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Law Programs

http://mcgeorge.edu
Phone: (916) 739-7191
Location: McGeorge School of Law

Michael Hunter Schwartz, Dean

Programs Offered

Doctor of Juridical Science (JSD) with concentrations in:

  • International Water Resources
  • International Legal Studies

Joint Degree 

Juris Doctor (JD) with certificates of concentration in:

  • Business Certificate of Concentration
  • Capital Lawyering Certificate of Concentration
  • Environmental Certificate of Concentration 
  • Health Certificate of Concentration
  • Intellectual Property Certificate of Concentration
  • International Certificate of Concentration
  • Tax Certificate of Concentration 
  • Trial & Appellate Advocacy Certificate of Concentration

Master of Laws (LLM) with concentrations in:

  • Transnational Business Practice
  • U.S. Law & Policy
  • Water Resource Law

Master of Public Administration (MPA) with concentrations in:

  • Water Policy
  • Health Policy
  • Environmental Policy
  • Capital Policy Making
  • Government Operations and Leadership
  • Non-Profit Operations and Leadership
  • Education Policy and Leadership
  • Policy Change, Institutional Reform, Sustainability

Mater of Public Policy (MPP) with concentrations in:

  • Water Policy
  • Health Policy
  • Environmental Policy
  • Capital Policy Making
  • Government Operations and Leadership
  • Non-Profit Operations and Leadership
  • Education Policy and Leadership

Master of Studies in Law (MSL) with focus areas in:

  • Government & Public Policy
  • Health Care
  • Human Resources
  • Water & the Environment 

Mission Statement

(As approved by Faculty on October 27, 2016)

The mission of the McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, is to:

Provide a student-centered education that prepares its graduates for productive, successful, and ethical careers in law and other professions that serve society, and for leadership in building a diverse society committed to global social justice; and

Contribute to the improvement of law and policy through engaged scholarship and other forms of public service.

About McGeorge School of Law

Established nearly 90 years ago, the University of Pacific, McGeorge School of Law is an internationally recognized leader in the field of legal education with alumni practicing in all 50 states and in 58 countries. Its location in the capital city of California, Sacramento, has shaped the school's focus on state and local government law, International law, water law, and advocacy.

McGeorge School of Law began as a one-room night school in downtown Sacramento (L & 10th) in 1924, when it was founded as the Sacramento College of Law. Verne Adrian McGeorge was the founding dean and professor of law.  The first commencement in 1925 marked the graduation of five new attorneys. The first female graduate of the school was Rose Sheehan in 1927, marking the college as ahead of its time in diversity and inclusion. In 1929, the Board of Trustees renamed the school McGeorge College of Law in honor of its founder.

Succeeding McGeorge, Russell Harris was dean from 1930-1933. Gilford Rowland was dean from 1933-1937. Lawrence Dorety was dean from 1937 until the school closed during WWII. The school reopened in 1946 under Dean John Swan.  Dean Swan began to pursue a permanent home for McGeorge College of Law after several moves in downtown Sacramento.

Legacy of Leadership

In 1957, the influential Gordon D. Schaber became dean of McGeorge College of Law after Dean Swan's sudden death. Soon after, the Board of Trustees voted to move the school to a vacant well-baby clinic at the corner of 33rd Street and Fifth Avenue in the Oak Park neighborhood. Today, the McGeorge School of Law campus has grown to 13 acres. The law-school only campus continues to be located in Oak Park, three miles southeast of the state Capitol building in Sacramento, California.

For 34 years, Dean Schaber guided the school through its emergence as a first-class law school. In 1964, Schaber won accreditation by the Committee of Bar Examiners for the state of California. He recruited top-notch faculty, such as Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who taught constitutional law on the Sacramento campus from 1965-1988.

Emergence of McGeorge as a National Law School

McGeorge School of Law was accredited by the American Bar Association in 1968, paving the way for its rise to national prominence. In 1983, McGeorge School of Law became a member school in the Order of the Coif, the ABA's highest acknowledgment of academic excellence; less than half of all law schools accredited by the American Bar Association are also Order of the Coif member schools. 

The ABA bestowed on Schaber its highest honor for service in legal education (The Kutak Award) in 1991, the year he stepped down as dean. Dean Gerald Caplan succeeded Schaber in 1991. During Caplan's tenure, the Governmental Affairs program was established to capitalize on the school's location in Sacramento.  He expanded McGeorge's presence in intercollegiate Mock Trial competitions around the nation.  In 2002, Dean Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker became the eighth dean of McGeorge School of Law.  Parker championed the expansion of student study and faculty exchanges in Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Parker expanded externships and started new clinical programming in specialty areas such as immigration, mediation, and appellate advocacy. She launched strong collaborations with high schools to establish mentoring programs and law-themed curricula.

McGeorge School of Law Today

Michael Hunter Schwartz, former dean and professor of law in the William H. Bowen School of Law, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, became the 10th dean of McGeorge School of Law, in 2017. Each of the past three years, Dean Schwartz has been ranked among the 15 Most Influential People in Legal Education; he was ranked ninth in 2017. The McGeorge School of Law faculty includes full-time and part-time professors who hold law degrees from top law schools in the country, including Harvard, University of Chicago, Stanford, Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, Northwestern University, McGeorge, and Georgetown. McGeorge faculty members have created three national law school textbook series, have published, collectively, more than 100 books, and have published law school textbooks that have been adopted at more than 2/3 of the law schools in the United States.

The McGeorge School of Law Legal Studies Center was opened in 2011 and houses the Gordon D. Schaber Law Library. The state-of-the-art library serves the Sacramento legal community of students, law clerks and members of the Sacramento County bench and bar.

McGeorge School of Law enjoys a number of significant national rankings, including a top-10 ranking for trial advocacy, a top-10 ranking for government law, an A+ ranking for providing practical legal training, a top-20 ranking for International Law, and a top-35 ranking for part-time programs.

McGeorge School of Law has more than 13,000 alumni who practice in all 50 states and in 58 countries. More than 350 McGeorge alumni serve as judges, including two who are judges of the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, the second-highest court in the nation, and two who are state Supreme Court justices in Nebraska and Nevada. 

McGeorge’s unique Focused Decisions arm serves practicing lawyers all over the country providing litigation and jury consulting services, including mock trials and focus groups, trial presentations and technology support, and videography and editing services. 

Affiliation with University of the Pacific

McGeorge merged with University of the Pacific as their school of law in 1966 and began offering day classes the following year. The original evening program for California leaders continues today and is consistently recognized as one of the best part-time law programs in the nation.

Areas of Academic Distinction

McGeorge School of Law offers award-winning programs in moot court and mock trial, having won dozens of competitions, has one of the strongest government law programs in the country, and enjoys a global reputation for its programs in international law and water law. Its master program in Transnational Business Practice counts 500 alumni around the globe, and the law school offers the only LL.M. in water law in the nation. McGeorge also offers the only Masters in Public Policy and Masters in Public Administration degrees in the nation that is housed in a law school. The school offers annual summer programs for J.D. students in Salzburg, Austria, and Antiqua, Guatemala, attracting law students from around the world.

McGeorge's location in Sacramento, California's capital city, is a benefit to students who want to study public law and governmental decision-making. The McGeorge Capital Center prepares students for careers in leadership and service through extensive externship and co-curricular opportunities.

McGeorge has a rigorous core curriculum and also offers students a cutting-edge legal writing program and outstanding legal clinics, including clinics providing legal services in the areas of immigration law, mediation, legislation and public policy, bankruptcy, elder and health law, criminal law, and small business law. Students and supervising attorneys handle hundreds of civil and immigration cases a year through all phases, including trial and appeal; author legislation actually enacted by the California legislature; mediate disputes between prisons and prison inmates, and draft legislation.

Accreditation and Memberships

McGeorge School of Law is fully accredited by the Council of the Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar of the American Bar Association, and by the Committee of Bar Examiners of the State Bar of California. Degrees other than the JD (LLM, MSL, JSD, MPP, and MPA) are offered with the formal acquiescence of the American Bar Association Accreditation Committee. McGeorge School of Law is a member of the Association of American Law Schools. The school is approved for participation in veterans’ educational benefits programs.

The law school has been awarded a chapter of The Order of the Coif, a national law school honorary society founded for the purposes of encouraging legal scholarship and advancing the ethical standards of the legal profession.

Full-Time and Part-Time Divisions

McGeorge School of Law offers programs leading to the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree through a Full-Time Division and a Part-Time Division. The two divisions have the same curriculum, faculty, and methods of instruction; maintain the same scholastic standards and degree requirements; and adhere to the same objectives.

The law school operates on the semester system; two semesters of 14 weeks each plus examination periods. All year-long courses begin in the Fall Semester, which starts in mid-August. The Spring Semester begins in January. Summer Sessions are also offered beginning in May.

The course of study in the Full-Time Division leading to the J.D. degree requires three academic years (six semesters) of full-time study. A Full-Time Division student must enroll and earn credit for a minimum of 12 units each semester; the usual course load is 14 to 16 units per semester. Full-time students are expected to devote substantially all their working time to the study of law and are required to limit outside paid employment to not more than 20 hours per week during the academic year.

The Part-Time Division program offers a reduced course load which generally requires four academic years (eight semesters) plus two summers of part-time study to meet J.D. degree requirements. Course loads usually range from 8 to 10 units each semester, with a minimum of 8 units required per semester. Most Part-Time Division students enroll in Summer Session courses to reach the required 88 units,  but may, schedule permitting, take those units during the academic year instead. An accelerated Evening Division program enables a student to meet degree requirements in three and one-half years (seven academic semesters and Summer Sessions).

First-year required courses and second-year part-time required courses must be taken with the division in which a student is enrolled unless an exception is approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. Electives and upper-division required courses may be taken after the first year during the day or evening hours, as individual schedules permit. Students who wish to change their programs of study from one division to another should schedule an appointment with an academic counselor regarding approval and course of study. Appointments can be made by calling 916.739.7089.

Faculty Directory

Linda Allison, Chief Assistant, Federal Defender, Eastern District of California, B.A., University of Arizona, J.D., University of Arizona College of Law

Louis Anapolsky, Partner, Knox Lemmon Anapolsky & Schrimp LLP, B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

Rachelle  Barbour, Assistant Federal Defender & Research and Writing Specialist, Sacramento, B.A., University of Michigan, J.D., University of Michigan Law School

Robin Basra, Staff Attorney, State Lottery, B.A., U.C. San Diego, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

Diane Boyer-Vine, Legislative Counsel, Legislative Counsel Bureau, B.A., C.S.U. Sacramento, J.D., UC Davis, King Hall School of Law

Melissa Brown, Director, Legal Clinics, Professor of Lawyering Skills, B.A., California State University, Chico, J.D., Loyola of Los Angeles

Adrienne Brungess, Professor of Lawyering Skills, B.A., San Diego State University, J.D., University of the Pacific, McGeorge

Gerald Caplan, Dean Emeritus, B.A., M.A., J.D., Northwestern University

Martin Carr, Principal Attorney, Belzer & Carr LLP, B.A., Stanford University, J.D., Yale University

Linda Carter, Professor of Law Emerita, B.A., University of Illinois, J.D., University of Utah

Ederlina Co, Assistant Professor of Lawyering Skills, J.D., Georgetown University Law Center, B.A., University of California, Berkeley

Stephen Cody, Visiting Assistant Professor of Law, Ph.D., UC Berkeley, J.D., Berkeley Law, M.A., UC Berkeley, M.Phil., Cambridge University, B.A., Temple University

Michael Colatrella Jr., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor of Law, B.A., Rutgers University, J.D., Seton Hall University, LL.M., New York University

Raymond Coletta, Professor Emeritus of Law, A.B., Colgate University, J.D., University of California, Berkeley

Matthew Crider, Adjunct Professor of Law, Crider Law Group, LLP, B.B.A., The University of Texas at Austin, M.P.A., The University of Texas at Austin, J.D., South Texas College of Law

Daniel Croxall, Assistant Professor of Lawyering Skills, Director, Capital Lawyering Certificate of Concentration, B.A., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, M.A., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

Donald Currier, Judge, Sacramento Superior Court, B.A., California State University, Sacramento, J.D., Lincoln University School of Law, Sacramento

Walter R. Dahl, Partner, Dahl Law, Attorneys at Law, B.A., University of the Pacific, J.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Omar Dajani, Professor of Law, Co-Director, McGeorge Global Center for Business and Development, Director, International Certificate of Concentration, B.A., Northwestern University, J.D., Yale Law School

Julie Davies, Director, Summer Program in Guatemala, Professor of Law, B.A., J.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Hector de Avila Gonzalez, Attorney, De Avila Law Firm, LL.B., Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes, Mexico, LL.M., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, Area of Practice: International & Mexican law, Year Graduated: 2003

Katerina Deaver, Associate, Mitchell Chadwick LLC, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

George Demos, Adjunct Professor of Law, Private Practice, Former U.S. SEC Enforcement Attorney, B.A., Columbia University, J.D., Fordham Law School

Donald Doernberg, Visiting Professor of Law Emeritus, Pace University School of Law, B.A., Yale University, J.D., Columbia University of Law

Alan Donato, Adjunct Professor of Law, Law Offices of Alan J. Donato, Inc., B.A., University of California Santa Barbara, J.D., University of California Santa Barbara

Shaun Edwards, Adjunct Professor of Law, Law Office of Shaun T. Edwards, B.A., Brigham Young University, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

Mark Eggleston, Lead Appellate Attorney, Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District, B.S., University of California, Davis, J.D., Santa Clara University

Laura Enderton-Speed, Division Chief, Office of Stakeholder Relations, California Public Employees Retirement System, B.A., San Jose State University, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

Michael Ewer, J.D. in Health Law from The University of Houston Law Center, L.L.M. in Health Law from The University of Houston Law Center

Gretchen Franz, Professor of Lawyering Skills, B.A., University of Colorado at Boulder, J.D., Washington and Lee University

Rex Frazier, President, Personal Insurance Federation of California, Adjunct Professor, Supervising Attorney, Legislative & Public Policy Clinic, Area of Practice: Capital Lawyering, Year Graduated: 2000, Undergraduate: University of Chicago, Major: B.A., M.P.P., Public Policy

Emily Garcia Uhrig, Professor of Law, B.A., University of Pennsylvania, J.D., Stanford Law School

Franklin Gevurtz, Distinguished Professor of Law, B.S., University of California, Los Angeles, J.D., University of California, Berkeley

Leslie Gielow Jacobs, Director, Capital Center for Law & Policy, Professor of Law, B.A., Wesleyan University, J.D., University of Michigan

Jennifer Harder, Assistant Professor of Lawyering Skills, Faculty Advisor, California Water Law Journal, B.A., University of California, Davis, J.D., University of California, Davis School of Law

Robert Hawley, Adjunct Professor of Law, Retired Interim Executive Director, California State Bar, B.A., California Western University, J.D., University of California, San Francisco, LL.M., New York University School of Law

Keith Hill, Deputy District Attorney, Sacramento County District Attorney, B.S., California State University, Sacramento, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

Jean Hobler, Adjunct Professor of Global Lawyering Skills, Elizabeth Jackson, Adjunct Professor of Law, Delfino Madden O'Malley Coyle & Koewler LLP, B.A., University of California, Davis, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

Paul Howard, Head of Faculty Services and International Research, B.A., California State University, Northridge, J.D., Loyola Law School, M.L.S., Indiana University

Michael A. Jeffrey,  Professor of Public Policy, Executive Director, Center for Business and Policy Research, Eberhardt School of Business, PhD, North Carolina State University, MS, the University of Maine, BA, Hamilton College

Warren Jones, Professor of Law Emeritus, B.A., California State University, San Jose, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

James Kachmar, Adjunct Professor of Law, Weintraub Tobin Chediak Coleman & Grodin, B.A., University of California, Davis, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

J. Clark Kelso, Professor of Law, B.A., University of Illinois, J.D., Columbia University

Charles Kelso, Professor of Law Emeritus, A.B., J.D., University of Chicago, LL.M., J.S.D., Columbia University, LL.D., John Marshall

John Kirlin, Director of the Program in Public Policy, Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, University of Notre Dame, BA, University of California, Los Angeles, MPA; Ph.D. (Political Science)

Dorothy S. Landsberg, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills, B.A., Earlham College, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

Brian K. Landsberg, Professor of Law Emeritus, B.A., University of California, Berkeley, LL.B., University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, Certificate in African Law, University of London

Stephen Lapham, Judge, Sacramento County Superior Court, B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, J.D., University of California, Hastings College of Law

Thomas J. Leach, Professor of Law Emeritus, Director, Trial & Appellate Advocacy Certificate of Concentration, B.A., Cornell University, M.A.T., Wesleyan University, J.D., University of Pennsylvania

Courtney Lee, Professor of Lawyering Skills, Director, Bar Support, B.S., Grove City College, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

James Leet, Shareholder, Boutin Jones Inc., A.B., St. Louis University, J.D., Santa Clara University, LL.M., University of Florida

Lawrence Levine, Director, Summer Program in Salzburg, Professor of Law, B.A., Allegheny College, J.D., University of California, Hastings

Hether Clash Macfarlane, Professor of Lawyering Skills, A.B., Connecticut College, M.A., University of California, Berkeley, J.D., Union University, Albany Law School

Michael Malloy, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Law, B.A., Georgetown University, J.D., University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D., Georgetown University

Christine Manolakas, Professor of Law, Director, Tax and Business Certificates of Concentration, B.A., University of Southern California, J.D., Loyola University, Los Angeles, LL.M. (Taxation) New York University

Aimee Martin, Hometown: Clayton, Calif., Undergraduate: U.C. Berkeley, Major: History, Year/Track: 4L

Jim Mayer, Founding President and CEO, California Forward, Adjunct Professor of Public Policy

Stephen McCaffrey, Distinguished Professor of Law, 2017 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate, B.A., University of Colorado, J.D., University of California, Berkeley, Dr. iur., University of Cologne, Germany

Christopher  Micheli, Principal, Aprea & Micheli, Inc., Adjunct Professor of Law, B.A., University of California, Davis, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, Area of Practice: Capital Lawyering, Year Graduated: 1992

Michael Mireles, Professor of Law, Director, Intellectual Property Certificate of Concentration, B.S., University of Maryland, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, LL.M. (Intellectual Property Law) George Washington University Law School

Richard Montarbo

Francis J. Mootz III, Professor of Law, J.D., Duke University School of Law, A.M., Philosophy, Duke University Graduate School, B.A., History, University of Notre Dame

Mary-Beth Moylan, Associate Dean for Experiential Learning, Professor of Lawyering Skills, Director, Global Lawyering Skills Program, B.A., Oberlin College, J.D., Case Western Reserve University

Steve Muni, Adjunct Professor of Law, Deputy Attorney General, Department of Justice, Bureau of Medi-Cal Fraud and Elder Abuse, B.A., Yale University, J.D., California Western School of Law

John E.B. Myers, Professor of Law, B.S., J.D., University of Utah

Chester A. Newland, Senior Professor of Public Administration, University of North Texas, Bachelor's in Government, University of Kansas, Ph.D in Political Science (Public Law and Administration)

Blake Nordahl, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills, Supervising Attorney, Immigration Clinic, B.A., University of California, Berkeley, J.D., University of California, Davis

David Norton, Adjunct Professor of Law, Boutin Jones, Inc., B.S., University of Wisconsin, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

Thomas J. Nussbaum, Adjunct Professor of Law, Former Chancellor, California Community Colleges, B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, J.D., California Western

Marianne O'Malley, Managing Principal Analyst, Legislative Analyst’s Office (retired), Adjunct Professor of Public Policy

Emily Whelan Parento, Associate Professor, Gordon D. Schaber Health Law Scholar, JD and LLM, Georgetown University Law Center, BBA, the University of Notre Dame

Marcie Paolinelli, Professor of Public Administration, Bachelor of Arts, Psychology, UC Davis, Master of Public Administration, University of Southern California, Doctor of Public Administration, University of Southern California

John Pezone, Deputy District Attorney, Sacramento County, B.A., Williams College, J.D., Golden Gate University

Jeffrey Proske, Professor of Lawyering Skills, B.A., University of Kansas, J.D., Boston University

Daniel Rainey, Adjunct Professor of Law, Chief of Staff, National Mediation Board, B.A., J.D.

Wanda Rouzan, Deputy Attorney General IV, California Dept. of Justice, Office of the Attorney General, B.A., Pomona College, J.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Matthew Ruyak, Adjunct Professor of Law, Office of the City Attorney, B.A., Boston University, J.D., UC Hastings College of Law

Kaitlyn Saberin, Adjunct Professor of Law, Attorney, Delfino Madden O'Malley Coyle & Koewler LLP, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, B.A., University of California, San Diego

Rachael Salcido, Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship and Diversity Initiatives, Professor of Law, Director, Environmental Certificate of Concentration, B.A., J.D., University of California, Davis

Ronald Sargis, Judge, U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Eastern District of California, B.A., Stanford University, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

Jesse Saucedo, Adjunct Professor of Law, Sacramento District Attorney, B.A., Carleton College, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

Jeff Schaff, Adjunct Professor of Law

Michael Hunter Schwartz, Dean and Professor of Law, AB, University of California, Berkeley, JD, UC Hastings College of the Law, Order of the Coif

Tiza Serrano Thompson & Associates, B.A., California State University, Long Beach, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

Richard Schickele, Clerk, Honorable Consuelo Callahan, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, B.A., Whitman College, M.A., George Washington University, J.D., University of California, Berkeley

Theresa Schriever, University of Wisconsin, Madison, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, Hometown: St. Paul, Minn., Undergraduate: University of Wisconsin, Madison, Major: Legal Studies and Criminal Justice Certificate, Year/Track: 2014/Day

Megan Shapiro, Associate, Radoslovich | Parker, B.A., University of Missouri, Columbia, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, LL.M., Temple University, Beasley School of Law

Monica Sharum, Head of Library Technology & Instructional Support, B.S., University of Wyoming, J.D., University of Wyoming, M.L.S., Indiana University

David Shaw, California National Guard, B.A., California State University, Sacramento, J.D., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

Stacey Shelley, Joseph Smallhoover, Partner of Bryan Cave LLP, Paris, J.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1980, M.A., University of Virginia, 1976, A.B., Duke University, magna cum laude, 1975

John Cary Sims, Professor of Law, Member of the Editorial Board, Journal of National Security Law & Policy, A.B., Georgetown University, J.D., Harvard University

Brian Slocum, Ph.D., Professor of Law, B.B.A., Pacific Union College, J.D., Harvard Law School, M.A., Linguistics, University of California, Davis, Ph.D., Linguistics, University of California, Davis

Joseph Smallhoover, Attorney at Law, Bryan Cave, Paris, A.B., Duke University, M.A., University of Virginia, J.D., University of Pittsburg 

Keith Smith, Associate Professor, Political Science at University of the Pacific, B.A., Political Science, Pepperdine University, Master of Public Management, University of Maryland, Master of Arts, Political Science, University of California Berkeley, Ph.D., Political Science, University of California Berkeley

JoAnne Speers, Adjunct Professor of Public Policy, B.A., UC Berkeley, J.D., UC Berkeley, M.P.P., UC Berkeley

John Sprankling, Distinguished Professor of Law, B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara, J.D., University of California, Berkeley, J.S.M., Stanford University

Edward Telfeyan, Professor of Lawyering Skills, Director, Moot Court Program, Co-Director of the Center for Advocacy and Dispute Resolution, B.A., Gettysburg College, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

Stephanie Thompson, Professor of Lawyering Skills, B.A., University of California, Davis, J.D., Georgetown University Law Center

Colleen Truden, Lecturer in Law, Director, Externship Program, B.A., Taylor University, J.D., Valparaiso University School of Law, L.L.M., McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

Wim van Rooyen, Adjunct Professor of Law, United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, B.A., University of Texas, J.D., Texas Wesleyan University School of Law

Mark Velasquez, Adjunct Professor of Law, Law Office of Mark R. Velasquez, B.A., Rutgers University, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

Michael Vitiello, Distinguished Professor of Law, B.A., Swarthmore College, J.D., University of Pennsylvania

Dan Wadhwani, Ryan Wood, Partner, Stoel Rives LLP, B.A., California State University Sacramento, J.D., McGeorge School of Law

William Wiecek, Chester Adgate Congdon Professor of Public Law and Legislation Emeritus, Syracuse  Law, B.A., Catholic University of America, LL.B., Harvard Law School, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin (Madison) 

James Wirrell, Assistant Dean for Library Services, B.A., Simon Fraser University, M.C.S., Regent College, LL.B., University of British Columbia, J.D., M.S.L.I.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Jarrod Wong, Professor of Law, Co-Director, McGeorge Global Center for Business and Development, Director, International Certificate of Concentration, B.A., Cambridge University, LL.M., University of Chicago, J.D., University of California, Berkeley

Kojo Yelpaala, Professor of Law, B.L., LL.B., University of Ghana, M.B.A., Bowling Green State University, Msc., S.J.D., University of Wisconsin

Timothy Zindel, Adjunct Professor of Law, Assistant Federal Defender, Office of Federal Defender, B.A., University of California at Los Angeles, J.D., UC Hastings College of Law

Law Courses

LAW 100. Skills Lab- Torts. 1 Unit.

This required first-year course teaches students "best practices" for studying the law and learning legal analytical skills, including IRAC rule-based methodology as a structure for legal analysis, case-briefing, outlining, time-management, and test-taking. This course will be integrated with one of the first-year substantive courses required for students in the fall semester.

LAW 101. Contracts/Analytical Skills. 4 Units.

Contracts/Analytical Skills course offers a practical introduction to a foundational area or areas of law and to the legal method. Students will learn best practices for studying law and developing foundational legal analytical skills so that they may read and understand case law, statutes, and regulations. These analytical skills will include IRAC rule-based methodology as a structure for legal analysis, case-briefing, outlining, and test-taking. Students will also practice negotiating and drafting agreements. This highly interactive course will utilize multiple formative and summative assessments.

LAW 102. Assessment & Review - 1st Year. 0 Units.

This is a non-graded, zero unit course which students are automatically enrolled in to provide a scheduled block in their schedule for assessment and review. Faculty believe that regular assessment and feedback about academic progress is key to student success and therefore schedule assessment throughout the semseter, particularly in bar-tested courses. Blocks of time have been designated for this purpose for first and second year students adn are labeled on your schedule as "Assessment & Review Sessios." These sessions will be held on an as-needed basis; students should plan their schedules accordingly by reserving these blocks in their individual calendars.

LAW 104. Legal Profession. 1 Unit.

The Legal Profession will prepare students to enter into modern legal practice and assist them in developing a professional identity. Students will be introduced to the common ethical dilemmas they will confront as externs, clinical students and practicing lawyers, as well as the role of emerging technology in the provision of legal services. Students will survey the variety of legal practice areas to help them to identify a satisfying career path and learn successful job seeking strategies. Upon registration in Legal Profession, students will be charged a $15 course material fee.

LAW 105. Civil Procedure. 2-4 Units.

Questions of jurisdiction and venue; federal subject matter jurisdiction such as diversity and federal question ­jurisdiction; notice and code pleading; Federal Rules of Civil Procedure ­governing joinder of claims and parties; discovery; summary and default judgments; the right to a jury trial in civil matters; and issues of finality of judgments; appropriate examples drawn from California law.

LAW 110. Contracts. 4 Units.

Formation at common law and under the Uniform Commercial Code; consideration and other bases for enforcing promises; when writing is required; parole evidence and interpretation; ­unconscionability and other defenses; rights of third parties; excuses for ­nonperformance; conditions, performance and breach; damages.

LAW 115. Criminal Law. 2-4 Units.

The purpose of criminal law, the procedures by which it is enforced, and its substantive content, including offenses against the person, habitation and property; imputability and responsibility; modifying circumstances negating responsibility; and limitations on criminal capacity. This course will be offered in both an experiential format and an analytical skills format.

LAW 122. Global Lawyering Skills I. 2 Units.

Introduction to basic lawyering skills including legal research, writing, and analysis with an emphasis on objective legal reasoning. Students are taught to perform on-line and traditional research in primary and secondary authorities, and are introduced to research in international sources. Writing assignments build in complexity and include memoranda, client letters, and contract drafting, and are based on simulated case files.

LAW 125. Property. 4 Units.

Historical background, possessory and non-possessory interests in land and personalty, creation and transfer of property interests, concurrent estates, landlord and tenant law, public ­regulation of property, eminent domain.

LAW 131. Torts. 4 Units.

The law of civil injuries. Civil liability for interference with a broad array of legally protected interests, focusing on such topics as intentional wrongdoing, ­negligence, defective products, abnormally dangerous activities, defamation, invasion of privacy, and misrepresentation. Alternatives to the existing tort system will be discussed. (Please note that this course also includes a one-unit Analytical Skills Lab for a total of 5 units.).

LAW 132. United States Supreme Court Seminar. 1 Unit.

The course will involve in depth study of a topic relating to decision-making in the United States Supreme Court, such as Supreme Court Jurisprudence, Current Issues before the United States Supreme Court, or the Influence of Justices' Backgrounds on their Judicial Decision-Making. (This course is required of first year students in the spring term of their first year as part of the Accelerated Honors Program.).

LAW 151. Business Associations. 4 Units.

Includes partnerships and nature and formation, capacity and authority of corporations; problems of management; liabilities of officers, directors and shareholders; issuance of shares, distribution of earnings; consolidation, merger and dissolution.

LAW 155. Community Property. 2 Units.

Initiation and existence of the marital community; nature of interests in property as separate or community; ­management, control and liability of property for obligations; conflict of laws; dissolution of the community, including settlement and support; changing views of community property under equal rights laws.

LAW 163. Constitutional Law. 4 Units.

This course will introduce students to the United States Constitution. Coverage may include federalism; separation of powers; the role of the courts (including justiciability); legislative powers; presidential powers; the regulation and protection of the national economy; protection of individual rights under the Constitution; equal protection; due process, including its substantive and procedural aspects; and First Amendment freedoms.

LAW 165. Criminal Procedure. 3 Units.

Constitutional regulation of the administration of criminal justice, including due process of law, unreasonable searches and seizures, compulsory self-incrimination, and the right to counsel; selected ­problems in criminal investigation, trial, and post-conviction remedies.

LAW 170. Wills and Trusts. 3 Units.

Coverage includes intestate succession; validity and operation of wills; probate and administration of trusts and estates; use of trusts in estate planning; duties of trustee; rights of beneficiaries and enforcement of trusts. Prerequisite: LAW 125.

LAW 174. Evidence. 4 Units.

The law of evidence in civil and criminal trials, including judicial notice, burden of proof, presumptions, functions of judge and jury, competency and privileges of witnesses; principal rules of admissibility and exclusion of testimony of witnesses and documents.

LAW 178. Evidence (ITAP). 4 Units.

This integrated course coordinates topics covered in Evidence with skills learned in Trial Advocacy. In Trial Advocacy, students learn how to analyze a trial file, construct a case theory, and practice all phases of trial. At the end of the course, students conduct a full-day jury trial. In Evidence, students learn how to analyze admissibility issues under Federal and State Rules of Evidence and work through evidentiary issues concurrently with issues raised in their skills classes, such as making and meeting objections, articulating offers of proof, and learning evidentiary foundations. The concepts taught in Evidence every week are reinforced in Trial Advocacy exercises, while skills taught in Trial Advocacy every week, are reinforced in Evidence hypotheticals. This concurrent study of evidentiary issues with their practical application in the trial setting is designed to reinforce a deep understanding of both Evidence and Trial Advocacy in context. The Integrated Course satisfies the requirement of Evidence, earning students 4-units for Evidence, and qualifies as an elective earning 3 credits for Trial Advocacy. Students who enroll in the combined course must take and complete all 7 units. (Evidence, Graded; Trial Advocacy, optional; Graded/Pass-Fail). Automatically enrolled in course 812. (Practicum).

LAW 182. Global Lawyering Skills II. 2 Units.

A continuation of the lawyering skills training provided in GLS Introduction. Students prepare trial and appellate court briefs and oral arguments using a simulated case file. Students work through a year-long problem representing one side of a simulated case. They are introduced to domestic and transnational legal issues, as well as strategic considerations concerning representations, litigation, and alternative dispute resolution. There is a GLS Appellate Brief Fee of $7 for this course.

LAW 185. Professional Responsibility. 2 Units.

Regulation of the legal profession and the ethical responsibilities of its members; the attorney-client relationship; advertising, solicitation and group legal service plans; compensation for legal services; fiduciary duties to client; avoiding conflicts of ­interest; competent representation; withdrawal from representation; duties and limitations on zealous representation; obligations to other attorneys, the court and the public; judicial ethics.

LAW 190. Remedies and Principles of Law. 3 Units.

This course will cover basic principles of core substantive law and remedies, including injunctions, restitution and damages. Instruction will be on-line and in-class. Students will practice using the rules of law and remedies to answer bar-type essay, multiple choice and performance test questions effectively.

LAW 200. Accounting for Lawyers. 2-3 Units.

This course provides exposure to principles of accounting from the perspective of the practicing attorney. Students will study the fundamentals of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), as will an array of legal issues important to both transactional attorneys and litigators. Students who are Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) or undergraduate accounting majors may not enroll in this course. (P/F).

LAW 204. Principles of Agency. 1 Unit.

A study of the theory and application of select principles of Agency law. This course also focuses on the study, organizational, writing and expression skills necessary for law school, the bar examination, and legal practice. The course will have a specific focus on legal analysis, including rule synthesis, deductive reasoning, analogical reasoning, issue analysis, as well as other skills such as exam preparation, time management, and outlining. Students will complete various assessment exercises and will receive detailed feedback on their work. This course meets before classes begin in August and/or during the fall semester. By invitation only or with Director approval. (JD preferred.).

LAW 209. Local Agency Practice. 2 Units.

California has thousands of local agencies and special districts providing essential services. This course explores local agency decision making in a variety of substantive areas. In this active learning course, the substantive mandates and policies are integrated into practical simulations and realistic legal assignments that emphasize advocacy, negotiation, and litigation. The litigation component examines administrative and traditional writs in addition to validation and reverse validation actions - unique and specialized lawsuits brought to challenge government actions. The course will focus on the substantive areas of the Brown Act, Public Records Act, California Environmental Quality Act, and Political Reform Act. (Practicum).

LAW 210. Business Planning. 2-3 Units.

Consideration of selected problems involving the organization, financing, operation, and restructuring of business enterprises. The problems require the combined consideration and application of corporate, tax, and securities law, accounting and financial matters, and business considerations and strategies. The problems also raise pertinent questions regarding the relationship between the business client and counsel and attendant problems concerning a lawyer’s professional responsibility. Students may be expected to prepare research memoranda, legal opinions, and draft necessary documents. Prerequisites: LAW 151; LAW 300.

LAW 211. Entrepreneurial Management. 2 Units.

This online course introduces students to the knowledge, skills, and processes involved in innovation and entrepreneurship. Topics include how to generate new business ideas, how to evaluate new business opportunities, how to assemble human, financial, and strategic resources for a new firm, and how to manage growth and exits. Lessons will be delivered through online lectures, cases, and exercises, but there will also be flexible opportunities to meet individually and in small groups with the professor and with Sacramento-area entrepreneurs. The course will pay particular attention to the application of innovation and entrepreneurship to legal and other professional services. Students will be required to develop and pitch their own new business idea. the course is aimed at students seeking greater knowledge of the business skills involved in innovation and entrepreneurship. Scheduling note: Although the course is online, 15% of the course (approximately 2 sessions) will be in person and will be scheduled at mutually agreeable times after the class begins and will be based on meeting times that work for the participants. These 2 sessions will be mandatory.

LAW 212. Intro. to Legal Analysis. 2 Units.

Choices of policies and design of programs are core responsibilities of any public body. How these choices are made is critical. The chosen policies and programs shape the potential to achieve desired objectives, influence whether and how a public agency interacts with other public and private sector organizations involved in the same issue, some even working toward the same goal. Very importantly, how these choices are made and the choices themselves determine the roles of citizens beyond elections and also the roles of stakeholders. This course focuses on the design elements of these choices that cross any single department, sometimes seen at the level of a whole government-a nation, state, county, city or special district. Examples include how councils, boards or commissions develop calendars of work, including enacting ordinances and regulations, adopting budgets, or managing collective bargaining. Some important designs are externally imposed on organizations, including prescriptions of constitutionally superior governments, as well as standards established by professional bodies, such as the Government Accounting Standards Board. Students in the course develop tools to strategically analyze these design choices and assess how important features of a policy process can be changed. Many of the concepts and tools are also relevant to larger non-profit organizations and some are relevant to for-profit firms.

LAW 214. Small Business Seminar. 2 Units.

Small Business Seminar LAW 214 has a Pre Req of Business Associations - Law 150 or LAW 151.

LAW 216. The Business of Lawyering. 1 Unit.

This course uses an interactive model to explore the business side of law firms, including the critical skills needed to establish and operate a law firm as a solo or small firm practitioner. In addition, it provides an understanding of how larger law firms operate. It covers a broad array of topics related to the various dimensions of law practice, including business, clients, and life management. Business plans, marketing and client development, professional development, office management, and financial and ethical issues are among the subjects to be covered. Enrollment limit. (P/F) (Practicum).

LAW 220. Banking Law. 3 Units.

Introduction to the regulation of banks, savings and loan associations and their holding companies, particularly as they compete or interact with investment banks, securities dealers, real estate brokers, credit card issuers, and related financial services institutions.

LAW 225. Bankruptcy. 2-3 Units.

This course examines the United States Bankruptcy Code and the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure. Areas of emphasis are: eligibility for and dismissal of a bankruptcy case; claims against a debtor; treatment of executory contracts and leases; exemptions; discharge of indebtedness; and reorganizations in Chapter 11. The course material will give students a solid introduction to bankruptcy law and its application to the debtor-creditor relationship.

LAW 230. Water Resources Law. 2-3 Units.

This course introduces the legal principles that control water allocation for human and environmental purposes, taught via a combination of in-person class meetings and online exercises such as lectures, readings, videos, discussion and research. Legal principles covered include: categories of surface and groundwater rights, management approaches, allocation for environmental purposes, federal-state relationships, tribal and reserved rights, reasonable use, waste, and the public trust doctrine. Students gain practical understanding of water allocation and use in contemporary society, as well as critically examine the social policies that govern water management. Classes will meet in Classroom A on Mondays and Thursdays; other instruction will be in an online format, with support from the professor, structured to provide regular interaction with the professor and other students. Students are precluded from enrolling in this course if they have completed Water Resources Law in a different format.

LAW 232. Foundations of Water, Natural Resources and Environmental Law Practice 1. 2 Units.

An introduction to the natural water cycle and human efforts to divert, extract, store, transport and govern water. Topics include: hydrology and hydrogeology; water systems modeling; environmental uses of water; governance and operation of water systems; the design, construction, operation and maintenance of water diversion, pumping, storage, delivery and treatment systems; water chemistry and water re-use. (Open to J.D. students and practitioners with the permission of the Program Director) Prerequisite: PRIOR OR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT IN LAW 230 OR LAW 621, OR THE EQUIVALENTS.

LAW 235. Environmental Practice. 3 Units.

This case-study course helps students to develop fundamental skills necessary for administrative practice and judicial review in natural resources cases. The examples are primarily drawn from problems typically faced by water resources attorneys but with applications to a broader range of natural resources, environmental, and land-use law practices. (Open to J.D. students; Practitioners may enroll with professor permission.) Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in any one of the following courses: LAW 230 Water Resources Law, LAW 621 International Water Resources Law, LAW 510 Natural Resources Law, LAW 507 Environmental Law or equivalents. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 240. Insurance Law. 2-3 Units.

Personal, property and liability insurance; governmental supervision of insurance; formation of the insurance contract; insurable interest; concealment, warranties, representations; subrogation, waiver and estoppel; incontestability; the respective rights and interests of the beneficiary, insured, insurer, assignee and creditor.

LAW 255. Federal Securities Regulations. 3 Units.

Students study the Securities Act of 1933 and the securities registration process, statutory and administrative exemptions from registration, and civil liabilities; reporting requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; the role of the Securities and Exchange Commission; and the ethical obligations of securities lawyers. Prerequisite: Business Associations (Practicum).

LAW 257. Business Transactions: The Art of the Deal. 2 Units.

This experiential course focuses generally on negotiation and drafting components found in typical business transactions, including due diligence investigation, representations, warranties, indemnifications, provisions related to the allocation of risk of loss dispute resolution. With guided instruction, and through individual and team exercises, students develop effective mechanisms for managing long-term contractual relationships, analyze deal documentation, consider negotiating strategies, negotiate and draft typical components of business agreements, including leases, licensing agreements, purchase and sale agreements, employment and non-compete agreements. Enrollment limit. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: LAW 151 (Practicum).

LAW 260. Commercial Law. 3 Units.

This course covers Articles 3, 4, 4A, and 5 Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), as well as federal statutes and regulations pertaining to the creation and transfer of negotiable instruments and liability of parties thereto, bank deposits and collection, wholesale funds transfers, electronic funds transfers, and letters of credit. Also discussed is Article 9 UCC pertaining to the creation of security interests in personal property and fixtures and the sale of accounts and chattel paper, the validity of such interests as against third parties, requirements for perfection, priorities among competing interests, rights to proceeds of the collateral, and rights and duties upon default of the secured debt. Article 6 UCC pertaining to bulk sales, and Article 7 UCC pertaining to title is also considered.

LAW 261. Sales of Goods. 3 Units.

This course covers all stages of contracts for the sale of goods in domestic and international transactions including documentary sales and electronic transactions. Focus is upon existing Article 2 and revised Article I of the Uniform Commercial Codes. Selected coverage of certain aspects of article 2A and revised Article 5; of acts dealing with electronic communications; of federal consumer protection acts; and of the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.

LAW 265. Copyright Law. 2-3 Units.

This course explores ownership rights in expressive information and contrasts these rights with ownership interests in technological information; students study what information is protected by copyright from entertainment to computer based information structures; the rights of a copyright owner including the rights to make copies, transfer copies, perform and display works and the right to make derivative works, as well as moral rights in a copyrightable work; statutory exemptions from copyright in the form of compulsory licenses; as well as common law based licenses for fair uses; duration of protection and other technical rules; and international copyright protection through the Universal Copyright Convention and the Berne Convention.

LAW 266. Patent Law. 3 Units.

This course covers introductory and intermediate materials concerning invention protection mechanisms. Patent prosecution and litigation matters are stressed; alternative trade secret protection schemes are developed. Relevant statutes, case law, Patent and Trademark Office procedures, and patent application drafting are included.

LAW 275. Survey of Intellectual Property Law. 3 Units.

An introductory survey of federal and state laws which regulate trade practices is presented, including an examination of patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret law; deceptive advertising and product disparagement; federal and state consumer protection laws; and the right of publicity.

LAW 280. U.S. Antitrust and International Competition Law. 2 Units.

This course will introduce general principles of United States antitrust and global competition law through a series of case studies comparing U.S. and European Union actions against alleged cartels, monopolies and mergers. This course is designed to be a substitute for the traditional domestic U.S. antitrust law course and assumes no prior grounding in the topic.

LAW 285. Trademark Law. 2 Units.

This course examines the common-law and statutory laws governing the protection of business identity, including laws for the protection of trade names, trademarks, service marks, trade dress, product configuration, and domain names. Methods for selecting and protecting trade identity, including procedures for registering marks with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and applicable litigation and licensing strategies are also explored.

LAW 290. Computer and Internet Law. 2-3 Units.

This course explores the various methods of protecting computer technology through application of principles of contract, patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret law. It also examines the business and legal problems that confront those who use and rely upon computers and the Internet in the conduct of their businesses. Standard legal agreements used in computer and Internet industries, as well as uniform laws governing computer and Internet transactions, are discussed.

LAW 297. Sports Law. 2 Units.

Considers key legal issues affecting professional sports industry, including application of antitrust laws and the effect of industry-wide collective bargaining agreements. Varying practices and their ramifications are studied for baseball, football, basketball, and hockey.

LAW 299. Entertainment Law. 2 Units.

Considers key legal issues affecting the entertainment industry. Varying practices and their ramifications are studied for movies, television, live theater, music, and print publishing. Prerequisite: LAW 265.

LAW 300. Federal Income Taxation. 3 Units.

This course covers the fundamentals of federal income taxation with emphasis on the taxation of ¬individuals. Subject areas include gross income, assignment of income, exclusions, gains and losses, deductions, nonrecognition transactions, and income tax accounting. Special consideration is given to issues of tax policy and the development of skills necessary for working with the Internal Revenue Code. (Practicum).

LAW 302. Estate and Gift Tax/Estate Planning. 3 Units.

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of Federal transfer taxation, including the estate tax, the gift tax, and the generation skipping transfer tax, and a study of the planning techniques utilizing lifetime and testamentary transfers, life insurance, and other vehicles to best achieve the intentions of the owner as to the disposition of accumulated wealth. Prerequisite or Concurrent Enrollment: LAW 170.

LAW 304. Mental Health - Policy and Law. 2 Units.

This course is designed to expose students to legal and policy current issues arising in the context of government regulation and treatment of persons with serious mental health problems. Course coverage includes such issues as involuntary civil commitment, predictions of dangerousness, assessment of competency, the rights to treatment and to refuse treatment, and the relationship between mental health diagnoses and criminal responsibility and punishment. Students will undertake a substantial research and writing project.

LAW 306. Transnational Lawyering. 2 Units.

This course offers a practical introduction to the global legal order. Through a series of lectures and exercises, students will explore how lawyers navigate the intersection between the world’s legal systems, as well as the challenges presented by intercultural practice. Students will learn about the structure and sources of international law, the relationship between international law and domestic law and practice, and key distinctions among the common law, civil law, and Islamic legal systems. (Practicum).

LAW 308. Art of Plea Bargaining. 1 or 2 Unit.

This skills-based course will be comprised of lectures, demonstrations, role-plays and simulated motion practice and will focus on interpersonal communication used by criminal trial attorneys in negotiations at each stage of litigation in state and federal court. The course will include plea bargaining, charge and sentencing issues, written and oral motion practice and tactical and ethical considerations in the context of negotiating for clients. (Limited Enrollment.).

LAW 310. Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders. 3 Units.

Students study the federal income taxation of corporations and their shareholders, including formation and capital structure, dividends and other corporate distributions, redemptions, liquidations, and reorganizations. Prerequisite: LAW 300 (Practicum).

LAW 314. Taxation of Partnerships and S Corporations. 3 Units.

This course focuses on federal income tax treatment of pass-through entities, including partnerships, limited liability companies, and S corporations and their owners, dealing with classification, formation, allocations, distributions, liquidations, and reorganizations. Prerequisite: LAW 300 (Practicum).

LAW 325. Taxation of Real Estate Transactions. 3 Units.

Students study federal income tax treatment of real property dispositions, including gifts and bequests, sales of a principal residence, like kind exchanges, involuntary conversions, and deferred payment sales. Consideration is also given to the determination of gain and loss, encumbrances on real property, treatment of capital gains and losses, limitations on tax shelters, and the alternative minimum tax. Prerequisite: LAW 300 (Practicum).

LAW 375. U.S. Taxation of International Transactions. 3 Units.

The course covers the application of federal income tax laws to U.S. citizens, residents, and corporations investing or doing business without the United States and nonresident aliens and foreign corporations investing or doing business within the United States. The course emphasizes fundamental issue of cross-border activities, including jurisdiction to impose tax, source of income provisions, foreign tax credit, income tax treaties, U.S. anti-deferral regime, transfer pricing, and nonrecognition transactions with foreign entities. (Practicum).

LAW 400. Advanced Criminal Procedure. 2 Units.

Students study the criminal process from the initial court appearance through sentencing, with particular emphasis on constitutional issues such as double jeopardy, jury trial, discovery, the plea bargaining process, and procedures relating to the preliminary hearing and to sentencing. Prerequisite: LAW 165.

LAW 405. Worker's Compensation Law. 2 Units.

This course will examine case law and the statutory, regulatory framework of the California Worker’s Compensation system. Students will study employment relationships, causation of injury, benefits, procedure and practice, including trial preparation and appellate review. Classroom exercises and assignments will involve real-life scenarios that require students to use critical thinking and analysis to develop advice and strategies for potential clients (injured workers, employers and insurers). Students will develop a working knowledge of this complex system which covers all California workers and their employers. (Practicum).

LAW 410. White Collar Crime. 2 Units.

This course is an examination of substantive and procedural issues that arise in the investigation and adjudication of various business crimes, including the methodology for identifying criminal intent in business activity, corporate liability for acts of employees, corporate officer liability for acts of corporate agents, strict liability of corporate officers for hazardous work place conditions, constitutional and common law privileges of business entities, the operation of the investigative grand jury, immunity, searches of business premises, and the interplay between civil and criminal proceedings.

LAW 415. Criminal Law Defenses. 2 Units.

The moral underpinnings of, and public policy controversies regarding, criminal law defenses. Among the topics likely to be covered are: the purpose of criminal law defenses; categorization of defenses, and the moral/legal controversies surrounding traditional defenses (e.g., self-defense and duress) and proposed new defenses (e.g., battered-women defense, “rotten social backgrounds,” brainwashing, euthanasia). (Limited enrollment).

LAW 433. Employment Law. 3 Units.

Students study the creation and termination of employment relationships; employment discrimination; regulation of wages, hours and conditions of employment; occupational safety and health regulation; workers’ compensation, and unemployment insurance. (Excludes union representation and collective bargaining- See LAW 555) (Practicum).

LAW 440. Family Law. 2-3 Units.

This course focuses on the changing definitions of “family” and “marriage:” pre-marital agreements; unmarried couples; domestic partnership; dissolution of marriage and domestic partnership; annulment; financial consequences of dissolution; parent-child relations; custody of children and visitation; child support and spousal support; domestic violence; child maltreatment; and adoption. (Practicum).

LAW 442. Alternatives to Litigation in Family Law. 2 Units.

This experiential course integrates family law theory and mediation practice with business development. Family law practice is changing to increasingly favor out-of-court dispute resolution. To succeed in the emerging field of cooperative divorce, an attorney must have technical, emotional, marketing and business skills. This course combines lecture, lab activities, and role play exercises, elevating basic mediation skills and family law knowledge to explore the unique and varied skill set required to build - and enjoy, a cooperative divorce practice. Prerequisite: LAW 440- Family Law. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 450. Juvenile Law. 1 Unit.

This course includes an in-depth analysis of issues relating to juvenile court procedure and practice, including delinquency, child abuse and neglect, and termination of parental rights. Students learn about the role of the attorney in the juvenile court.

LAW 465. Federal Habeas Corpus. 3 Units.

Students study state and federal habeas corpus proceedings and policies, including the history of the “Great Writ;” the complex requirements for habeas corpus proceedings; the exhaustion doctrine; cognizable claims; legal representation; nature of the proceedings and relief; ¬successive petitions; and recent changes in the law.

LAW 500. Administrative Law. 3 Units.

Students study the practices and procedures of administrative agencies; jurisdiction and judicial review applicable to administrative agencies; scope and effect of their decisions; legislation applicable to administrative agencies.

LAW 501. CA Enviro. Cases & Places. 1-2 Units.

This course will center on a three-and-a-half-day field trip that will take students to world-class teaching locations in eastern and southeastern California. The field trip will employ a truly unique, interdisciplinary approach that will help students experience the locations we will visit from two distinctly different perspectives – law and environmental science. The field trip follows a 1,000-mile loop from Sacramento, east over the Sierra Nevada to South Lake Tahoe, then down I-395 to Mono Lake and then southeast to the dustbowl of Owens Dry Lake, Death Valley, and the Mojave Desert, and then finally back to Sacramento via the farmlands of the Central Valley. The list of locations we will visit during the trip reads like a who’s who of California’s most interesting (and vexing) environmental problems. Upon registration in CA Environmental Cases & Places, students will be charged a $250 fee for travel related expenses.

LAW 503. Legislation and Statutory Interpretation. 3 Units.

In this age of statutory proliferation, an understanding of how courts interpret statutes is a crucial skill every attorney should possess. The dominant purpose of this class is to train students to make effective statutory interpretation arguments on behalf of their clients. Through a combination of exercises and cases, the class explores the academic and judicial debate concerning appropriate methods of statutory interpretation. In addition to studying the legislative process, students will learn different devices that are used in the interpretation of statutes, such as canons of construction, legislative history and precedent, as well as different theories of statutory interpretation, such as textualism, dynamic statutory interpretation and purposive interpretation. (Practicum).

LAW 506. Law and Literature. 1-2 Units.

This reading course focuses on the representation of law, lawyers, and legal and ethical issues in world literature. Each seminar participant is required to prepare a presentation on one of the pre-selected ¬literary works and to discuss (i) how the law and lawyers are presented in the work; (ii) what legal, socio-political or ethical problem(s) the work highlights; (iii) how the work resolves the problem(s), if at all; and (iv) how the work might influence a reader’s understanding of the law. Participation in the seminar is limited to ten students, who are expected to choose one of the designated works prior to the beginning of the program. Grading will be based upon the student’s presentation and a short summary paper.

LAW 507. Environmental Law. 3 Units.

This course is a survey of legal principles and policies relating to protection and enhancement of the physical environment. Particular attention is given to common law doctrines and public rights and remedies; federal and state control programs for the fields of air pollution, water pollution, noise, solid waste management, fish and wildlife resources; planning for federal, state and local administrative agencies.

LAW 509. Special Topics in Environmental Law. 2 or 3 Units.

This course will explore a specific field or issue in environmental law. The particular focus of the course, course requirements, and any prerequisites will be provided in the registration materials for the semester in which the course is offered. Students will be required to complete a substantial scholarly paper. Priority will be given students pursuing the Environmental Law Concentration. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: LAW 507.

LAW 510. Natural Resources Law. 3 Units.

Students examine the law and policy relating to the use of federally owned lands for the production or enjoyment of various natural resources. Major themes include the history of federal public land law and policy, the jurisdictional authority of the federal government and the states over public lands, and the respective roles of the federal legislative, executive and judicial branches in formulating and enforcing natural resources law and policy. Specific natural resources considered include water, minerals, timber, grazing, wildlife, recreation, and the preservation of historical and environmental values. (Practicum).

LAW 511. Climate Change Law & Policy. 2 Units.

Climate change is a serious threat to human health and the environment. This course is a survey of the legal tools employed to address global climate change through mitigation and adaptation measures at the international and domestic levels. These measures are relevant to many areas of law practice including water, land use, business, real estate, municipal, legislative, and public law as well as environmental and natural resources. The course will explore the legal regime created at the international level, U.S. responses at the state and local levels, and common law based litigation. Particular attention will be paid to mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions through the Clean Air Act, renewable energy policies, and various initiatives in the transportation, energy and building sectors.

LAW 513. California Lobbying & Politics. 2 Units.

This course explores how power and influence operate in the California Legislature. The first part of the course examines the processes and pressures a California legislator typically encounters prior to casting a vote in the Legislature, including campaigns for local and state office; fundraising; the influence of political parties and partisan leadership; grassroots supporters; and Sacramento-based interests. The second part of the course develops theories of legislative persuasion, including a blend of traditional advocacy skills and political strategy. The course includes a mock legislative hearing exercise at the State Capitol.

LAW 515. Conflict of Laws. 3 Units.

Students study the law applicable to private interstate and international transactions. Domicile, jurisdiction, recognition of foreign judgments and family law matters (divorce, annulment, alimony, custody) as well as choice of law problems in torts, contracts, and other transactions are covered.

LAW 517. Statutes and Regulations. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to strategies and techniques for interpreting and applying statutes and regulations in the modern administrative state. Topics include foundational issues important to public law, such as the legislative process, doctrines of statutory interpretation, the structure of administrative law, and the role of agencies in interpreting and enforcing statutory schemes.

LAW 518. Public Authority in Use. 2 Units.

Examines capacity for effective authoritative decisions beyond single jurisdictions or agencies, such as joint powers authorities, MOUs, contracts, statutes or court determinations (e.g., preemption) and others. Also examines devices for joint actions across sectors or which seek to direct individual behaviors.

LAW 526. Mediation. 2-3 Units.

This course provides functional knowledge of the power and practice of mediation, which is increasingly being used to resolve both litigated and non-litigated disputes. Mediation employs a natural third party, the mediator, to help disputing parties make better decisions concerning whether and how to settle a dispute. This course examines the theoretical, legal, ethical, and practical aspects of mediation through lecture, discussion, video simulations and extensive interactive exercises and role-plays. Students will learn to conduct mediations in step-by-step process. This course also covers how to represent a client effectively in mediation and explores appropriate applications of mediation. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 528. Online Dispute Resolution. 1 Unit.

Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) is an experiential class designed to introduce professional skills related to the use of technology as part of an alternative dispute resolution (ADR) practice. Students will engage in classroom work and discussions to become familiar with the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on ADR practice and ethics, but the bulk of the course time will be spent using ICT applications and interacting with the instructor and fellow students regarding the appropriate use of ICT. Course work will demand that students engage in collaborative efforts to assess and use ICT in work with case fact patterns. Feedback will be in the form of group de-briefings, and in direct feedback from the instructor. (Simulation).

LAW 535. First Amendment. 3 Units.

This course is an in-depth and comprehensive study of freedom of speech including political speech, defamation, obscenity, commercial speech and the press. Also included will be a review of governmental demand for information as well as freedom of religion, including the establishment and free exercise clause Prerequisite: Completion of LAW 163.

LAW 550. Immigration Law and Policy. 3 Units.

This course covers legal issues and policies pertaining to non- U.S. citizens, including the regulation of their admission into and removal from the United States, and/or their naturalization as U.S. citizens. This course critically examines how and why the rights of noncitizens who are in U.S. territory differ from the rights of citizens. These topics will be covered from various perspectives, including constitutional law, human rights, ethics and morality, and history.

LAW 555. Labor Law. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the right to organize; organization of labor unions, strikes; picketing; boycotts, collective bargaining; unfair labor practices of employers and unions; the union member and his union; the National Labor Relations Act and the Labor Management Relations Act; preemption of State regulation.

LAW 560. Land Use Planning. 2 Units.

A survey of various types of governmental controls on land use including zoning, subdivision controls, official maps, building codes and eminent domain. Prerequisite: LAW 125.

LAW 568. California Initiative Seminar. 2 Units.

This course involves a detailed review of the California initiative process and specialized research techniques appropriate for understanding initiative measures. Each student prepares an objective analysis of one or more initiatives that are likely to appear on an upcoming California statewide ballot. The analysis includes a clear description of what the initiative does, whether there are serious ambiguities in the text of the initiative, and whether the initiative is likely to be held constitutional if challenged. The analysis does not include a recommendation of how people should vote or comments about the wisdom of the initiative. (Practicum).

LAW 570. Health Law. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the U.S. health care system and public policies and laws that impact both health care providers and consumers of health care. Topics covered include federal and state regulation of hospitals, physicians and managed care organizations; standards of care and medical malpractice; privacy and -confidentiality; informed consent; access to care and federal/state reform proposals; public and private financing of health care; forms of health care enterprises, and end of life issues.

LAW 572. Public Health Law. 3 Units.

Students study legal powers and duties of government to assure the conditions necessary for the public to be healthy (e.g., to identify, prevent, and ameliorate health risks to the population), and the limitations on government’s power to constrain the autonomous, privacy, proprietary, and other legally protected interests of individuals for the protection and promotion of public health. Topics covered include the foundation and scope of public health state policy powers; health promotion, persuasion, and free expression control of infectious diseases; bioterrorism; public health regulation of property and the professions; tort law’s role in public health; and obesity and the scope of public health.

LAW 576. Intro to Capital Lawyering. 2 Units.

This course introduces students to the lawyer's role in developing, modifying, implementing, advocating, and influencing public policy, including: legislation, regulations, executive orders, court orders, and other policy edicts at the national, state, and local levels. Students learn how to do policy analysis; learn the essential organization and procedures of the various policymaking venues; are able to consider and weigh strategic implications associated with the various venues and processes; conduct research using a variety of sources unique to policymaking in California and other settings; learn and develop skills for advocacy, negotiation and compromise in a policymaking setting; and practice applying course knowledge and skills to important public policy matters of the day. Students complete a project on an actual and current public policy problem.

LAW 579. Affordable Care Act Seminar. 2 Units.

This seminar will examine the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act, exploring the objectives of the Act as well as the impact that implementation and legal challenges have had on the likelihood that the Act's objectives will be achieved. Topics will include an overview of healthcare delivery in the U.S., the Affordable Care Act's structure, legal challenges and interpretative issues such as Medicaid expansion, the individual mandate, challenges to availability of subsidies, the essential health benefits and related requirements (i.e., contraceptive mandate, preventive screenings, etc.), and current and future developments in healthcare reform. The students undertake a substantial research and writing project. Enrollment limit.

LAW 600. Public International Law. 3 Units.

Students study the nature, sources and evolution of international law; relation of international law to municipal law; subjects of international law; peaceful settlement of disputes; international agreements; state responsibility and treatment of aliens; the use of force; the role of international organizations.

LAW 608. International and Foreign Legal Research. 1-2 Units.

The course examines methods, strategies, and sources for international and foreign legal research. The emphasis is on developing research skills in the area of international law, although the course will also include instruction related to foreign legal systems. General topics to be covered include treaties, customary international law, international courts and arbitration. (P/F).

LAW 614. International Protection of Human Rights. 3 Units.

This course explores the law governing the international protection of human rights and the institutional mechanisms through which such protection may be achieved; Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the role of the United Nations; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; genocide, and human rights issues relating to armed conflict, refugees, and reconciliation; treaties and non-treaty arrangements, including international criminal prosecutions; European Convention on Human Rights and other regional systems of protection; activities of non-governmental organizations; enforcement of human rights standards within the United States.

LAW 616. Marijuana Law Seminar. 2 Units.

Over half of Americans live in states where they may obtain marijuana for medical or recreational use without fear of prosecution by the state. Despite that, they are violating federal law when they possess even a small amount of marijuana. At the same time, the sheer number of states adopting these laws is propelling the US towards a national solution. The overlay of state, local and federal laws creates a complex pattern of legal requirements – such conflicts create a demand for lawyers. This seminar focuses on an array of legal issues: for example, what is federal law and policy regarding marijuana? What are the states doing and how can they do so despite federal laws making marijuana possession and sale illegal? What the policy issues surrounding marijuana, including questions involving health issues, criminal justice issues, business and banking issues and more. Students in this seminar have an opportunity to explore these kinds of questions in depth in a substantial paper that each student writes and presents to the class.

LAW 619. International Criminal Law. 2-3 Units.

Students study International Criminal Law with an emphasis on international crimes generally associated with armed conflicts. The primary crimes studied are violations of the laws and customs of war, crimes against humanity, and genocide. The course includes historical background on the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals of post-World War II and a study of the current tribunals for adjudicating these crimes, with a particular focus on the jurisprudence of the ad hoc tribunals created by the United Nations for crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia and in Rwanda. The topics covered include the jurisdiction of the international tribunals; substantive crimes; theories of responsibility; defenses; the blending of civil law and common law legal systems; the impact of an international setting on criminal procedure issues; and the multiple forums in which international crimes are adjudicated. There will be a writing requirement for the course in the form of either a paper and/or a take-home exam.

LAW 620. International Environmental Law. 3 Units.

This course examines national, regional, and international efforts to protect the global environment, prevent transfrontier pollution, and provide for the safe transfer of hazardous substances and technologies. Particular attention is devoted to legal problems raised by attempts not only to prevent, but also to mitigate and repair (or compensate for), harm to specific resources or the environment.

LAW 621. International Water Resources Law Seminar. 3 Units.

This seminar focuses on the theoretical bases and practical application of the law governing international fresh water resources. Students study the principal cases and controversies in the field and analyze the most ¬significant global and regional instruments. Enrollment limit.

LAW 624. Legal Spanish for U.S. Lawyers. 2 Units.

This course prepares bilingual students and students who are proficient in Spanish, to represent Spanish speaking clients in the U.S. legal system, or to work in Spanish on matters involving U.S.-Latin American relations. The course introduces students to important vocabulary and emphasize skills in areas of law most likely to require lawyering in Spanish. The course also includes discussion of topics important to cross-cultural lawyering, including the use of interpreters by U.S. lawyers and the courts. (P/F or Graded) (Simulation).

LAW 625. International Business Transactions. 3 Units.

This course focuses on problems faced by the international capital market and multinational corporation, including difficulties faced in dealing with several, sometimes conflicting, national and international regulatory bodies designed to control or encourage economic development, protect investors and consumers, and allocate foreign exchange; and corporate legal techniques of foreign operation and financing. (Practicum).

LAW 630. International Banking. 2 Units.

This course is an introduction to the structure and ¬regulation of the international banking system. Topics include: the role and authority of pertinent U.S., non-U.S., and international regulators; methods of entry into U.S. and non-U.S. banking markets; types and regulation of international banking activities; risk analysis; less-developed-country lending; conflicts of public policy; foreign bank secrecy.

LAW 631. International Negotiations. 2 Units.

In this course, students will explore how international agreements are made. In tandem with a review of the law of treaties, historical case studies, and cutting-edge negotiation theory, students will participate in simulations of transnational negotiations. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 635. Transnational Litigation. 3 Units.

Students study procedural aspects of private transnational litigation in the U.S. and Europe, including jurisdiction, service of process, taking of evidence, interim measures of protection and enforcement of judgments. Also covered are: choice of law, sovereign immunity and a survey of the rules governing international ¬arbitration and enforcement of arbitration awards.

LAW 647. International Economic Law. 2 Units.

This course serves as a broad introduction to the legal aspects of international economic relations and global economic governance, with a focus on trade and investment. The course will look at sources of international economic law, and also international actors and international financial institutions in this regime. It will additionally consider the law relating to the International circulation of goods, services and factors of production, to the protection of international investment, as well as the role of supranational institutions (WTO/ICSID) in the area of trade and investment dispute resolution.

LAW 650. European Union Law. 1-3 Units.

This course is an introductory study and analysis of substantive EC law within the framework of an understanding of the complex socio-economic and political environment within which the Treaty of Rome is implemented, starting with the reasons for the formation of the EC and the institutions of the EC, including: free movement of goods, internal taxation, quantitative restrictions, competition law, free movement of capital, services and people. The course also covers EC external relations with several countries or groups of countries.

LAW 654. European Union Law for International Business. 1 Unit.

This course provides a general introduction to EU law, in the context of how businesses typically enter the EU market. The course concentrates on key matters that international business partners will face entering the EU market and the discussion will focus on selling goods to an EU buyer, e-commerce activities aiming at the EU market, sales via an EU representative, entering the EU market via franchising arrangements, establishing a permanent presence in the EU, and related matters. This is a problem based course and students will work collaboratively to resolve challenging case studies.

LAW 680. International Intellectual Property. 1-3 Units.

Trademarks, copyrights, patents and trade secrets will be reviewed by a survey of certain aspects of select international treaties. The course has a strong international comparative law component with a Pacific Rim or European Union focus.

LAW 688. Internship. 12 Units.

This course is used for candidates who are placed in a law firm for an internship. Students will earn 12 units of credit. Interns are expected to be fully integrated into the daily work of the host firm. Among the tasks normally assigned to interns are research, preparation and review of documents, client interviews, negotiations, and observing court appearances. This course is designed for LLM students only.

LAW 689. International Investor - State Arbitration. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to international investment treaty law and arbitration. Topics covered include jurisdictional issues of qualifying investment and nationality, the distinction between treaty and contract claims, the relationship between parallel proceedings in domestic and international fora, the appointment of arbitrators, interim measures of protection, transparency of arbitral proceedings, the application of substantive protection such as standards of nondiscriminatory treatment, fair and equitable treatment, observance of undertakings, and protection against unlawful expropriation, host state defenses such as necessity and countermeasures, issues of corruption and illegality, theories of the calculation of damages, and enforceability of awards against states. (Practicum).

LAW 690. Special Topics- International. 1-3 Units.

LAW 690A. European Law In Practice. 1 Unit.

Students will learn about law practice in Europe through observation and instruction. This seminar consists of a two-day boot camp, placement in an internship in a European law firm, company, or legal institution for five weeks prior to the Salzburg Summer Program, and weekly online or telephonic conferences during the course of the internship. Students will be required to keep a reflective journal and write periodic reflective essays. The Associate Dean for Experiential Learning and the Director of Graduate and International Programs will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student's registration.

LAW 690B. Hot Topics in European and International Company Law. 1 Unit.

After providing a general introduction to comparative company law and its challenges, the course will deal with conceptual differences between common law and civil law rules on companies regarding source, form, style and substance. The special part of the lecture will focus on: - Brexit and its consequences for EU/International company law - Corporate social responsibility (liability, reporting) - M&A (creditor protection, cross-border conversion) - Shareholders liability (e. g. liability for a delayed insolvency request) - Directors‘ duties (codification of the business judgment rule, compliance in the field of data protection, employee protection for managers, D&O insurance) - Equity-replacing shareholder loans The course will highlight possible consequences for US enterprises doing business with European partners. (Practicum).

LAW 692. Freedom of Expression in Europe and the United States. 1 Unit.

This course considers issues of free expression arising in Europe and the United States, particularly with regard to government regulation of speech and of the press. Most of the attention will be directed to the European Court of Human Rights that explain and apply Article 10 of the European Convention. There will be a focus on the doctrines as to which of the two systems have taken divergent paths, such as in dealing with "hate speech" and defamation.

LAW 694. International Dispute Resolution. 1 Unit.

This course surveys the wide variety of process choices in international dispute resolution. It will include a comparison between civil and common law judicial procedure and of alternative dispute resolution methods such as international arbitration and mediation. The course will examine the legal, policy, ethical, and jurisprudential issues associated with these processes. It will also address the negotiation and drafting of choice of law and choice of forum clauses, as well as of arbitration agreements. The course will be taught through case law, descriptive readings, simulation exercises, and discussion.

LAW 699. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

Special Topic Courses in LAW.

LAW 699A. California Craft Beer Law. 2 Units.

In this course, you will learn the constitutional, statutory, and regulatory framework that controls and impacts California craft breweries on a daily basis. Topics we will cover include the historical bases for alcohol regulation, the three-tier system, licensing and regulation, ABC enforcement procedures, and various compliance requirements. We will also lightly touch on various legal disciplines that impact craft-breweries, including entity formation and intellectual property (trademarks). This course will introduce you to the roles lawyers play in counseling and representing California craft breweries. This course will also familiarize you with the surprisingly wide spectrum of legal issues that attorneys representing California craft breweries must be familiar with to competently perform their work.

LAW 699C. Leading in the Law. 1 Unit.

Recent research shows that being a great lawyer is more than rote knowledge, technical skills, and intelligence in an IQ sense. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Emotional Intelligence (EI) theories and concepts to increase knowledge of the topic and to provide applicable tools for skill building in the realms of peak performance, stress management, intrapersonal and interpersonal awareness, resilience / adaptability. EI is defined as an ability to recognize and effectively manage emotions in ourselves and with others. The course begins with taking the ESCI-U, a scientifically validated and widely used EI assessment. The information obtained will be grouped into a class-wide data set (no individual information will be shared) to inform the goals and areas of emphasis for the class. The course mixes didactic and experiential components providing an overview of various models of EI, performance enhancement skills, recent research findings in mindfulness, performance, and the brain, and insights on practical application of EI skills to lawyering success. Enrolled students will be assessed a $55 fee for the Emotional and Social Intelligence Competency Inventory (ESCI-U) that will be used as part of this course to provide feedback on your emotional intelligence.

LAW 699E. Civ Rights Hist for Mod Lawyer. 2 Units.

Students learn about historic civil rights issues, laws and court decisions that have shaped the modern landscape of civil rights law, and they apply the laws and decisions to contemporary issues, which may include the operation of the criminal justice system, employment, voting, housing, and education.

LAW 699F. Cybersecurity Law & Policy. 1 Unit.

This course will provide students exposure to the current key legal and policy issues related to cybersecurity, including the legal authorities and obligations of both the government and the private sector with respect to protecting computer systems and networks, as well as the national security aspects of the cyber domain including authorities related to offensive activities in cyberspace. This course will include a survey of federal laws, executive orders, regulations and cases related to surveillance, cyber intrusions by both private and nation-state actors, data breaches, and privacy and civil liberties matters, among other topics. The course will also explore the legislative and technology landscape in this dynamic area, and will provide students with opportunities to discuss cutting-edge issues at the intersection of law, technology and policy.

LAW 699G. Information Privacy Law. 3 Units.

This course covers the broad territory of the historical roots of privacy law in the United States, to its current place in the legal frameworks of Constitutional, contract, tort, administrative, and statutory (federal and state) law, and further to sector specific inquiries into the protections afforded health, financial, or national security related information. Specific topics include recent controversies involving domestic surveillance, social networking sites, video surveillance, DNA databases, biometric data, and online advertising. While focusing on U.S. law, the course will examine the effects of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) on U.S. businesses that reach EU citizens and must comply with the regulation. There will be a case study involving a hypothetical small U.S. business seeking advice on U.S. privacy law as well as the GDPR.

LAW 699H. Race, Mass Incarceration & Criminal Justice Reform. 2 Units.

This course explores the rise of mass incarceration between the 1970's and the 2000's, its consequences for communities of color, and the emerging strategies to move the US justice system away from its heavy reliance on incarceration. The course is broken into two parts. In the first half of the semester, we will examine the causes and dynamics of mass incarceration in America. In the second half of the course, we will look at how criminal justice can be reformed to address the current crisis of mass incarceration.

LAW 699I. Leadership and Organizations. 2 Units.

Many law students will someday lead law practices, chair bar organizations, serve on the boards of non-profit organizations, and run businesses. This course helps prepare students for responsible leadership and service in the many roles that lawyers perform both in and out of legal practice. Students are introduced to basic principles and methods of leadership and apply what they are learning to their current leadership role with a student organization at McGeorge School of Law. Students will assess their own leadership strengths and weaknesses and develop the skills and self-awareness necessary to lead ethically and effectively. Registration in this course requires concurrent service as a board member of one of McGeorge’s Registered Student Organizations or the SBA. (Practicum).

LAW 699J. Gaming Law and Regulation. 1 Unit.

This course will provide a basic working knowledge and understanding of the North American and International Gaming Industry. Our focus will be primarily on the domestic gaming industry which will include an examination of what legally constitutes an act of gambling; how tribal gaming and commercial gaming are regulated by federal and state governments; the administrative process for obtaining a privileged gaming license; technology licensing; the structuring of a business entity with consideration of gaming license requirements and investigative inquiries; the laws and regulatory agency oversight of gaming activities; public policy issues and problem gaming considerations.

LAW 699K. Law Teaching. 2 Units.

The course focuses on all aspects of designing law school courses and teaching law students, including course sequencing, classroom teaching, and designing and grading exams. The course also addresses how to develop as law teacher. Students will be taught the best practices through lectures, discussions, interactive exercises, and role-plays.

LAW 699L. Writing for Publication. 2 Units.

This course explores best practices with respect to research and writing for publication in the fields of international and comparative law. It is designed for JSD and LLM students who plan to write theses or dissertations, as well as other students interested in doing serious scholarly or policy writing.

LAW 699M. Legal English. 1 Unit.

This course prepares international students to work with English-speaking clients. The course introduces students to important grammar, legal vocabulary, and idioms often encountered when lawyering in English. Students will practice writing under timed conditions and oral presentation skills. The course also includes discussion of topics important to cross-cultural lawyering. This course is mandatory for all LL.M. non-native English speakers but can be waived for students who score high on the initial assessment. (P/F).

LAW 699N. Disability Law. 1-2 Units.

In this course, we will cover the statutes, regulations and cases that support the rights of individuals with disabilities, their families and caregivers. Since everyone with a disability is a person first, their rights impact every category of legal study and practice. Among the important legislation that we will study are the following: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA); Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA); and Federal Civil Rights Act.

LAW 702. Street Law International. 3 Units.

Law students participate in a boot camp during the first three weeks of the semester and then teach practical legal trial skills to local high school students during the last 11 weeks of the course. Legal subjects include Constitutional Law, Civil Rights Law, Criminal Law, and Trial Advocacy. With guidance from the supervising high school teacher, law students teach two weekly sessions of about one hour each at a local high school, and provide mentoring and role modeling for the high school students. Law students also coach high school students for a mock trial competition to be held at the end of the semester. Students will provide feedback via e-mail to the adjunct professor. (P/F) Enrollment limit.

LAW 703. PASS I. 2 Units.

Students in PASS I complete substantive review and extensive writing practice based on CA Bar Exam essay questions, receiving substantial individual written and oral feedback concerning critical reading skills and issue identification, answer outlining and time management, use of IRAC, and crafting effective rule statements, factual analyses, and conclusions. Students review selected areas of law commonly tested on the CA Bar and create substantive outlines to guide them through the writing exercises. CA Bar Exam procedures, standards, and techniques are explained and practiced. Required for students in Directed Study, but open to all students in their final year. Adaptibar MBE preparation software is required as course materials in PASS I and is offered at a discounted rate of $215. Students must enroll and purchase Adaptibar prior to the first day of class using the special link and instructions that will be available on the PASS I TWEN course page.

LAW 705. Introduction to Space Law. 1 Unit.

This course examines the international and domestic laws that govern the exploration and use of outer space. It will address property rights in outer space, the rescue and return of astronauts, liability for damage caused by space objects, the allotment of orbital slots, and other aspects of the legal regime governing governmental and private activities in space.

LAW 706. Persuasive Public Speaking. 2 Units.

This course introduces students to the many aspects of persuasive public speaking including content, word choice, and delivery. Students study the theory of persuasion through reference to historical and social science sources. Students develop public speaking confidence by practicing their skills and receiving constructive feedback. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 711. Practical Analysis, Strategies, & Skills (PASS) I. 3 Units.

PASS I is a three-credit course graded on a pass/fail basis in which students complete extensive writing practice based on CA Bar Exam essay questions and performance test questions, receiving instructions in and following CA Bar Exam procedures, standards, and strategies. Students also receive individualized written and oral feedback concerning critical reading skills and issue identification, answer outlining and time management, use of IRAC, answer structure and tone, and crafting effective rule statements, factual analyses and arguments, and conclusions. Students review selected areas of substantive law commonly tested on the CA Bar Exam and complete weekly MBE (multiple choice) exercises using Adaptibar review software. Required for students in Directed Study, but open to all students in their final year of law school. Adaptibar MBE preparation software is required as course materials in PASS I and is offered at a discounted rate of roughly $215. Students must purchase Adaptibar using the special link and instructions that will be available on the PASS I course TWEN page.

LAW 712. Practical Analysis, Strategies, & Skills (PASS) II. 3 Units.

PASS II is a three-credit, graded course that allows students to get a head start in reviewing three challenging bar-tested subjects: Civil Procedure, Property, and Contracts. PASS II is a “flipped” class, meaning that students review substantive law and lectures outside of class, spending class time primarily engaging in essay and MBE simulations. Themis Bar Review provides an online platform for course content and assessments, but students wishing to take PASS II may be enrolled in any commercial review course. There is a $150 course materials fee that will be charged upon enrollment in PASS II.

LAW 713. Persuasive Analysis, Strategies and Skills II. 1 Unit.

The PASS II course allows students to learn and practice the specific skills necessary to write performance tests successfully on the CA Bar Exam. Substantial individual written and oral feedback is provided to students concerning critical reading skills, answer outlining and time management, answer structure and tone, and effective analytical and persuasive use of provided facts and law. CA Bar Exam procedures, standards, and techniques are explained and practiced. Prerequisite: Completion of LAW 703 PASS I.

LAW 723. PASS III. 3 Units.

PASS III is a three-credit, graded course that provides a head start on becoming reacquainted with three bar-tested subjects: Property, Civil Procedure, and Contracts, and will further hone bar essay writing and multiple choice skills. This course partners with Themis Bar Review to provide an online platform for course content and assessments. There is a $150 course materials fee that will be charged upon enrollment in PASS III.

LAW 745. Elder Law and Social Policy. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the broad range of legal and policy issues and options affecting older persons. Topics covered include the demographics of aging; special ethical issues when representing the elderly; Social Security, SSI, Veteran's benefits and private retirement income plans; financing health care through Medicare, Medi-Cal and the VA; housing options and long term care; the definition of legal incapacity and planning for incapacity; end of life decision making; and elder abuse. Students join UCD Medical students for joint, interdisciplinary classes. (Practicum).

LAW 747. Elder & Health Law Clinic. 1-3 Units.

This course is offered in conjunction with Elder Law and Social Policy and is designed to help students integrate legal theory, practice skills, and professionalism in the growing field of law, aging, and the representation of vulnerable populations. In addition, students will be working to remedy the legal needs of persons experiencing homelessness as part of a Medical Legal Partnership with local primary and behavioral health clinics. Students undertake representation of the elderly ad homeless in the greater Sacramento area, including elder abuse, housing, consumer matters, Medicare and health access issues, public benefits, advanced health care directives, powers of attorney, simple wills and estate planning, and alternatives to conservatorships, criminal record expungement, child support modification. Students interview and counsel clients, conduct factual investigation and legal research, develop case theories and strategies, manage case files, draft documents negotiate and present or defend client's cases in court. 150 hours per semester of clinical work is required, of which 30 hours are allocated to the instructional portion. Students may participate for more than one semester. These returning students have the option of enrolling for 3 credits (150 hours), 2 credits (100 hours) or 1 credit (50 hours). Admission into the Elder & Health Law Clinic is by an application process. Graded. Enrollment limit. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, Elder Law and Social Policy.

LAW 780. Sexual Orientation and Gender ID. 2 Units.

This course examines the law’s treatment of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons. Topics covered include the recognition and/or regulation of LGBT sexuality, relationships, and employment. The students undertake a substantial research and writing project. (Limited Enrollment.).

LAW 802. Negotiation and Settlements Seminar. 2 or 3 Units.

This course examines the theoretical, ethical, and practical skills essential to being an effective advocate in negotiations involving legal disputes. Students learn negotiation skills through lecture, discussion, video simulations, and extensive interactive exercises and role-plays. Students are introduced to negotiation tools and techniques that enhance negotiation success. This course helps students identify strengths and weaknesses in personal negotiating style. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 803. Advanced Legal Research - Blended. 2 Units.

This course is an in-depth examination of the principles, techniques, and sources of legal research taught via a combination of in-person class meetings and distance education. Students gain an understanding of research strategies through in-person and online lectures, readings, videos, discussions, and research exercises. Students complete multiple fact-based assignments as well as a final examination. There is ample interaction with the professor and other students both inside and outside the formal structure of the course throughout its duration, and ample assessment of student effort and learning throughout the course. Students are precluded from this course if they have taken Advanced Legal Research in a different format. (P/F) Enrollment Limit. (Practicum).

LAW 804. Criminal Pretrial Litigation. 2-3 Units.

This course includes lectures, demonstrations, and extensive student participation in all phases of criminal pretrial litigation: investigation, client and witness interviewing and preparation, case evaluation, charging decisions, discovery, pretrial hearings including grand jury and preliminary hearings, pretrial motions, plea negotiations, sentencing considerations, and ethical considerations in all phases. Students draft documents pertaining to all aspects of criminal pretrial practice. (Simulation).

LAW 807. Advanced Appellate Advocacy Seminar. 2 Units.

This course is required for students competing on Moot Court teams. It focuses on advanced theory and practice of appellate advocacy, including the appellate process, preparation of appellate briefs and presentation of oral arguments; Enrollment must be approved by course instructor and is limited. All students will prepare two appellate briefs while participating in interschool competitions. Prerequisite: Global Lawyering Skills II, unless waived by the professor.

LAW 809. Civil Pretrial Litigation. 2 Units.

This course includes lectures, demonstrations, and extensive student participation in simulations concerning all aspects of civil litigation before trial with particular emphasis on strategies for efficiently securing favorable outcomes. Areas of coverage include: early informal investigation, identifying a “theory of the case,” how case theory affects formation of a discovery plan, selecting among informal and formal discovery choices, choosing deponents, tactics of taking and defending depositions, preparing interrogatories and interrogatory responses, tactics of propounding and responding to other discovery requests, options for resolution of discovery disputes, evaluation of potential pretrial motions for full or partial summary adjudication, and pretrial submissions. Students draft documents pertaining to all aspects of civil pretrial practice. (Simulation).

LAW 812. Tiral Advocacy & Evidence Skills. 3 Units.

Trial Advocacy and Evidence Skills takes a student through the entire range of in-court trial skills: examination of witnesses, opening and closing addresses to the jury, communications techniques, handling of exhibits, jury selection, and trial strategy while simultaneously teaching them how to utilize the Federal Rules of Evidence in the courtroom setting. To supplement the basic required course in Evidence Law, this course includes analysis of evidence issues in the weekly exercises and the final trial, including online webinars by the professors to highlight rules of evidence as they arise in the trial context. The course concludes with an all-day jury trial in front of a guest judge and volunteer jurors from the community.

LAW 812L. Trial Advocacy & Evidence Skills.-Lecture. 0 Units.

Trial Advocacy and Evidence Skills takes a student through the entire range of in-court trial skills: examination of witnesses, opening and closing addresses to the jury, communications techniques, handling of exhibits, jury selection, and trial strategy while simultaneously teaching them how to utilize the Federal Rules of Evidence in the courtroom setting. To supplement the basic required course in Evidence Law, this course includes analysis of evidence issues in the weekly exercises and the final trial, including online webinars by the professors to highlight rules of evidence as they arise in the trial context. The course concludes with an all-day jury trial in front of a guest judge and volunteer jurors from the community.

LAW 815. Advanced Trial Advocacy. 3 Units.

This course consists of lecture (including frequent demonstrations), combined with weekly practice sessions, covering at an advanced level: case theory development (including discussion of integration of case theory with jury instructions), persuasive opening statements, organization and technique of direct examination, advanced techniques of cross examination, direct and cross examination of expert witnesses, closing argument using analogy and storytelling techniques, jury selection, complex topics in evidence, special exercises in communications, vocal arts, and movement. Prerequisite: LAW 812. (Simulation).

LAW 821. Taking and Defending Depositions. 2 Units.

This course provides students with the practical, hands-on experience of preparing for, taking and defending depositions. Using a realistic case file, each student learns to: understand the various roles of a deposition – use as a discovery tool, evidentiary support for motions and impeachment at trial; prepare for the deposition including preparing the deponent; create an outline of a deposition; take a deposition, defend a deposition and play the role of a client or witness being deposed; and draft a file memo summarizing the deposition. Each student receives in-depth feedback from the professor. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 822. Lawmaking in California. 2 Units.

This course covers the fundamental components of the legislative process, policy and ethics including legislative procedure, bill drafting and analysis, history and intent, advocacy, relationships with the executive branch, and powers and limits of the legislative branch. Students learn about statutory and regulatory lawmaking and observe the lawmaking process in action. Students draft legislation (bills and amendments) and analyses. The making of statutory law has an increasingly critical role in our legal system. This course prepares students who want to continue their studies in the legislative arena and participate in the Legislation & Public Policy Clinic.

LAW 824. Written Discovery. 2 Units.

This course introduces students to the conceptual, legal, strategic, and practical issues relating to written discovery in civil litigation. The course also teaches students how to draft and respond to special and form interrogatories, requests for admission, and demands for production in a simulated case. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 826. Negotiating Disputes Into Deals. 2 Units.

This course focuses on creative problem-solving techniques integral to a negotiator’s toolbox, examining how to create value when negotiating common disputes. The course uses a live negotiation simulation where students can develop strategies, employ bargaining tactics, and structure agreements, tools that are applicable to a wide range of negotiation contexts. Through simulation, combined with lecture and small group exercises, students negotiate a resolution to a conflict and draft a settlement agreement. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 853. Legislative & Public Policy Clinic. 3 Units.

Students gain practical experience in researching, drafting, and pursuing adoption of California State legislative, policy, and regulatory proposals. The course examines techniques of legislative persuasion, including a blend of traditional advocacy skills and political strategy. Students will learn practical skills such as drafting support and opposition letters and bill analyses, negotiation and compromise, and persuasive speaking. Working in teams, students are responsible for identifying a client in need of a state law change, analyzing the deficiencies in current law or policy, and practice, drafting proposed statutes or regulations, refining the proposals to reflect public affairs and political realities, crafting a strategy for effectuating the change, and pursuing adoption of their final proposals in the California Legislature or an administrative agency. Activities include preparing briefing materials, presenting proposals to the appropriate governmental offices, assembling a grassroots and support coalition, seeking favorable media coverage, lobbying for change, meeting with opposing parties to discuss their concerns and negotiate changes, and participating in public hearings. The Clinic includes a weekly, two- hour seminar, where students are taught practical skills in legislative advocacy, as well as present and receive feedback on the results of their team collaborations with other students. By the end of the course, students are expected to have demonstrated competence in devising and executing a realistic strategy for passing legislation or petitioning a state government department to adopt a rule change. Admission into the year-long clinic is by an application process, and admission preference will be given to students pursuing a Capital Lawyering Concentration. Enrollment limit. Year-long (6 Graded Credits, 3 per semester).

LAW 859. Small Business Law Clinic. 3 Units.

Students will gain practical experience in client interviewing, researching, case management, document preparation and other skills necessary to represent the legal needs of small business entrepreneurs. Working with a business law firm that agrees to represent clients in a pro or low bono capacity, students will participate in a weekly seminar to discuss best practices, legal and procedural issues that arise when meeting the legal needs of small business clients. By the end of the course, students will be expected to have demonstrated competence of the basic business and transactional legal skills necessary to represent the legal needs of a small business, either in the start-up process or on-going needs. Completion of Business Associations is a pre-requisite unless waived with the approval of the professor. The clinic includes a weekly, one-hour seminar. (Limited enrollment.) Graded.

LAW 865. Immigration Clinic. 1-3 Units.

Students will provide legal assistance to low-income clients on immigration matters and direct representation in adjustment of status & naturalization matters, such as family petitions, U Visas and VAWA. Students learn about client counseling, case analysis, problem-solving and cross cultural competency. 150 hours per semester of clinical work is required, of which 30 hours are allocated to the instructional portion. Students may participate for more than one semester. These returning students have the option of enrolling for 3 credits (150 hours), 2 credits (100 hours) or 1 credit (50 hours). Admission into Immigration Law Clinic is by an application process. Graded. Enrollment limit. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment, in Immigration & Naturalization Law.

LAW 874. Federal Defender Clinic. 3 Units.

Students represent indigent defendants charged with misdemeanors before Federal Magistrate Judges in the first semester, under the joint supervision of a Federal Defender and McGeorge faculty. Students hone their skills in client counseling, plea negotiation, case analysis, oral and written advocacy and trial techniques. Students conduct evidentiary hearings and many conduct full jury trials. Admission into the year-long Federal Defender Clinic is by an application process. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in LAW 895. Enrollment limit.

LAW 875. Bankruptcy Clinic. 1-3 Units.

The Bankruptcy Clinic provides a practical skills experience in insolvency issues and proceedings. Students interview and counsel clients, and assist clients in all aspects of case assessment, negotiation and settlement, including representation of debtors and creditors in bankruptcy proceedings in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of California. The Bankruptcy Clinic also represents both debtors and creditors in adversary proceedings including objections to discharge and other related proceedings. The instructional portion of the clinic will focus on the substantive and procedural law of bankruptcy. 150 hours per semester of clinical work is required, of which 30 hours are allocated to the instructional portion. Students may participate for more than one semester. These returning students have the option of enrolling for 3 credits (150 hours), 2 credits (100 hours) or 1 credit (50 hours). Admission into the Bankruptcy Clinic is by an application process. Graded. Enrollment limit. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, Bankruptcy or Survey of Bankruptcy.

LAW 882. California Parole Hearings and Litigation. 2 Units.

California's parole system impacts nearly every aspect of the criminal justice system. Prosecutors, defense attorneys, legislators, Board of Parole Hearings staff, and the judiciary all encounter the parole system at some point. This practicum introduces students to California's parole system to build a fundamental understanding that will inform students' future legal professions. It addresses topics including the history of sentencing and parole in California; the statutes, regulations, and case law that govern parole consideration and release; changes to California's parole scheme that have followed California Supreme Court cases, federal court orders, and California legislation and ballot propositions; the use of habeas corpus to challenge parole denials; parole supervision; and recidivism. Guest speakers will provide practical insight into their roles in the parole process. Students will complete several short assignments to gain experiential knowledge of these topics by evaluating the legal and practical soundness of parole decisions, drafting closing arguments for parole hearings, and playing a role in a mock parole hearing.

LAW 895. Federal Pretrial/Trial Litigation Seminar. 2 Units.

This course provides the podium component of a full year Federal Defender Clinic experience. Students participate in in-depth legal and case analysis, problem-solving, advocacy training, client counseling, simulated hearings and trials based on actual case files, and the preparation of motions, briefs and case analysis memoranda. Class discussions include ethical issues encountered in criminal defense work. The focus is on criminal defense in the Federal system, including how the structure and prosecution/defense roles reflect social and political values. Students are required to stay current on criminal law procedure and sentencing issues and engage in critical thinking about both legal/case strategy and broader issues raised by the representation of indigent clients. (Enrollment limited to those enrolled in LAW 874.).

LAW 909. Prisoner Civil Rights Mediation Clinic. 3 Units.

Students co-mediate Section 1983 prisoner civil rights cases with a Federal Magistrate Judge during this year-long clinic. Under Section 1983, prisoners in state prisons have the right to file a civil rights complaint seeking relief for alleged violation of rights protected by the Constitution or created by federal statute. Students learn both the theory and practice of mediation and develop the skills necessary to serve as mediators, including conducting pre-mediation meetings with both sides. Students learn Section 1983 prisoner case law and work closely with Federal District Court personnel. Admission into the year-long Prisoner Civil Rights Mediation Clinic is by an application process, and is limited to third and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: LAW 526, LAW 802 or a non-credit basic 40-hour mediation workshop with the consent of the professor. Enrollment limit.

LAW 920. Pacific Law Review - Editors. 1-3 Units.

Editorial board members are elected by the outgoing board. Editors supervise the staff and make policy decisions concerning McGeorge Law Review publications. The Editor-in-Chief and the Chief Managing Editor receive three credits. All other Editors receive two credits. (P/F)).

LAW 921. Pacific Law Review - Staff. 1-3 Units.

Staff members are competitively selected from advanced students. Two credits are awarded on completion of a draft comment or casenote of publishable quality. One additional credit is awarded on completion of all editorial and production processes necessary for publication of a comment or casenote. The additional credit is awarded in the academic year in which the requirements for the additional credit are completed, which can be in the same year in which the initial two credits are awarded or in the following year. (P/F).

LAW 922. Pacific Legislative Law Review. 2 Units.

Students review and analyze selected California legislation. Work is performed during summer and fall. Academic credit varies. (P/F).

LAW 923. Law Review Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar is required for and limited to students selected to write a comment for the McGeorge Law Review or the Global Business and Development Journal. The seminar focuses on development and production of a law review comment including: topic selection, legal research techniques, methodological approaches, thesis development, voice and audience. Students receive instruction in editing techniques and become familiar with giving and receiving feedback on legal scholarship.

LAW 954. Externship. 3-4 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in government agencies or non-profit entities which specialize in the practice of civil law. This is an umbrella course which includes placement sites that do not easily fit into the other externship categories. Placement site and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. Current placement sites include the Yolo and San Joaquin County Counsel’s Offices, the Sacramento, Roseville and Stockton City Attorney’s Offices, California Office of Homeland Security, California Department of Education, the Pacific Justice Institute and the Pacific Legal Foundation. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 956. Externship - Judicial. 2-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work with court research attorneys or Judges at various local California Superior Courts, or such other court(s) as the Field Placement Director may approve. Placement sites (which may include Superior Court divisions with specialized jurisdictions such as probate, juvenile or family law courts) and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student's registration. (P/F).

LAW 957. Externship - Seminar. 0 Units.

Externship participants will also be required to concurrently enroll in a seminar, in which students will attend five (5) seminar meetings throughout the semester and consult with their seminar leader. Seminar-leaders may require students to keep a reflective journal or write periodic reflective essays. Additionally, seminar leaders may require a final written work product or an appropriate writing sample that is reflective of their placement.The Externship Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 958. Field Placement - Special Externship. 1-14 Units.

Students will pursue unique opportunities to gain practical experience under professional supervision in placements not otherwise available through regular field placement offerings, including distant and off-shore placements. Placements may include government agencies, nonprofit entities, and limited private placements. Private placements are limited to those areas in which students are unable to gain practical experience without receiving academic credit. Private placements have included IP, Entertainment, General Counsel, Water, and Lobbying-related placements. Requires advance approval of the Field Placement Director and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. (P/F).

LAW 961. Externship - Semester in Practice. 2-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as half-time externs (minimum of 280 hours) or full-time (minimum of 560 hours) externs during a semester under the supervision of a field placement supervisor in a court, government agency or nonprofit organization, or in a private placement. Private placements are limited to those areas in which students are unable to gain practical experience without receiving academic credit and are not otherwise available through regular field-placement offerings. Private placements have included IP, Entertainment, General Counsel, Water, and Lobbying-related placements. Students must complete pre-placement interviews with the Director of the Field Placement Program and the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs before applying to placement sites. A student’s enrollment in a half time or a full time externship must be approved by the Field Placement Director, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, and by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Half time and full time externships may have class rank requirements, and generally, are recommended only for students in the top half of their class. (Up to 7 P/F units for half-time; up to 14 P/F, or 12 P/F units and 2 graded units, for full-time).

LAW 969. Mock Trial Evidence. 1 Unit.

Enrollment limited to the members of the current Mock Trial Team. Trial Evidence will hone the skills of the Mock Trial Team in making and responding to evidentiary objections in the cauldron of the trial arena. The Fall competition cases will be used to isolate and analyze the likely issues that will arise. For those who have already taken Evidence this will be an intensive review. For those now taking Evidence, it will be an opportunity to learn Evidence law in context.

LAW 970. Mock Trial Team. 1-3 Units.

Students selected for Mock Trial teams prepare simulated civil and criminal jury trials, then compete regionally and nationally against other law school teams. Expert litigator-coaches train students during practices held several times a week. The course enhances the student's persuasion and advocacy skills and reinforces the integration of the rules of evidence into actual trial practice. (Simulation) (P/F).

LAW 980. LLM Legal Research, Writing and Analysis I. 2 Units.

This course covers the legal skills necessary for students whose first law degree is not from the U.S. to be successful in U.S. law school and in legal practice. Coverage includes U.S. legal systems, legal reasoning, and legal writing skills relevant to law school success, bar examinations, and legal practice, as well as legal research using print and electronic sources. Students will receive detailed feedback on their completed exercises to improve their analytical thinking and written expression. (LL.M. Students Only) (May be waived with permission of the Director of Graduate and International Programs.).

LAW 981. LLM Legal Research, Writing and Analysis II. 2 Units.

This course expands the coverage of the legal skills necessary for students whose first law degree is not from the U.S. to be successful in U.S. law school and in legal practice. Coverage includes U.S. legal systems, legal reasoning, and legal writing skills relevant to law school success, bar examinations, and legal practice, as well as legal research using print and electronic sources. Students will receive detailed feedback on their completed exercises to improve their analytical thinking and written expression. (LL.M. Students Only) (May be waived with permission of the Director of Graduate and International Programs). Prerequisite: LAW 980.

LAW 986. Dissertation. 12 Units.

This course is for JSD students who are completing an approved Dissertation. (12 units, graded).

LAW 989. Master's Thesis. 6 Units.

This course is for LLM students who are completing an approved Master's Thesis project. (3 units, graded).

LAW 990. Directed Research. 1-2 Units.

Students complete comprehensive individual research projects under the supervision of a faculty member resulting in a scholarly paper. Topic and unit credit must be approved in advance. (P/F).

LAW 991. Directed Research, Graduate Level. 1-2 Units.

Graduate Level Directed Research provides the opportunity for LL.M. students to engage in a comprehensive individual research project under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The work product may take the form of a scholarly paper, empirical study, analysis of topical readings, or other creative format that demonstrates in-depth legal research and original analysis. Advanced approval of the research topic and unit credit is required. A student must submit a detailed written proposal of the research topic and obtain approval from a full-time faculty member willing to supervise the student's research. The proposal and a complete "Graduate Level Directed Research Approval Form" must then be submitted for approval to the Director of Graduate & International Programs prior to end of the registration period for the term in which the student intends to enroll in Directed Research. Directed Research must be supervised throughout the semester by a full-time faculty member. Specifics regarding supervision of the course are left to the supervising faculty member, however, the general expectation is that the student will take responsibility for ensuring that an outline, drafts, and the final project are completed by the established deadlines. A student may enroll for either one or two credit units for Directed Research. A student is expected to put in at least 50 hours of work for each credit hour. If the resulting work product is a paper, as a general rule, the student should produce a paper of approximately 15 pages in length including footnotes for one unit of credit or 25 pages in length including footnotes for two units of credit. A student is not permitted to receive credit for Directed Research for a project produced for the student's employer or for any other law school course or activity.

LAW 995. Visiting Program/Off Campus. 17 Units.

This course is used to track enrollment for students taking coursework at another institution as a visiting student.

Public Policy Courses

PUB 210. Law and Policy Foundations. 3 Units.

Sets public policy making and implementation in the US system of law and democratic governance with limited comparison to legal and governance systems of other nations. Includes emphasis on roles and responsibilities of public professionals and the importance of analyses from differing perspectives. Attention to institutions and policies that effectively address value conflict, complexity and uncertainty.

PUB 211. Conflicted, Complex, Uncertain. 3 Units.

Sets public policy making and implementation in contexts of value conflicts, complexity and uncertainty especially as addressed in US democratic system of governance but also comparatively globally. Starts with structural design of the US constitution (separation of powers, federal system, and limited government). Includes analysis of major changes in structures, powers and activities with emphasis on roles and responsibilities of public professionals. Establishes importance of analyses from differing perspectives: individual/household, communities (of place or interest), firms/organizations, public agencies and public interest, including intergenerational. Introduction to tools premised on rational public policy making and implementation. Major attention to tools of analysis and instruments of action that explicitly incorporate value conflict, complexity and uncertainty.

PUB 212. Choices in Policy Design. 3 Units.

Choices of policies and design of programs are core responsibilities of any public body. How these choices are made is critical. The chosen policies and programs shape the potential to achieve desired objectives, influence whether and how a public agency interacts with other public and private sector organizations involved in the same issue, some even working toward the same goal. Very importantly, how these choices are made and the choices themselves determine the roles of citizens beyond elections and also the roles of stakeholders. This course focuses on the design elements of these choices that cross any single department, sometimes seen at the level of a whole government-a nation, state, county, city or special district. Examples include how councils, boards or commissions develop calendars of work, including enacting ordinances and regulations, adopting budgets, or managing collective bargaining. Some important designs are externally imposed on organizations, including prescriptions of constitutionally superior governments, as well as standards established by professional bodies, such as the Government Accounting Standards Board. Students in the course develop tools to strategically analyze these design choices and assess how important features of policy process can be changed. Many of the concepts and tools are also relevant to larger non-profit organizations and some are relevant to for-profit firms.

PUB 213. Enhancing Societal Capacity. 3 Units.

Enhanced societal capacity is an overarching goal of public policy. Today’s quality of life, economic competitiveness and opportunity, or use of natural resources, reflect past choices. Societal capacity to choose and to act will determine our futures and should be viewed globally. Progress here is not synonymous with “larger” or more “active” government as very important public purposes are achieved by actions which protect the liberty of or empower individuals, households, firms and communities. However, important societal purposes are achieved by public action that requires capacity derived from legal authority, technical competencies, fiscal resources, political support and networked relationships. Examination of a broad, global range of policy making and implementation tools, ranging from individual or family choice (e.g., in schools), through expertise (e.g., scientists) and a variety of techniques to learn from assessment of policy and program implementation, all analyzed from different perspectives established in PUB 211.

PUB 214. Budgets, Financial Management. 3 Units.

Develops understanding of the role budgets play in state, local, and federal governance. Examines the politics of budgeting and the process of developing capital and operating budgets. Gives students hands on experience working with core budget and other financial documents, including budget change proposals, performance measures, comprehensive annual financial reports, and public agency actuarial valuation reports. Also explores the effect economic cycles and past government and voter decisions have on modern budget options.

PUB 215. A Complex Public Policy Case. 2 Units.

Examines capacity for effective action beyond single jurisdictions or agencies. Also examines devices for joint actions across sectors, including inter-sectoral and inter-governmental, such as specific area plans, joint powers, financing districts or purposeful networks. Explicit attention is given to allocation of risks as a public policy tool, often seen in financing of large projects and programs.

PUB 219. Directed Research. 1-3 Units.

Students complete comprehensive individual research projects under the supervision of a faculty member resulting in a public policy relevant analysis. Topic, unit credit and graded or pass/fail must be approved in advance. (P/F or graded) (may be repeated).

PUB 221. Economic Concepts and Tools. 3 Units.

Develops competence in economic concepts and tools. Draws from microeconomics. Key concepts include efficiency, equity, tax incidence, opportunity cost, cost-benefit analysis and the role of incentives, marginal analysis, competition, public goods and market failure. Provides opportunity for students to discuss the effectiveness of various government programs and regulation or de-regulation strategies from an economic point of view.

PUB 222. Finance for Public Policies. 3 Units.

Develops competence to use concepts and tools of public finance common to professionals in public policy arena. Examines substantive and procedural requirements related to various forms of public agency revenue soucres in California, including taxes, assessments, fees and charges. Other topics include revenue estimation, capital facility financing, internal controls, fund accounting and public investments. Attention also paid to institutions critical to public finance.

PUB 232. Public Policy Research Tools. 3 Units.

Emphasizes importance of accurate and relevant information to sustain and advance effective public policy in support of constitutional democracy. Develops skills for use of qualitative and quantitative research methods, including construction and analyses of purposive samples, interviews and surveys. Includes techniques useful in providing information from the different perspectives introduced in PUB 211. Develops competencies in program or policy evaluation. Attention is given to unobtrusive measures found in common public policy processes and to effective presentation of results to different audiences.

PUB 233. Public Manager Analytics. 3 Units.

Introduces students to use of analytics in managing organizations and implementation of programs or policies. Provides students with a solid foundation in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics covered include: measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability and probability distributions, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, correlation, simple regression, and an introduction to multivariate regression. Develops competencies in identifying relevant analytics, collection of data including survey design, and making information usable for decision makers seeking to improve performance in achieving poilcy goals.

PUB 234. Advanced Policy Analytics. 3 Units.

Policy analysts seek to understand why public policy problems exist and what, if anything, could be done to address them. Program evaluators want to know whether and how well extant public policies/programs-designed in response to policy problems-are working. This course extends the statistical toolbox, introduced in PUB 233: Public Manager Analytics, used in policy analysis and program evaluation. By the end of the course, students should be able to estimate and interpret a variety of econometric models. Topics include: Hypothesis testing with multivariate regression, dummy variables, interaction effects, fixed effects, instrumental variables, time series, discontinuity models, and logistic regression.

PUB 241. Leaders, Organization Behavior. 3 Units.

Analysis and development of knowledge and skills relevant to strategic leadership of public organizations, including responsibilities for organization structures and their internal and external relationships; human, financial, and property resources; systems, including digital revolution dynamics; and political and symbolic roles. Explicit attention to professionally expert leadership for success in contexts characterized by conflict, complexity, and uncertainty.

PUB 242. Systemic Change. 3 Units.

Analysis and developing skills relevant to purposeful, enduring change of public policies and public institutions. Roles and strategies of policy entrepreneurs are analyzed. Actions which strengthen policies are contrasted with those which weaken them. Explicit attention not only to public executives, but also to strategies of elected officials, stakeholders, and advocacy groups. Identifying and understanding the articulation of a variety of tools, such as strategic communications or facilitated processes, as well as more specific policy tools, such as changed laws, new decision arenas, or changed financial incentives.

PUB 251. Values, Roles and Skills. 3 Units.

Importance and interrelationships in Public Administration of (1) values that are fundamental to public action and often contested as political actors interpret core values differently, (2) roles which are defined by cultures and institutions (e.g., department head, staff analyst, city manager) and (3) professional knowledge and skills which support ethical behaviors which are also effective in achieving desired public purposes. Emphasis is on constitutionally grounded search for liberty, human dignity and reasonableness under a rule of law.

PUB 252. Strategic Public Management. 4 Units.

Integration of learning from courses taken through (1) self-assessment and (2) class analyses of relevant cases of both successful and unsuccessful public professionals. A goal is targeted development of knowledge and competencies for sustained, long-term effectiveness. This is a capstone class desgined for MPA and MPP students.

PUB 261. Water Policy Choices. 3 Units.

Identifies and analyses possible changes in water policy in the next 2-5 years and beyond. Develops capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer term effects of public policy choices.

PUB 262. Health Policy Choices. 3 Units.

Identifies and analyses possible changes in health policy in the next 2-5 years and beyond. Develops capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer term effects of public policy choices.

PUB 263. Sustainability Policy Choices. 3 Units.

Identifies and analyses possible changes in sustainability policy in the next 2-5 years and beyond. Develops capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer term effects of public policy choices. Includes attention to energy, water and land uses, but also to sustainability agendas of businesses and other actors.

PUB 264. Public Reform Policy Choices. 3 Units.

Identifies and analyses possible changes in public institutions and practices in the next 2-5 years and beyond. Develops capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer term effects of public policy choices.

PUB 265. Emergency Services Policy. 3 Units.

Encompasses emergency preparedness planning, response and recovery, including natural disasters, terrorism, intelligence/information available and analyses, and counterterrorism. Attention to linkages among national, state, local and nongovernmental arenas of decision and capabilities.

PUB 266. Advanced Quantitative Tools. 3 Units.

Multivariate regression and modeling tools, including application to cases in water and health care. (prerequisites: PUB 231 and PUB 232).

PUB 267. Economics of Place, Industry. 3 Units.

Develop competence in economic concepts, theories and tools relevant to analyses of sub-national places, such as a region or watershed, including valuation of ecosystem services, and to industries, such as health care or agriculture. (prerequisites: PUB 221 and PUB 222).

PUB 268. Judicial Administration. 3 Units.

Identifies and analyses possible changes in judicial institutions and practices in the next 2-10 years. Develops capacity to analyze relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to identify promising strategies. Emphasizes skills and tools of leadership and implementation required for success in this complex context.

PUB 271. Public Policy Special Topics. 3 Units.

Topic selected by faculty member to fit curricular needs, current issues and student interest. Illustrative topics include “U.S. Social Movements and Public Policy,” “Spatial and Data Analysis,” or “The Economics of Race in the United States.”.

PUB 281. Public Finance Policy Choices. 3 Units.

Identifies and analyses current practices and possible changes in instruments and practices of public finance in the next 2-5 years and beyond. Develops competencies in use of selected instruments. The primary focus is supporting executive roles: capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer-term effects of public finance practices.

PUB 282. Public Data Policy Choices. 3 Units.

Identifies and analyses current practices and possible changes in public policies and practices concerning collection, use and access to public data in the next 2-5 years and beyond. Includes analytics of public data. Develops capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer-term effects of public policy choices regarding collection and uses of public data.

PUB 283. Public Policy Decision Tools. 3 Units.

Identifies and analyses uses of decision tools in making and implementing public policies. Develops competencies in use of selected tools. Additionally considers possible changes in use of such decision tools in the next 2-5 years and beyond. The tools considered include those which emphasize formal calculation, structured uses of science and other expertise, and procedural rules under which decisions are made. The primary focus is supporting executive roles: capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer-term effects of use of various decision tools.

PUB 284. State Government. 3 Units.

Focuses on the distinctive attributes and roles of state governments. Emphasizes understanding of the institutions and operations of state government with particular attention to effectiveness and to the roles of public professionals, including civil service careerists, public-interest advocates, political leaders and contracted service providers. Develops capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer-term effects of public policy choices.

PUB 285. Local Government. 3 Units.

Focused on the distinctive attributes and roles of local governments, including counties, cities, special districts and the variety of local public authorities. Emphasizes understanding of the institutions and operations of local governments with particular attention to effectiveness and to the roles of public professionals. Develops capacity to understand, analyze and recommend actions with sufficient understanding of relevant values, past history, competitive forces, and adaptive human behaviors to reasonably assess implementation feasibility and to identify probable longer-term effects of public policy choices.

PUB 286. Intersectoral Leadership. 3 Units.

Effective action on many important public issues requires joint or complementary action by all sectors of society and also support or acceptance by citizens. This course builds further on concepts and skills developed in core courses to deepen competencies to analyze and to act effectively in leadership roles in the most complex, uncertain and conflicted contexts. Central to success is mastering various aspects of governance, including the use of formal authority and competencies of governments, roles of nonprofits and businesses, and important public policies and cultural factors which shape possible actions. Attention to effective framing of issues, reaching public judgments and mobilizing resources.

PUB 290. Foundations of Social Policy. 3 Units.

This course explores the normative and historical development of the state’s role in providing for the social welfare of its citizens. In doing so, it examines current and past federal and state polices relating to aging, education, health, housing, and welfare, among others. In addition, some social welfare policies in other countries are investigated. Skills developed: Analytic writing, subject area knowledge, analysis of quantitative and qualitative data, and the presentation of descriptive data.

PUB 291. Externship. 3 Units.

Students will perform on-site public policy work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in government agencies, non-profit entities or for-profit firms engaged in public policy processes. Placements in for-profit firms can include consulting firms focused on public policy processes and firms directly providing services with largely public funding, such as in health care. The Field Placement Director and/or the Associate Director of the Public Policy Program will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. Placements in for-profit firms must also receive approval of the Director of the Public Policy Program. (P/F).

PUB 292. Demography. 3 Units.

Demography is the science of population characteristics, including population size, distribution, processes, and structure. This course examines the causes and consequences of population change—e.g., changes in fertility, mortality, migration, technology, lifestyle, and culture. These changes have implications for a number of social issues: hunger, the spread of illness and disease, household formation, the labor force, marriage and divorce, care for the elderly, poverty, and urbanization, among many others. The course also examines the concepts, measures, and methods used to document and project population changes over time. Skills developed: Analytic writing, subject area knowledge, analysis of quantitative and qualitative data, and the presentation of descriptive data.

PUB 293. Housing Policy. 3 Units.

This course is an exploration of housing (and by extension, community) policy in the United States. We begin by setting the context for U.S. housing by examining the social and spatial segregation of housing in the United States. We next move on to an examination of federal, state, and local housing policies affecting the production, pricing (i.e., affordability), and consumption of housing. Topics include the structure of housing and related financial markets; the economic and social bases for government intervention in these markets; and the different tools available to policymakers, including subsidies (both direct and through the tax system), regulation of financial institutions (e.g., the Community Reinvestment Act), government sponsored enterprises, zoning, and the regulation of lands and rents. Skills developed: Analytic writing, subject area knowledge, analysis of quantitative and qualitative data, and the presentation of descriptive data.

PUB 294. Poverty and Welfare Policy. 3 Units.

In this course, students will examine the nature and extent of poverty in the United States as well as become familiar with the policies and programs used to combat it. We will examine the controversies and politics surrounding theories of why people are poor, the measurement of poverty, its effects on individuals’ and families’ welfare, and the different programs used (and proposed) to provide relief. The course will primarily focus on income-assistance programs (e.g., Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Earned Income Tax Credit), but attention will also be given to anti-poverty programs more commonly associated with education, health, housing, and nutrition. Skills developed: Analytic writing, subject area knowledge, analysis of quantitative and qualitative data, and the presentation of descriptive data.