methods of psychology to examine the related fields of competitive sports, fitness, exercise, and rehabilitation from injury. Major questions addressed in the course include: How do psychological factors influence participation in physical activity and performance of the individual? How does participation in physical activity or incapacity due to an injury affect the psychological make-up of the individual? These questions are explored from educational, coaching, research, and clinical perspectives.

SPTS 141. Sport in America. 4 Units.

This course is designed to explore the relationship between sport, culture and society in both the USA and the broader global world. Students learn to critically examine a wide range of topics that include, but not limited to, sport & gender, sport & race, global sports worlds, drugs and violence in sport, sport & politics and the crime-sport nexus. The intention of this course is to develop the student’s sociological imagination and encourage the student to think critically about the role sport plays in the development of societies, ideologies and everyday life.

SPTS 142. Sport and Globalization. 4 Units.

This course examines the interaction between sport and globalization. The foundation of the course is to provide a basic understanding of globalization and its underlying forces. will provide a foundation for the course. The main focus of the course is the reciprocal nature of sport and globalization with special attention given to sport economic, cultural, and political issues. This course explores sport tourism and the Olympics as the two main intersections of sport and globalization.

SPTS 143. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of the field of athletic training, its organization, and the responsibilities of a certified athletic trainer (ATC) as part of the sports medicine team. Instruction emphasizes prevention, recognition, and immediate care of injuries and illnesses associated with physical activity. This course is recommended for freshman and a lab fee is required.

SPTS 145. Therapeutic Modalities. 4 Units.

This course is a lecture and laboratory experience designed to expose the student to the theory, principles, techniques and application of therapeutic modalities pertaining to the treatment of athletic or activity related injuries. Topics include discussions of the physiological effects, indications, contra indications, dosage and maintenance of each modality. Recommended: BIOL 081. Lab fee is required.

SPTS 146. Health, Disease, and Pharmacology. 4 Units.

This course is an in-depth exploration of physical, mental, and social health with specific emphasis on recognizing the signs, symptoms, and predisposing conditions associated with the progression of specific illnesses and diseases as they relate to the physically active individual. Students also develop an awareness of the indications, contraindications, precautions, and interactions of medications used to treat those illnesses and diseases.

SPTS 147. Exercise Physiology I. 4 Units.

Exercise and prescription: This course is primarily designed to familiarize students with the hands-on training and theoretical background needed to competently assess levels of wellness/fitness in an "apparently healthy" (i.e. low risk) adult population. The topics and skills addressed include measurement protocols for the health-related components of fitness. These skills are used to prescribe lifestyle and/or exercise modifications that improve health. Prerequisite: BIOL 011, 041, 051 or 061. Lab fee required.

SPTS 149. Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis I. 3 Units.

This course presents an in-depth study of musculoskeletal assessment of the lower extremity, thoracic and lumbar spine for the purpose of identifying (a) common acquired or congenital risk factors that would predispose an individual to injury and/or (b) musculoskeletal injury common to athletics or physical activity. Students receive instruction in obtaining a medical history, performing a visual observation, palpating bones and soft tissues, and performing appropriate special tests for injuries and conditions of the foot, ankle, lower leg, knee, thigh, hip, pelvis, lumbar and thoracic spine. This course is directed toward students who pursue athletic training and/or physical therapy professions. Prerequisite: SPTS 133 or BIOL 071 , and a lab fee is required.

SPTS 150. Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis II. 3 Units.

This course presents an in-depth study of musculoskeletal assessment of the upper extremity, cervical spine, head and face for the purpose of identifying (a) common acquired or congenital risk factors that would predispose an individual to injury and/or (b) musculoskeletal injury common to athletics or physical activity. Students receive instruction in obtaining a medical history, performing a visual observation, palpating bones and soft tissues, and performing appropriate special tests for injuries and conditions of the shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, fingers, thumb, cervical spine, head, and face. This course is directed toward students who pursue athletic training and/or physical therapy professions. Students may take this course independent of SPTS 149. Prerequisite: SPTS 133 or BIOL 071. Lab fee is required.

SPTS 151. Elementary Physical Education. 3 Units.

This course is designed to prepare students for employment in an elementary school setting and provide them with the tools necessary to formulate and implement a comprehensive elementary PE experience for all students. Participants learn a wide range of teaching skills that facilitate the ability to create a quality active learning environment in elementary PE. Students explore effective teaching and assessment strategies, classroom management skills, the use of constructive feedback, the negotiation of diverse classrooms and the development of appropriate student learning outcomes. Students also are introduced to the subject matter of elementary PE and will undertake several teaching episodes. This course encourages students to engage in reflexive teaching practices, develop physically educated young people, maximize student involvement and enjoyment in PE and integrate core curriculum subject matter into PE lessons.

SPTS 152. Secondary Physical Education. 4 Units.

SPTS 152 is designed for junior/senior level students in the Sport Sciences/Sport Pedagogy concentration to deliver an effective, meaningful physical education curriculum to diverse students. This course covers curriculum components that include content, content organization, distinctive curriculum models and aspects of curriculum application. Students learn how to sustain a positive learning experience, conceive and plan meaningful curricula for school based instruction, and link the school program to opportunities for adolescents outside of school. Prerequisites: SPTS 121, 123, 151.

SPTS 153. Equity and Inclusion in Physical Education. 4 Units.

This course is designed to provide students with the theoretical and practical tools necessary to teach PE within a diverse classroom. Students learn a wide range of teaching skills that facilitate their ability to create a quality inclusive learning environment in Physical Education. Particular attention is paid to the following diversity categories, disabilities, gender, ethnicity and social class. Students explore a variety of adapted PE activities, federal/state legislative mandates and related polices, effective teaching and assessment strategies, classroom management skills, the use of constructive feedback and the development of appropriate student learning outcomes within diverse classrooms. Students undertake a number of peer-to-peer teaching episodes. The course encourages the students to engage in reflexive teaching practices, develop inclusive PE lessons sensitive to diversity issues and maximize student involvement and enjoyment in PE.

SPTS 155. Motor Learning. 3 Units.

This course examines aspects of skilled performance and motor learning from a developmental perspective. It is concerned with the major principles of human performance and skill learning, the progressive development of a conceptual model of human actions and the development of skill through training and practice. Topics include human information processing, decision-making and movement planning, perceptual processes relevant to human movement, production of movement skills, measurement of learning, practice design, preparation, organization, and scheduling,; use of feedback, in addition to the application of motor learning principles to sport, physical education, industrial and physical therapy settings.

SPTS 157. Clinician in Sports Medicine. 4 Units.

This course integrates theory and practice and requires students to develop a research topic, consistent with an explicitly and narrowly defined area of interest. Permission of instructor is required.

SPTS 159. Sport Pedagogy. 3 Units.

SPTS 159 is designed for the future physical educator to deliver an effective, meaningful physical education experience to diverse students and help them sustain it through the knowledge to conceive and plan meaningful curricula, the administrative skill to produce an organizational structure within school time that optimizes the impact of the program, and the creative energy to link the school program to opportunities for children and youths outside of school. Prerequisites: SPTS 131, 151.

SPTS 161. Biomechanics of Human Movement. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the biomechanics of human movement and the analytic procedures and techniques for subsequent application in the sport sciences and related fields. The course includes a review of basic functional/mechanical human anatomy and kinesiology. Outcome objectives are an understanding of mechanical principles governing human movement, skill in use of a variety of measurement techniques commonly applied in biomechanics, an ability to analyze motor skill performance via cinematographic/ computer methodologies and skill in prescriptively communicating results of analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 011 or 051 or 061 or permission of instructor, and a lab fee is required.

SPTS 163. Therapeutic Exercise. 4 Units.

This course is an application of the theory and principles associated with therapeutic exercise and the application of various rehabilitation techniques and procedures during the course of an athlete’s rehabilitation to attain normal range of motion, strength, flexibility, and endurance. Prerequisite: SPTS 133 or permission of instructor, and a lab fee is required.

SPTS 165. Sports Law. 4 Units.

This course addresses legal issues and responsibilities relevant to professionals in the areas of sports medicine, sport management, sport pedagogy and athletics. General legal principles supported by case law in such areas as negligence, contract law, constitutional law, antitrust laws and unlawful discrimination are offered. Junior standing or permission of instructor is required.

SPTS 167. Introduction to Sport Management. 4 Units.

This course is for beginning sport management students and students interested in sport business. Students study general academic, managerial, and business concepts related to sport and explore the variety of sport and fitness-related businesses and organizations within the public and private sectors. Potential career opportunities are considered.

SPTS 169. Managing Sport Enterprises. 4 Units.

This course is the application of theory and concepts to agency management. Study areas include: management theories and formal organization relevant to organizational goals, legal concerns and policy development, decision-making, marketing, time management, budgeting and financial management, personnel management and communication, motivation, crisis management, productive training and evaluation. An essential part of the course lies in the development of individual management skills. Prerequisite: SPTS 167 or permission of instructor.

SPTS 171. Sport Economics and Finance. 4 Units.

This course is designed to address the respective areas of sport economics, finance, and labor relations. Both theoretical and practical aspects are explored. Students examine sport as a multi-billion dollar industry and analyze the role of sport within the larger socio-economic structure within the United States and internationally. Prerequisites: ECON 053 and BUSI 031 and Junior standing.

SPTS 172. Case Analysis in Sport and Fitness Management. 4 Units.

This course addresses the principles and practices pertinent to the development and operation of the private and commercial sport or fitness enterprise. The case study method focuses on designing and implementing the prospectus, feasibility studies, and the analysis of organizational effectiveness. Topics of special interest include the planning and controlling of resources, facility operations, and strategies for production and operations management.

SPTS 173. Health Care Management & Professional Develop. 4 Units.

SPTS 173 is an in-depth study of the management of health care organizations related to finances, facilities, equipment, organizations structures, medical/insurance records, risk management, human relations, and personnel. Practical and conceptual skills are taught to help students focus on more efficient health care delivery. Also covered is the development of leadership skills, future trends in health care management, guidelines for designing effective work groups and managing conflict.

SPTS 174. Sport Marketing and Promotions. 4 Units.

This course is an in-depth study of the specific challenges associated with the field of sport and life-style marketing. Mainstream marketing theory and principles are applied to develop an understanding of sport marketing research, sport consumer behavior, sponsorship, promotions, information management, public relations, and the segmentation process. Prerequisite: SPTS 169.

SPTS 175. Sport Event and Facility Management. 4 Units.

This course is a comprehensive investigation into the principles needed to design, implement, and manage all types of sport events and facilities. Planning, logistics, risk management, human resource management, and marketing of events and facilities are given special attention. Opportunities for the application of these principles are also provided. Prerequisites: BUSI 107 and SPTS 174.

SPTS 177. Exercise Physiology II. 4 Units.

This course seeks to fulfill two main objectives: 1) To establish a foundational understanding of clinical exercise testing used to examine cardiac, metabolic and respiratory pathology. 2) To provide a more in-depth examination of several basic exercise physiology concepts introduced in Exercise Physiology I. These include lactate kinetics, oxygen dynamics, pulmonary function and cardiovascular function during exercise and in response to training. Prerequisite: SPTS 147, and a lab fee is required.

SPTS 179. Introduction to Research. 4 Units.

SPTS 182. Exercise Testing/Prescription. 4 Units.

This course is primarily designed to provide students with the hands-on training and theoretical background to competently assess levels of wellness/fitness in an “apparently healthy” (i.e. low risk) adult population. The topics and skills addressed include health screening protocols/risk stratification, use of Informed Consent documents, as well as measurement protocols for the health-related components of fitness (i.e. cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness, flexibility, body composition). These skills are then used to prescribe lifestyle and/or exercise modifications that result in individual progress toward a desired goal. The content of this course is highly focused toward the knowledge and skills required for taking the ACSM Fitness Specialist (HFS) certification exam.

SPTS 187. Internship in Sports Medicine. 4 Units.

This course provides an opportunity for qualifying students to work in an area of Sports Medicine that interests them. Prerequisites: SPTS 157, GPA 2.0 and no grade in major below C- in addition to approval of course supervisor.

SPTS 187A. Internship: Sport Management. 4 Units.

The internship in Sport Management at the University of the Pacific is a management and leadership experience for upper division majors who have successfully completed a majority of their theory classes. Prerequisites: SPTS 175 and permission of instructor. Grading is Pass/No credit only.

SPTS 187B. Internship: Sport Management. 4 Units.

The internship in Sport Management at the University of the Pacific is a management and leadership experience for upper division majors who have successfully completed a majority of their theory classes. Prerequisites: SPTS 175 and permission of instructor. Grading is Pass/No credit only.

SPTS 187D. Sport Pedagogy Internship I. 2 Units.

This class involves the student completing a semester-long internship connected to their chosen field of sport pedagogy. This internship develops their evaluation skills and encourage the student to engage in reflexive teaching practices to better prepare themselves for the challenges and terrain of their post-graduation employment. Prerequisite: SPTS 131.

SPTS 187E. Sport Pedagogy Internship II. 4 Units.

This class involves the student completing a semester-long internship connected to their chosen field of sport pedagogy. This internship develops their evaluation skills and encourage the student to engage in reflexive teaching practices to better prepare themselves for the challenges and terrain of their post-graduation employment. Prerequisite: SPTS 187D.

SPTS 189. Practicum. 1 OR 2 Unit.

The practicum offers non-classroom experiences in activities related to Sports Sciences, under conditions determined by the appropriate faculty member. SPTS 189 represents advanced practicum work involving increased independence and responsibility. Enrollment is limited to eight units maximum of 089/189A, B, C, D, H, J, K offerings and no category within a course may be repeated for credit. A list of specific courses follows.

SPTS 189A. Practicum: Adapted Physical Education. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sports Medicine. See SPTS 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations.

SPTS 189B. Practicum: Athletic Training III. 2 Units.

A clinical education course in the field of athletic training. It incorporates an experiential learning environment designed to prepare students for a career in athletic training. Advanced skills are introduced within the daily operations of the athletic training room and in the care of the athletes. Criteria for progression must be met before enrolling in subsequent practicum course. Prerequisite: SPTS 089K.

SPTS 189C. Practicum: Biomechanics. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sports Medicine. See SPTS 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations.

SPTS 189D. Practicum: Exercise Physiology. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sports Medicine. See SPTS 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations.

SPTS 189E. Practicum: Sport Pedagogy. 2 Units.

This course offers a supervised leadership experience in the elementary or secondary school setting. The student works as a physical education specialist and develops as well as conducts appropriate physical activity programs. Prerequisites: SPTS 151 or SPTS 159 and permission of instructor.

SPTS 189F. Practicum: Coaching. 2 Units.

Students are assigned to an intercollegiate or interscholastic sports team for the semester and participate in practice sessions throughout the specific sport season. Written guidelines are developed cooperatively by the supervisor, coach and student. Prerequisites: SPTS 139 and SPTS 155.

SPTS 189G. Practicum: Coaching. 2 Units.

Students will be assigned to an intercollegiate or interscholarship sports team for the semester and will participate in practice sessions throughout the specific sport season. Written guideliness will be developed cooperatively by the supervisor, coach and student. Prequisites: SPTS 139 and 155.

SPTS 189H. Practicum: Sports Law. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sports Medicine. See SPTS 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations.

SPTS 189J. Pracitum: Kinesiology. 2 Units.

These courses provide advanced practicum work in Sports Medicine. See SPTS 089 for subcategories and enrollment limitations.

SPTS 189K. Practicum: Athletic Training IV. 2 Units.

This clinical education course is in the field of athletic training. It incorporates an experiential learning environment designed to prepare students for a career in athletic training. The focus of this course is mastery of all entry-level skills encountered within the daily operations of the athletic training room and in the care of the athletes. Students go through final preparations for the NATABOC examination. Prerequisite: SPTS 189B.

SPTS 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Unit.

SPTS 195. Ethical Issues in Sport. 3 Units.

SPTS 197. Independent Research. 1-4 Unit.

SPTS 233. Advanced Kinesiology. 4 Units.

This graduate seminar considers the musculoskeletal analysis of human movement, posture, exercise prescription, and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: SPTS 133 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing.

SPTS 235. Graduate Nutrition/Exercise Metabolism. 4 Units.

Students study the principles of nutrition as they relate to health and participation in sport or physical activity. The course includes calculation of energy needs and expenditures, and the role of carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, minerals, and water in sport and physical activity.

SPTS 237. Advanced Sport Psychology. 4 Units.

This course provides a detailed examination of the theories and concepts that explain how the human psyche affects sport performance. Particular emphasis is given to the application of these concepts for coaches and athletes.

SPTS 239. Advanced Applied Sport Psychology. 4 Units.

This graduate seminar is designed for advanced students to explore theoretical concepts of psychology as they relate to individual and group behavior in physical activity environments.

SPTS 241. Advanced Sociology of Sport. 4 Units.

This graduate seminar deals with theoretical concepts of sociology related to the American sport environment. This course uses a sociological perspective to provide an appreciation of sport as an integral part of our cultural dynamics. The relationship of sport and other social institutions such as media, economy, politics, and education are covered, as well as the relationship of sport and social stratification such as gender, race, and class.

SPTS 242. Global Sports Worlds. 4 Units.

Like all social institutions in the United States, global forces are increasingly shaping the sports worlds we live in. Understanding this phenomenon is imperative for future practitioners with sport sciences. This course is designed to explore this relationship between sport and globalization processes. You will learn to identify the characteristics of the sport-globalization nexus and critically examine its consequences. Through a host of experiential learning opportunities, you will develop a deeper understanding of the implications of global sports worlds in your field of study. The eight pre-trip meetings take place during the Spring semester(one per week from Spring break onwards). The trip to London is schedule after these meetings each year. The students will register for the class as a Spring course. Prerequisite: Travel required; Graduate standing; SPTS 279 or permission of the instructor.

SPTS 247. Advanced Exercise Physiology. 4 Units.

This course is an advanced study of physiological responses to exercise with emphasis on laboratory methods and procedures for testing and demonstrating these responses for research application. Lab fee is required. Prerequisites: SPTS 147 and permission of the instructor.

SPTS 248. Applied and Clinical Physiology. 4 Units.

This course is designed to study the fundamental principles of exercise testing and interpretation for high risk, healthy, and athletic populations. The course is structured to focus on the cardiovascular, metabolic, and pulmonary responses to aerobic exercise and implications for designing training programs to enhance health, fitness, and performance. This course serves as a foundation for clinical exercise science and the use of exercise testing in the study of cardiac, metabolic and respiratory pathology.

SPTS 253. Advanced Adapted Physical Education. 4 Units.

This course provides the culminating learning experience for those teaching credential candidates who are completing the waiver program with an emphasis in adapted physical education. Lab fee required.

SPTS 255. Advanced Motor Learning. 4 Units.

This graduate course examines both the information processing and dynamical systems approaches to the study of human motor behavior and skill acquisition. Content is theoretically and research based with a behavioral emphasis. Topics covered include variability and motor control, visual control of action, the role of reflexes, task interference, limitations in information processing, effects of stress on performance, and the Schema theory. It is intended to provide students with an advanced understanding of the conceptual, functional properties of the motor system and human motor performance and their application to teaching, coaching, industrial and therapeutic settings.

SPTS 257. Advanced Clinician in Sports Medicine. 4 Units.

This course integrates theory and practice and requires students to develop a research topic, consistent with an explicitly and narrowly defined area of interest. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SPTS 259. Professional Preparation in Sport Sciences. 4 Units.

This course is designed for the future professional practitioner who wishes to deliver an effective, meaningful clinical or educational experience to a diverse population. The course helps them sustain the experiences through the knowledge to conceive and plan meaningful programs, the administrative skill to produce an organizational structure within school and/or practicum that optimizes the impact of the program, and the creative energy to link the program to opportunities for children and adults. Students engage in an in-depth study of the research on teaching and the application of research-based knowledge to the teaching and clinical professions.

SPTS 261. Advanced Biomechanics of Sport. 4 Units.

This course is an advanced study of mechanical principles which influence human movement. Both non-cinematographic and cinematographic/videographic techniques are used to analyze and evaluate motor skills and errors in performance and critical evaluation of current research findings in biomechanics. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in kinesiology or biomechanics or permission of instructor.

SPTS 265. Advanced Sports Law. 4 Units.

This course addresses legal issues and responsibilities relevant to professionals in the areas of sports medicine, sport management, sport pedagogy and athletics. General legal principles supported by case law in such areas as negligence, contract law, constitutional law, antitrust laws and unlawful discrimination are offered.

SPTS 269. Advanced Management of Sport Enterprises. 4 Units.

The purpose of this class is to prepare graduate students to lead in the unique business environment of sport. The unique governance structure of intercollegiate athletics and professional sports is presented. Students then develop a multi-frame approach to management of sport organizations. Students also explore the subjective nature of leadership to develop a style best suited for sport. Emphasis is placed on the integration of applied research that uses leadership and management theories.

SPTS 272. Advanced Case Analysis of Sport and Fitness Management. 4 Units.

This graduate seminar is designed to provide breadth and depth of topical knowledge beyond that covered in the introductory course.

SPTS 274. Advanced Sport Marketing and Promotions. 4 Units.

This course provides an in-depth study of the unique nature of sport marketing that focuses on three areas. Students learn how to market sport products and events. The course explores the many mechanisms through which sport is used as a marketing tool. Finally, students learn to gain maximum benefit from the relationship between sport and the media.

SPTS 275. Advanced Sport Management. 4 Units.

This class provides graduate students with the knowledge base necessary to lead the mega-events and manage multipurpose and single-use facilities common in sport. The first portion of the course is devoted to event planning, marketing and execution. The second part of the course focuses on planning, design and maintenance of sports facilities. Special attention is given to the environmental impact of sporting events and facilities.

SPTS 279. Research Methods in Sport Sciences. 4 Units.

This in-depth evaluation of the various methods used in the disciplines of the sport sciences, includes experimental, descriptive, qualitative and historical approaches. Students learn the means of selecting a research problem and planning its solution as well as important considerations to regard in reviewing the literature. The course also includes an overview of proper form and style in research writing. Student must complete a fully developed Research Proposal as part of this course. Prerequisite: a course in statistics. Graduate standing.

SPTS 287. Advanced Internship: Sport Medicine. 4 Units.

This course provides an opportunity for qualifying students to work in an area of sports medicine that interests them. Prerequisites: SPTS 257 and permission of instructor. Graduate standing.

SPTS 287A. Advanced Internship: Sport Management. 4 Units.

This course provides professional leadership experience for graduate students. Agency placement is based on student goals and professional leadership background.

SPTS 287B. Advanced Internship: Sport Management. 4 Units.

This course provides professional leadership experience for graduate students. Agency placement is based on student goals and professional leadership background.

SPTS 289A. Advanced Practicum: Sport Management. 4 Units.

This course is designed to provide students with a practical experience in the application of administrative theory. Prerequisite: SPTS 169 or SPTS 269.

SPTS 289B. Advanced Practicum: Coaching. 2-4 Units.

This practicum offers non-classroom experiences in activities related to Sports Medicine, under conditions determined by the appropriate faculty member. SPTS 189 represents advanced practicum work that involves increased independence and responsibility. Enrollment is limited to six units maximum of 089/189A, B, C, D offerings and no category within a course may be repeated for credit.

SPTS 291. Independent Study. 1-4 Unit.

SPTS 297. Independent Research. 1-4 Unit.

SPTS 299. Thesis. 4 Units.

Communication Skills

1. Prepare and deliver presentations effectively.
2. Write clearly, critically and persuasively.

Leadership and Collaboration

1. Work and collaborate in groups toward a common goal.

Critical and Creative Thinking

1. Read, select and interpret important information from sport sciences literature.
2. Design and conduct research studies using appropriate methodologies.

Ethical Reasoning

1. Identify and apply ethical standards to the design and execution of research studies.

Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences Faculty

Pete Schroeder, Associate Professor & Chair, 2007, BS Truman State University, 1996; MA University of the Pacific, 1998; Ed.D. University of Missouri, 2003.

Jolene Baker, 2007, BA Whitworth College, 1997; MA San Diego State University, 2002; Ed.D. University of the Pacific, 2012

Margaret E. Ciccolella, Professor, 1985, BS, University of Colorado, 1970; MS, Brigham Young University, 1972; EdD 1978; JD, Humphreys College of Law, 1993.

Lara Killick, Assistant Professor, 2009, BA, Durham University, England, 2000; MA, University of Leicester, England, 2005; PhD, Loughborough University England, 2009.

Darrin Kitchen, Assistant Professor, 2005, BA, California State University, Chico, 1996; MS, California State University, Sacramento, 1997; EdD, University of the Pacific, 2006.

Linda Koehler, Associate Professor, 1989, BA, Purdue University, 1971; MS, University of New Mexico, 1975; PhD, University of Illinois, 1982.

Brian Moore, Assistant Professor, 2011, BS Loyola Marymount University, 1998; M.Ed. University of Virginia, 2000; Ph.D. University of California-Davis, 2012

Mark Van Ness, Associate Professor, 1999, BS, Wheaton College, 1990; MS, California State University, Sacramento, 1993; PhD, Florida State University, 1997.

Christopher Snell, Professor, 1990, BA, Bedford College, England, 1987; MS, University of Oregon, 1990; PhD, 1993.