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This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.pacific.edu.

Eberhardt School of Business

http://www.business.pacific.edu
Phone: (209) 946-2476
Location: Weber Hall

Lewis R. Gale, Dean
Cynthia F. Eakin, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs

Programs Offered

Master in Business Administration (MBA)
JD/MBA
PharmD/MBA
Peace Corps MBA

Mission

The Eberhardt School of Business develops knowledgeable, innovative business leaders in a personalized, experience-based learning environment and produces scholarship that contributes to disciplinary knowledge, informs teaching, and advances the practice of business.

We share a set of underlying principles that govern our behaviors and our ability to achieve our mission. These include:

  • Maintaining a student-centered learning environment;
  • Educating the whole person;
  • Stimulating intellectual growth;
  • Maintaining a mutually supportive community of faculty, staff and students;
  • Engaging external stakeholders;
  • Promoting excellence;
  • Being socially responsible;
  • Behaving ethically and with integrity;
  • Providing service to the university, community and profession.

Degree programs offered by the Eberhardt School of Business are designed to fulfill this mission and to provide the educational breadth and depth tomorrow’s leaders will need.

Learning Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes

The goals of the Eberhardt School of Business graduate programs are to produce graduate students who possess business knowledge and skills, who are able to apply their knowledge and skills in a global business setting, who are able to work as part of a team, and who are able to communicate effectively.

The specific objectives and outcomes are:

  1. Demonstrate business knowledge and skills
    1. For each business discipline, each student demonstrates knowledge of business principles, concepts, theories, and perspectives.
    2. For each business discipline, each student is skilled in the use of business procedures, methods, strategies, and approaches.
    3. Each student demonstrates an understanding of the interrelationships among business disciplines.

      The business disciplines include accounting, finance, organizational behavior, marketing, operations management, managerial economics, information systems, quantitative analysis, and strategy development and implementation.
  2. Apply business knowledge and skills

    Each student can apply knowledge and skills to business situations and problems in domestic and international settings. This includes:

    1. Strategic thinking. Each student can analyze business environments and opportunities, and to align business activities in developing and implementing organizational strategy and change in complex and uncertain conditions.
    2. Critical thinking. Each student can identify problems, define objectives, gather and analyze information, evaluate risks and alternatives, and make decisions that are ethical and socially responsible and incorporate cultural perspectives.
  3. Demonstrate effective teamwork skills

    Each student can work effectively with others as a colleague and as a manager. This includes:

    1. Teamwork. Each student is able to work in a team and collaborate effectively with others.
    2. Group and organization effectiveness. Each student is able to manage, influence, and lead others.
  4. Communicate clear ideas and plans
    1. Each student demonstrates effective oral communication skills.
    2. Each student demonstrates effective written communication skills.

Master of Business Administration

Admission Requirements

  • Admission to the Eberhardt School of Business MBA Program is competitive and based on criteria which indicate a high promise of success. Performance in prior coursework and standardized test scores are strong considerations in the admission decision.
  • A U.S. bachelor’s degree or its equivalent is required for admission. The MBA Admissions Committee gives equal consideration to all undergraduate majors in the admissions process.
  • MBA admission decisions are made on a rolling basis. Applicants are notified immediately when decisions have been made.
  • The completed application packet must be submitted before the Admissions Committee can render a final decision. The required materials include:
  • The completed application form and supporting materials.
  • Transcripts from all undergraduate, graduate and professional schools attended.
  • Two letters of recommendation written by people knowledgeable of the applicant’s qualifications for graduate work.
  • A score on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). For GMAT information and materials go to www.mba.com . These scores must be less than five years old.
  • Applicants are encouraged to prepare for the GMAT by obtaining review material and sample questions published specifically for this purpose.

Eberhardt 16-Month MBA Program

The Eberhardt School of Business MBA Program is designed to train the managers of the 21st century. The rigorous and intellectually challenging coursework goes beyond the traditional business school curriculum to emphasize important managerial skills like leadership, innovation, communication and a global perspective.

Program Requirements

Program Prerequisites

All students are required to complete prerequisite courses in subjects necessary for success in MBA coursework prior to beginning the MBA. The required prerequisites are three semester units of basic Macroeconomics, three units of basic Microeconomics, three units of Probability and Statistics, and three units of College level Finite Math/Calculus. Three semester units of Managerial Economics may be taken in lieu of the six units of basic economics. Prerequisite courses may be taken at either the undergraduate or graduate level.

Internship Program

All students are required to participate in an internship during the MBA program.

Applied Research/Consulting Projects

All students participate in field projects throughout their MBA courses. Students who desire additional field experience may apply for additional internships or consulting projects.

International Experience

Because international competency is an essential element of success in today’s global economy, all Eberhardt School of Business MBA students participate in an international business experience through the Global Business Competition course (). This course requires overseas travel of approximately two-weeks. has been conducted locations such as Turkey, Panama, Costa Rica, Chile, Finland, Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore, France, Spain, Taiwan, England and Ireland. Students are responsible for all travel costs including airfare, lodging, ground transportation, meals, and other program costs.

Curriculum

The MBA curriculum has a global orientation and is designed around an intensive phase of foundation courses and an advanced phase of integrated management studies. It offers a carefully designed combination of rigorous classroom work, intensive case-based discussions, and off-campus experiences. Students progress through the program as part of a cohort.

Master of Business Administration

Students must complete a minimum of 53 units with a Pacific cumulative grade point average of 3.0 to earn the master of business administration degree.

First Fall Semester
BUSI 211Applied Business Principles18
Spring Semester
BUSI 220Corporate Finance3
BUSI 276Entrepreneurial Management3
BUSI 265Global Marketing Strategy3
BUSI 274Managing Quality/Productivity3
Plus One Elective Course *3
First Summer Session
BUSI 268Global Business Competition3
Second Fall Semester
BUSI 213Corporate Social Responsibility2
BUSI 214Negotiation2
BUSI 279Leadership2
BUSI 280Strategy Implementation2
Plus Three Elective Courses *9
Total Hours53

 

Electives

The 16-month MBA includes electives in Finance, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Sport Management, and Healthcare Management.

Finance Electives
BUSI 221Entrepreneurial Finance3
BUSI 222Student Investment Fund3
BUSI 223Investment Management3
BUSI 226Financial Statement Analysis3
BUSI 263International Finance3
Marketing Electives
BUSI 241Marketing Research3
BUSI 246Marketing of Services3
BUSI 247Consumer Behavior3
BUSI 293: Special Topics1-4
Entrepreneurship Electives
BUSI 221Entrepreneurial Finance3
BUSI 272Entrepreneurship3
BUSI 275Technology and Innovation3
BUSI 293: Special Topics1-4
Healthcare Management Electives
BUSI 250Health Finance: Health Insurance3
BUSI 251International Healthcare Systems3
BUSI 252Healthcare Law3
BUSI 254Health Economics4
BUSI 293: Special Topics1-4
Sport Management Electives
SPTS 265Advanced Sports Law4
SPTS 269Advanced Management of Sport Enterprises4
SPTS 274Advanced Sport Marketing and Promotions4
SPTS 275Advanced Sport Management4
SPTS 287AAdvanced Internship: Sport Management4

 

Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Business Administration Joint Degree

PharmD/MBA: This joint-degree program allows students interested in management positions in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and healthcare industries to develop the needed expertise. Both degrees can be completed in four years, regardless of academic background. Students interested in this program must apply and be accepted by both the MBA and Doctor of Pharmacy programs separately. Please see MBA application for special instructions.

The Eberhardt School of Business PharmD/MBA is modeled after the 16-month MBA. Students spend one year as a member of a full-time MBA cohort before beginning their pharmacy studies. Students then return to the Eberhardt School of Business MBA program in the fall of their third year for a two-unit capstone MBA course.

Students must complete a minimum of 51 units with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in order to earn the PharmD/MBA degrees.

First Year Fall Semester
BUSI 255Applied Business Principles for Pharmacy15
BUSI 254Health Economics4
First Year Spring Semester
BUSI 250Health Finance: Health Insurance3
BUSI 276Entrepreneurial Management3
BUSI 265Global Marketing Strategy3
BUSI 274Managing Quality/Productivity3
MBA Electives6
First Year Summer Session
BUSI 268Global Business Competition3
Second Year Fall, Winter, and Spring
Pharmacy Curriculum *1
Third Year Fall Semester
BUSI 280Strategy Implementation2
Pharmacy Curriculum
Third Year Winter and Spring Semester
Pharmacy Curriculum *2
Fourth Year Fall, Winter and Spring Semester
Pharmacy Curriculum *6
Total Hours51

*

Nine units of MBA credit is awarded for the following pharmacy (PHRM) courses:

PHRM 111 Pharmacy Practice and Professionalism
PHRM 152 Pharmacy Law and Ethics
PHRM 161 Pharmacy Management
PHRM 173 Hospital Pharmacy APPE
PHRM 174 Community Pharmacy APPE

 

Juris Doctorate/Master of Business Administration Joint Degree

Joint-degree JD/MBA Program: The joint-degree JD/MBA Program allows students to complete their three-year law degree at Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law and the 16-month Eberhardt MBA Program together in only four years. To combine the two programs, students can count up to 24 units of course credit toward both degrees. Students interested in the joint-degree JD/MBA Program must apply and be accepted by both the MBA Program and the Law Program separately.

Contact the MBA program for a sample Plan of Study.

Master of Business Administration Peace Corps International Program

Peace Corps Masters International MBA Program: Masters Internationalist students complete a portion of their studies on campus prior to entering the Peace Corps. Students then leave for a Peace Corps assignment that includes language, technical and cross-cultural training. After completing a Peace Corps assignment, students return to campus for a semester to complete their degree. All returned Peace Corps volunteers receive a stipend from the Peace Corps for their volunteer service. Students interested in the Masters International Program must apply and be accepted by both the MBA Program and the Peace Corps separately.

Contact the MBA Program Office for a sample plan of study.

Business Administration Courses

BUSI 100. Management Information Systems. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the concepts and skills needed to utilize information systems resources. The course focuses on the role of information systems in management function with an emphasis on end-user computing, that includes the role of users in information system planning and design. Topics include information systems technology, applications and development. Students gain experience with spreadsheet, data base and network applications. Prerequisite: COMP 025 or COMP 051.

BUSI 104. Operations Management. 4 Units.

Students analyze the production and operations systems in the organization and application of quantitative methods in solution of production and operations problems. A major emphasis is on managerial and economic implications. Prerequisites: BUSI 031, 033; ECON 053, 055; MATH 037, 045 and an acceptable computer course. Junior standing.

BUSI 105. Financial Management. 4 Units.

This course introduces financial instruments and institutions from the perspective of the financial management of the firm. Tools of financial analysis and planning as well as principles of sehor-term and long-term financing are developed as they relate to profit-ability and liquidity. Prerequisites: BUSI 031; ECON 053, 055; MATH 037, 045. Junior standing.

BUSI 107. Marketing Management. 4 Units.

BUSI 107 is an introduction to the institutions, techniques, policies and procedures utilized in the planning and performance of the activities which direct the flow of goods from producers to consumers. An emphasis is placed on the managerial process of decision-making in the setting of marketing strategy. Prerequisite: ECON 053. Junior standing.

BUSI 109. Management and Organizational Behavior. 4 Units.

BUSI 109 applies the concepts of organizational behavior and structure theories to the managerial processes, and emphasizes how organizational efficiency and effectiveness are developed. Junior standing.

BUSI 110. Career and Development Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to enable business students to clearly define their career objectives and available opportunities. Through the course business students understand the connection between internships and full-time careers, are trained in the methods of conducting a successful job search and prepare for on-going career development. Topics include career assessment, resumes and related correspondence, interviewing, career planning, and job search resources. The course also discusses opportunities available in graduate studies. Junior standing.

BUSI 111. Accounting Information Systems. 4 Units.

The course emphasizes the use of accounting software and the interaction of accountants with information systems. It also covers assessment of internal and computer controls in order to identify key risks within accounting cycles, and it reviews the latest computer architectures used in ERP. Prerequisites: BUSI 033 and BUSI 100. Junior standing.

BUSI 113A. Intermediate Accounting I. 4 Units.

Students study the income measurement and asset valuation under generally accepted accounting principles. The course emphasizes current procedures, form and content of financial statements and critical evaluation of alternative accounting practices. Prerequisite: BUSI 031 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 113B. Intermediate Accounting II. 4 Units.

Students continue to study generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include owners' equity, dilutive securities, pensions, leases, income taxes, statement of cash flows and inflation accounting. Prerequisite: BUSI 113A with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 113C. Advanced Accounting. 4 Units.

Students study advanced accounting theory and practice that includes accounting for inter-corperate investments, partnerships, foreign currency transactions, government and nonprofit organizations and current topics. Prerequisite: BUSI 113B with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 115. Tax Accounting. 4 Units.

Students study federal tax laws and doctrines that significantly affect businesses, property transactions, and individuals. Tax planning techniques and tax research skills are emphasized. Prerequisites: BUSI 031 and BUSI 033 both with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 117. Cost Accounting. 4 Units.

This course emphasizes skills used by management accountants or other decision makers within an organization for planning and control. Topics include analysis of cost structures, profit planning, product cost systems, cost estimation, budgeting, and the behavioral implications of management accounting systems. Prerequisites: BUSI 031 and BUSI 033 both with a "C" or better; MATH 037. Junior standing.

BUSI 119. Auditing. 4 Units.

This capstone course in accounting studies the integration of financial and management accounting systems. Topics include the attest function and ethics, generally accepted auditing standards, systems of internal control, evidence and audit reports. Prerequisite: BUSI 113A with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 121. Financial Markets. 4 Units.

Students examine the monetary transmission mechanism with emphasis on its implications for financial management of the individual firm. Topics include the institutions of money and credit creation, the flow-of-funds accounts and financial market subsection interconnection. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 122. Student Investment Fund (SIF). 4 Units.

Operated entirely by students, this course allows students to gain hands-on, real world experience in managing an investment fund with substantial market value. Students perform sector analyses as well as financial analyses of a wide array of securities. As a group they determine the fund's sector allocation and stock/bond/cash allocation. SIF, while maintaining a well-diversified profile, strives to outperform the market (S&P 500). Prerequisites: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better and permission of instructor. Junior standing. May be taken twice for credit.

BUSI 123. Investment Analysis. 4 Units.

Students examine the nature of securities markets and the characteristics of various types of securities for institutional and personal investment. Sources of investment information, security valuation and investment planning are introduced. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 124. Entrepreneurial Finance. 4 Units.

Entrepreneurial Finance discusses the financial issues facing a business start-up and those of a growing enterprise. Specific attention is paid to the acquisition of financing for new ventures, financial management of new and growing businesses, and the harvest of the entrepreneurial venture. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 125. Intermediate Financial Management. 4 Units.

This is a second course in business finance with emphasis on problem solving. Selected problems in the management of long-term and short-term assets are examined in depth and techniques for optimizing the goals of the firm are developed. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 126. Topics in Finance. 4 Units.

This course is an in-depth examination of special topics of current interest in the field of finance. Students and faculty together explore empirical and theoretical issues in such areas of finance as investment analysis, financial management, financial markets and other related areas. Prerequisites: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better and BUSI 121. Junior standing.

BUSI 127. Legal Aspects of Real Estate. 4 Units.

Students study the legal aspects that concern real estate and real estate transactions. Topics include deeds, listing agreements, title insurance, real estate contracts, closing, property taxation, land use regulations and landlord-tenent relationships. Prerequisite: BUSI 053. Junior standing.

BUSI 134. Conflict Management. 4 Units.

Conflict is inevitable in organizational, inter-organizational and international settings. This course deals with conflict in concept and in practice and is designed to provide insights into its causes and its productive and destructive consequences. It also focuses on providing tools for managing conflict productively, and particularly emphasizes negotiation. Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 136. Business Programming. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to programming logic and design. Visual Basic is used to emphasize the development of business applications. Students also study Windows design elements, forms, and events. Junior standing.

BUSI 137. Database Management Systems. 4 Units.

Students learn to develop database management systems to design and build business applications. The course teaches database design (normalization), queries (SQL), development of business applications that use forms and reports, and an introduction to database administration. Prerequisite: BUSI 100 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 138. Networking and Telecommunications Management. 4 Units.

Students examine design, implementation, and management of local area networks. Studies include design issues in wide area networks and telecommunications with emphasis on Internet connectivity in addition to network server setup and administration that includes Web site administration. Prerequisite: BUSI 100 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 139. Electronic Commerce Project. 4 Units.

Students design and build applications for electronic commerce. Students use databases and programming to build interactive Web sites. Prerequisite: BUSI 100 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 140. Business Systems Analysis. 4 Units.

Students study systems development life cycle, methods and tools for systems analysis and design, human factors, user interface, and systems integration issues. Prerequisite: BUSI 136. Junior standing.

BUSI 141. Marketing Research. 4 Units.

Students study the concepts and techniques useful in the solution of marketing problems and in the identification of marketing opportunities. This course emphasizes the design of information acquisition and the evaluation and interpretation of research findings. Prerequisites: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better and MATH 037. Junior standing.

BUSI 143. Product Innovation. 4 Units.

Maintaining competitiveness in the contemporary marketplace requires that companies focus increasingly on the management of product and service innovation. This course addresses the innovation process-technology-based and otherwise-from the identification of new ideas through the development of innovations and eventual introduction of novel products to consumers. Topics include sources of innovation, identification and screening of product innovations, business planning for new products, technological forecasting, integrating innovation with business objectives and organizational models for fostering innovation. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 147. Consumer Behavior. 4 Units.

Students study the bases for consumer behavior, which include relevant information from social psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology. Topics include the application of analysis of consumers' behavior and attitudes to marketing management decisions. Management decision areas that are discussed include advertising, product development, marketing research and pricing. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 148. Promotions Management. 4 Units.

Students study the theory and practices used in the promotions component of the marketing mix. Students are exposed to a number of techniques employed by marketing departments, advertising firms and public relations professionals to advertise and promote products and or services. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 149. Strategic Marketing. 4 Units.

Students are introduced to the strategic marketing process, that includes the analysis of marketing situations, identification of problems, determination of solutions, implementation of corrective action, and planning strategy. Prerequisites: BUSI 105 and BUSI 107 both with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 153. Entertainment Law. 4 Units.

Students study all aspects of the legal relationships and rights problems in films, television, music and records. This course is also offered as MMGT 153. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 157. Commercial Law. 4 Units.

Students study the basic principles of commercial and trade law and business organizations that include agency partnerships and corporations. The course covers contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code, real and personal property, securities regulation, secured transactions, bankruptcy, professional liability and negotiable instruments. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 159. Employment Law. 4 Units.

This course examines major labor-management relations legislation and its interpretation and treatment by administrative agencies and the courts. Primary emphasis is on the National Labor Relations Act as amended, but attention is also given to law concerning public sector labor relations, employment discrimination and other related law. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 163. International Financial Management. 4 Units.

This course is an analysis of management problems that arise in an international financial environment. Specific consideration is given to financial risk (s), management and international financial markets. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 165. International Marketing. 4 Units.

Students examine the environment for marketing across borders. The course covers marketing practice, policies and strategies in the multinational setting. Students complete a global screening of countries and draw up a marketing plan and strategy for a given product. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 169. International Management. 4 Units.

Develops cross-cultural awareness through understanding of social, political, economical, and historical influences on managerial practice. Methods include lectures, readings, videos, role-plays, and reports (written and oral). Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 170. Human Resources Management. 4 Units.

This course introduces the P/HR management area with its core of activities that include job analysis, performance evaluation, employee acquisition, employee and management development, and compensation and benefits. The influences of the equal employment and civil rights laws, wage, and hour laws, labor law and labor unions in organizational operations are studied. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 172. Entrepreneurship. 4 Units.

This course covers the new creation process from the venture idea phase to the capital search and acquisition, through the new venture start-up and operations. Theories and techniques are applied to the planning and development of an actual new enterprise. New ventures include the traditional small business or a high growth venture, or the formation of a new business entity or a new venture within an existing organization. Prerequisites: BUSI 031, 033, 107 all with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 174. Work Group Dynamics. 4 Units.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with an understanding of group dynamics that enable them to develop skills to participate in and lead groups in the workplace. Because the focus is on groups, the course takes a "learning by doing" approach and involves numerous group activities designed to reinforce the material. Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 175. Leadership and Change. 4 Units.

Students examine the processes of deliberate organizational change as adaptations to both internal and external developments. The course covers criteria for effective change programs, strategic variables that affect change (e.g., power, communication, conflict), and technologies that produce change (e.g., consulting, training, research). Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 176. Managing Small Businesses. 4 Units.

The focus of the course is on the decisions owner-managers make in choosing opportunities, allocating resourses, motivating employees and maintaining control while not stifling entrepreneurial activities that cause a business to grow. Topics include managing under adversity, management of the family business, professionalizing the growing business, corporate entrepreneurship, financial planning, control, accountability and the changing role of the board of directors. A field study and a research paper that involves the applications of the concepts in a specific firm are required. Prerequisites: BUSI 031 and BUSI 109 both with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 177. International Trade Law. 4 Units.

International Trade Law provides students with the opportunity to study legal aspects associated with international trade agreements. The primary emphasis of the course is on the global trading system as represented by the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and the World Trade Organization and regional trading systems such as the European Union and the North American Free Trade Agreement. The course also examines agreements ancillary to these trading regimes as well as relevant national laws. The emphasis of the course will be on the recognition of legal problems and the discovery and application of appropriate principles of international and domestic law that may assist in resolving these problems. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 178. International Commercial Law. 4 Units.

International Commercial Law provides students with the opportunity to study the law that governs international contracts. The course examines ethical considerations in international contracting, commercial dispute resolutions, and import and export transactions. Several different types of contracts are examined including those that relate to the sale of goods, services, transportation, insurance and intellectual property rights. The emphasis of the course is on the recognition of legal problems and the discovery and application of appropriate principles of international and domestic law that may assist in resolving these problems. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 181. Strategic Management and Policy. 4 Units.

This course is an integrated analysis of the major functional areas of an enterprise, viewed primarily from the upper levels of management. The strategic management process provides the framework that formulates and implements objectives, policies and programs through which a company gains sustainable competencies and competitive advantage in the marketplace. Students participate in computer simulations, case analysis, and experimental exercises in order to develop skills in executive teamwork, to solve strategic problems and to present and defend recommendations. Prerequisites: BUSI 031, 033, 053, 100, 104, 105, 107, 109.

BUSI 183. Administrative Internship. 1-8 Unit.

The internship affords students the opportunity to combine administrative practice and classroom theory. Interns are placed with private, public or third sector agencies for a period of at least 40 hours per earned credit hour. In addition, the supervising instructor assigns academic work to complement the hands-on portion of the internship. Interested students contact the ESB Career Services Office or the office of the Associate Dean located in Weber Hall.

BUSI 186. Firm, Markets, and Environment: Theory and Application. 3 Units.

This course provides in-depth exposure to both the theory of the firm and a set of quantitative techniques that managers need to utilize in order to facilitate decision making and problem solving. The topics include demand theory and estimation, forecasting with econometric and time-series techniques, production and cost theory, theory of markets, capital budgeting, fiscal and monetary policy, and the global economic and financial environment. Prerequisites: ECON 053, 055, and permission of the MBA Program Director. Senior standing.

BUSI 188. Data and Decisions. 3 Units.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and techniques that analyze risk and formulate sound decisions in uncertain environments. The course examines statistical methods which interpret and analyze data that include sampling concepts, regression analysis, and hypothesis testing. Applications include investor management, portfolio analysis, quality control and inventory management, portfolio analysis, quality control and inventory management. This course emphasizes analytical techniques that are broadly applicable to business problems. Prerequisites: MATH 037, 045 and permission of the MBA Program Director. Senior standing.

BUSI 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Unit.

This course is primarily for advanced majors in business administration. An independent study proposal is submitted to and is approved by the student's faculty adviser, the instructor and the ESB Academic Standards Committee. Independent study is self-directed study by the student.

BUSI 210. Business and Public Policy. 3 Units.

This course is about the public policy process and the role business plays in it. It examines national, regional and international policy issues of relevance to business and the larger society. It also involves an examination of the ethical dimensions of business decision-making. Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I of MBA Program or the permission of instructor and the MBA Director.

BUSI 211. Applied Business Principles. 18 Units.

This course is an applied and intensive overview of business administration. Topics include eight academic modules covering accounting, finance, marketing, information systems, data analysis and decision making, organizational behavior, managerial economics. In addition, there is one pass/no credit module on career development. The course concludes with a business competition between teams that consists of students in the course. The course is team taught by numerous members of the faculty in the Eberhardt School of Business. The minimum passing grade for this course is a B. This course is the required of all students in the MBA program and is a Prerequisite for all other courses offered in the MBA program. Prerequisites: Admission into the MBA Program, ECON 053 and ECON 055; MATH 037 and MATH 045 or equivalent courses.

BUSI 212. MBA Career Development Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to enable business students to clearly define their career objectives and available opportunities as it relates to the Pacific MBA. Through the course, MBA students are trained in the tactics and methods to conduct a successful job search and to prepare for multiple career transitions over the course of their entire business career. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the MBA Program.

BUSI 213. Corporate Social Responsibility. 2 Units.

The purpose of this course is to improve your abilities as a manager to anticipate, analyze, respond to and manage issues of social responsibility and ethics that are faced in careers. Students have an opportunity to consider challenges that arise across different business functions in both domestic and global markets. Sample topics may include compliance with a variety of laws, fair and unfair competition, responsibility to customers, shareholders, employees and the environment, insider trading, product safety and more. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better. Graduate students from other programs may enroll with permission of the Associate Dean in the Eberhardt School.

BUSI 214. Negotiation. 2 Units.

The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiation as it is practiced in a variety of settings. This course is designed to be relevant to the broad spectrum of negotiations problems that are faced by managers and individuals. Thus, the content is relevant to students interested in marketing, entrepreneurship, consulting relationships, international management or mergers and acquisitions. In addition, the course emphasizes negotiations that occur in the daily life of the manager. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 220. Corporate Finance. 3 Units.

This advanced course in financial management introduces a set of analytical tools needed to make sound corporate decisions in such areas as capital budgeting, capital structure and dividend policy. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 221. Entrepreneurial Finance. 3 Units.

Students analyze in-depth the financial issues that face a business start-up. Specific attention is paid to the acquisition of financing for new ventures and the financial management of new and growing businesses. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 222. Student Investment Fund. 3 Units.

Student Investment Fund (SIF) is operated entirely by students, and it allows them to gain hands-on, real world experience in managing an investment fund with substantial market value. Students perform sector analyses as well as financial analyses of a wide array of securities, and as a group have to determine the fund's sector allocation and stock/bond/cash allocation. SIF, while maintaining a well-diversified portfolio, strives to outperform the market (S&P 500). Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better and permission of instructor.

BUSI 223. Investment Management. 3 Units.

This course teaches students a set of analytical tools necessary to evaluate the profitability of a vast array of financial assets such as stocks, bonds, options and financial futures. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 225. Investments/Portfolio Analysis. 3 Units.

BUSI 226. Financial Statement Analysis. 3 Units.

This course familiarizes students with the types of financial statements and analysis processes used by bankers and analysts. This course also provides students with a basic understanding of the many issues bankers and analysts face in understanding a company through its financial statements. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better or permission of Associate Dean.

BUSI 230. Enterprise Systems Analysis. 3 Units.

An Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system is a tool that integrates data across a business organization. This class uses a sample system to examine the features, capabilities, and business advantages of ERP systems. The class investigates the roles of the individual modules and the importance of the integration. It also discusses the strategic implications of vendor and customer interactions through ERP systems. Various issues of implementation and customization are covered. By its nature, the study for ERP systems ties together knowledge from a variety of business disciplines. Prerequisite: BUSI 200 with a "C" or better or BUSI 211 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 231. Database Management. 3 Units.

Students learn to design and develop large-scale business applications that use database management systems. The course emphasizes teamwork, team management, and joint application development tools. It uses large-scale commercial database tools such as Oracle and SQL Server. Prerequisite: BUSI 200 with a "C" or better or BUSI 211 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 236. Business Programming. 3 Units.

This business course introduces students to program logic and design. Visual Basic is used in the development of various business applications in the context of Windows design elements, forms, and events. Prerequisite: BUSI 200 with a "C" or better or BUSI 211 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 238. Computer Networking and Telecommunications Management. 3 Units.

Students study modern networks and telecommunications systems, that include wireless and mobile applications, and Web-based systems. The course develops the skills to manage business telecommunication and network infrastructures. It equips managers with the foundations of the technical, economic, and political structure of modern communication systems. The course emphasizes design and management of large-scale enterprise networks. Prerequisite: BUSI 200 with a "C" or better or BUSI 211 with a "B" or better or equivalent.

BUSI 239. MIS Project. 3 Units.

Students define and create a MIS e-business application, that uses a DBMS and the Internet. Projects are team-oriented and encompass MIS concepts from database, usability, and the Internet. Students use project management and workgroup software to set schedules and maintain communication. Discussions emphasize the challenges and potential solutions for dealing with large-scale projects. Prerequisites: BUSI 211 with a "B" or better and 231 with a "C" or better. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: BUSI 230 with a "C" or better or permission of instructor and MBA director.

BUSI 241. Marketing Research. 3 Units.

Students study the concepts and techniques useful in the solution of marketing problems and in the identification of marketing opportunities. Emphasis is given to the design of information acquisition and to the evaluation and interpretation of research findings. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 245. Customer Relationship Management. 3 Units.

This course explores the process of understanding, creating and delivering value to targeted business markets and individual customers. It relies upon assessment of value in the marketplace, and it provides a means of gaining an equitable return on value delivered and enhancing a supplier firm's present and future profitability. It also provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform consumer analyses that can be used to understand markets and to develop effective marketing strategies. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 246. Marketing of Services. 3 Units.

This class explores the theory and strategies that drive service consumption. Students are exposed to the unique characteristics of marketing services that include the importance of the physical environment to service encounter success, the creation of customer satisfaction, the delivery of service quality and value, and the development of strategies to overcome service failure. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 247. Consumer Behavior. 3 Units.

This interdisciplinary course discusses the customer as the focus of the marketing system. Knowledge about the customer behavior, obtained through the application of a series of analytic frameworks and tools, is presented as the basis for marketing decisions at both the strategic and tactical levels. Central focus of the course is the analysis of customer decision-making processes and an understanding of the customer activity cycle or consumption chain. Methods to build customer satisfaction and loyalty through relationship marketing are stressed. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 249. Strategic Marketing. 3 Units.

This course develops students' decision-making skills in the complex and fast changing international marketplace. The course provides an integrated analysis of the marketing functions of a firm, viewed primarily from the upper level of management. Emphasis is placed on formulation of goals and objectives and selection of strategies under conditions of uncertainty as they relate to the pricing, distribution and promotion of new and existing products, to achieve corporate objectives in today's global environment. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 250. Health Finance: Health Insurance. 3 Units.

Students examine the theory and practice of health insurance in the United States. Students who complete this course understand the history and institutional framework of health insurance, understand how health insurance operates, and are able to assess the efficiency and equity of healthcare finance. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 251. International Healthcare Systems. 3 Units.

This course is an international overview of healthcare finance and delivery that familiarizes students with healthcare finance and delivery around the world. Students develop critical analytical skills to enable them to compare and contrast health systems, identify relative strengths and weaknesses, and assess the possibilities for structural reform of the U.S. healthcare system. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 252. Healthcare Law. 3 Units.

Students analyze and learn the application of statutes, regulations, case law and policies that affect the health care system in the U.S. Upon completion of this course students understand the roles of the legal, legislative and administrative systems in health care, are able to discuss critically important legal, ethical and policy issues in health care, and are able to recognize situations that may occur in health systems management that require consultation with legal counsel. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 254. Health Economics. 4 Units.

This course applies the tools of microeconomics to the study of health care. It provides an analysis of how decisions are made by health care providers, consumers, and third parties responsible for payment (e.g. health insurers). The course is built around the individual's demand for health care and the supply of services by doctors and hospitals. Topics covered include health insurance, managed care and industry competitions, the pharmaceutical industry, the role of the government as a provider of care, long-term care, international health comparisons, and cost-benefit analysis/cost-effectiveness analysis. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 with a "B" or better or concurrent with BUSI 255.

BUSI 255. Applied Business Principles for Pharmacy. 15 Units.

This course is an applied and intensive overview of business administration. Topics include seven academic modules covering information systems, data analysis and decision making, accounting, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, and strategy formulation. The course concludes with a competition between teams consisting of students in the course. The course is team taught by faculty in the Eberhardt School of Business, each in their own area of specialization. This course is the required beginning course for all students in the PharmD/MBA program. Students must earn a B or better in the course to continue in the MBA program. In addition, the overall grade cannot include a grade of D or F in any module, and cannot include more than two grades of C or C-. Prerequisite: Admission into the PharmD/MBA program.

BUSI 263. International Finance. 3 Units.

This course provides students with a conceptual framework for analyzing key financial decisions faced by multinational corporations. The major focus of this class is on spot exchange markets, forward exchange markets, the balance of payments, exchange rate determinations, hedging strategies, financing alternatives, transfers of international payments, and international bonds and equites investment and diversification. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 265. Global Marketing Strategy. 3 Units.

This course develops students' decision-making skills in the complex and fast changing international marketplace. Emphasis is placed on the frameworks and techniques used to decide which countries offer potential markets for products, how and to what degree the components of the marketing mix must be customized to an international market, and which strategies are best suited to entering a country. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 267. International Business Law. 3 Units.

Students are introduced to the legal environment of international business. The course provides students with the opportunity to study international sales and commercial transactions. Additionally, students have the opportunity to become familiar with international and domestic laws that directly affect global trade. Finally, students have the opportunity to become familiar with laws and events that indirectly affect international trade such as environmental standards, privatization and intellectual property protection. The emphasis of the course is on the recognition of legal problems and the discovery and application of appropriate principles of international and domestic laws that may assist to resolve these problems. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 268. Global Business Competition. 3 Units.

Today, all levels of business operations are becoming global. Business people must consider additional parameters when they enter the global sphere. The rules of the game such as laws, customs, theories, and business practices may be different. This course works on business problems and strategies within the global environment in which U.S. businesses compete. The key objective of this course is to analyze the operation of global firms, to analyze various types of entry strategies into foreign countries, impacts on host and home countries, and the powerful flexibility of global systems. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better or permission of instructor and the MBA Director.

BUSI 269. Comparative Management. 3 Units.

BUSI 270. Human Resource Management. 3 Units.

This course explores research, theory, and practical applications to administrative problems in human resource management. The course provides students with an understanding and appreciation of: strategic HRM, HRM law, job analysis and design, employee recruitment, selection and placement, training and development, performance evaluation, compensation and benefits, labor relations and collective bargaining, safety and health, international HRM, HRM computer simulation, HR information/management systems and other HRM technological innovations.

BUSI 272. Entrepreneurship. 3 Units.

This course provides an experiential introduction to the creation of a new business enterprise. Building upon mentor experiences, internship and work experiences and the use of selected guest speakers, the course focuses on writing a business plan that could be presented to a venture capitalist (or other source) for funding. Topics include the traits of successful entrepreneurs, generating business opportunities, screening family businesses, management/marketing/financial skills needed, "intrapreneurship," etc. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 274. Managing Quality/Productivity. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to recognize the essence of an organization as its operations, or as its production and service delivery. Topics include the life cycle of operations and supply chain strategies for goods and services, the integration of and information flows between business functions, and the challenges of the globalization of operations and supply chain choices. Students apply analytical methods to develop, deliver, and improve production systems in a "real world" field experience. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 275. Technology and Innovation. 3 Units.

The process of taking science and technology to the marketplace has taken on strategic importance to company leadership in many industries. This course provides students with concepts, frameworks and tools for managing technology and innovation. How can companies identify the major developments in science and technology that affect them directly and indirectly? What avenues are available to maintain technological leadership, and how can they be integrated into a company's overall objectives? What global strategies are available to develop technology and take it to the marketplace? Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 276. Entrepreneurial Management. 3 Units.

This course is designed to integrate the functional knowledge students have acquired in their first semester as an MBA student and to teach them how to apply it within innovative and entrepreneurial business settings that call upon managers to make decisions and plans under conditions of uncertainty. The focus on the entrepreneur and entrepreneurial management reflects two considerations. The first is the growing recognition of the critical importance of entrepreneurial activities in capitalist economics. The second is that it introduces students to a set of opportunities that most of them encounter in their careers. New companies as well as innovative businesses at larger firms often look for businesspeople with the perspective and skills needed to thrive in innovative business environments and the aim is to help prepare students for such opportunities. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better. Graduate students from other programs may enroll with permission of the Associate Dean in the Eberhardt School.

BUSI 277. Small Business Consulting. 3 Units.

This course provides students with a structured opportunity to apply knowledge gained from the classroom to a small business environment. Students work in teams to address operational problems and identify methods of capitalizing on growth opportunities in actual companies.

BUSI 279. Leadership. 2 Units.

This course utilizes the research and practice of recent years that concerns situational leadership and transformational leadership. The class emphasis will be experiential. Emphasis is placed on the consensus building, values alignment and vision building. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 280. Strategy Implementation. 2 Units.

This course addresses the managerial challenge of strategy implementation by examining the organizational elements that must be drawn into line to support a strategy, and by examining the immense difficulties inherent in changing an organization. The aim of the course is to provide participants with a conceptual and practical understanding of the strategic and organizational challenges of multinational corporate management. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 281. Strategic Management. 3 Units.

The vast majority of newly formulated business strategies fail in their implementation. In some cases they end up as faint, half-hearted replicas of the original plans. In other cases they simply never materialize at all. This course uses the case method in a multinational corporate setting to address the managerial challenge of strategy implementation by examining the organizational elements that must be drawn into line to support a strategy, and by examining the immense difficulties involved in changing an organization. Prerequisite: BUSI 211 or BUSI 255 with a "B" or better.

BUSI 282. Entrepreneurial Rapid Growth. 3 Units.

BUSI 283. Administrative Internship. 1-3 Unit.

BUSI 291. Graduate Independent Study. 1-4 Unit.

Eberhardt School of Business Faculty

Lewis R. Gale, Dean and Professor of Business, 2010, BA, California State University, Fresno. 1989; M.S., Arizona State University, 1994. Ph.D., Arizona State University, 1994.

Cynthia Eakin, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs, 1996, BS, Florida State University, 1986; MA, 1988; PhD, 1993.

Ray Sylvester, Associate Dean, Professor, 1972, BA, Gettysburg College, 1962; MBA, University of Michigan, 1963; PhD, 1972.

Thomas E. Brierton, Associate Professor, 1989, BBA, University of Wisconsin, 1978; JD, Northern Illinois University, College of Law, 1983.

Michael L. Canniff, Lecturer, 2003, BA, University of Minnesota, 1985; MS, Syracuse University, 1990.

Joel Herche, Associate Professor, 1994, BA, Central Washington University, 1979; MBA, Golden Gate University, 1986; PhD, University of Oregon, 1989.

Peter E. Hilsenrath, Professor, 2009, BA, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1978; PhD, University of Texas, Austin.

Ronald Hoverstad, Associate Professor, 1990, BA, Augsburg College, 1974; MBA, St. Cloud State University, 1981; PhD, University of Minnesota, 1986.

Hsinchih Huang, Associate Professor, 1998, BS, National Chiao-Tung University (Taiwan), 1986; MBA, Rochester Institute of Technology, 1990; PhD, University of North Texas, 1996.

Sacha M. Joseph, Assistant Professor, 2006, BA, University of the West Indies (Jamaica), 1998; MS, Florida State University, 2004; PhD, Florida State University, 2006.

John R. Knight, Professor, 1995, BA, Tulane University, 1969; MBA, Louisiana State University, 1978; PhD, 1990.

Unro Lee, Professor, 1990, BA, University of Southern California, 1977; MA, Indiana University, 1981; PhD, Purdue University, 1986.

Jeffrey A. Miles, Professor, 1996, BA, Ohio State University, 1984; M.P.S., Cornell University, 1986; MLHR, Ohio State University, 1992; PhD, 1993.

Stefanie E. Naumann, Assistant Professor, 1999, BS, Tulane University, 1993; PhD, Louisiana State, 1998.

Gerald V. Post, Professor, 1999, BA, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 1978; PhD, Iowa State University, 1983.

Williar T. Price, Professor, 1980, BS, University of California, Berkeley, 1961; M.P.W.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1969; PhD, 1973.

Chris Sablynski, Associate Professor, 2009, BS, University of Florida, 1986; MS, San Francisco State University, 1996; PhD, University of Washington, 2002.

Dara M. Szyliowicz, Assistant Professor, 2006, BA, Columbia University, 1988; MA, University of California, Berkeley, 1990; PhD, University of Illinois, 1998.

Eric W. Typpo, Associate Professor, 1998, BS, University of Missouri, 1986; MA, 1990; PhD, Florida State University, 1994.

Richard J. Vargo, Professor, 1981, BS, Marietta College, 1963; MBA, Ohio University, 1965; PhD, University of Washington, 1969.

R. Daniel Wadhwani, Assistant Professor, 2006, BA, Yale University, 1991; PhD, University of Pennsylvania, 2003.

Suzanne B. Walchli, Assistant Professor, 2000, BA, Duke University, 1975; MBA, Wharton Graduate Division, University of Pennsylvania, 1978; PhD, Northwestern University, 1996.

Cynthia K. Wagner Weick, Professor, 1990, BS, Ohio State University, 1979; MS, 1980; PhD, University of Pennsylvania, 1986.

Stephen W. Wheeler, Professor, 1994, BA, California State University, Sacramento, 1976; MS, 1982; PhD, Arizona State University, 1988.

PengCheng Zhu, Assistant Professor of Finance, 2009, BBA, Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade, 2002; MBA, Carleton University, 2004; PhD, Carleton University, 2009.