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Academic Regulations

Graduate 

Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry

Physician Assistant Studies

Gladys L. Benerd School of Education

All Graduate Programs

McGeorge School of Law

Master of Public Administration
Master of Public Policy
Master of Studies in Law

School of Engineering and Computer Science

All Graduate Programs

Professional

McGeorge School of Law

Juris Doctor
Doctor of Juridical Science
Master of Law

Undergraduate 

University College

Organizational Behavior

The Academic Regulations on this page are for the following graduate programs on the Sacramento campus.

Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry

Physician Assistant Studies

Gladys L. Benerd School of Education

All Graduate Programs

McGeorge School of Law

Master of Public Administration
Master of Public Policy
Master of Studies in Law

School of Engineering and Computer Science

All Graduate Programs

All graduate students are urged to read these general regulations carefully. Failure to be familiar with this section does not excuse a student from the obligation to comply with all the described regulations.

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this catalog, students are advised that the information contained in it is subject to change. The University reserves the right to modify or change the curriculum, admission standards, course content, degree requirements, regulations, tuition or fees at any time without prior notice. The information in this catalog is not to be regarded as creating a binding contract between the student and the school.

Classification of Graduate Students

Full: All students admitted with full graduate standing. 

Conditional Admission: Students may be admitted to some of the graduate programs on a conditional admission basis.  See the Graduate Admission section of this catalog for additional information.  

Credential: Students admitted to do post-baccalaureate work that leads toward an initial teaching credential, specialist instruction credential or services credential.

Academic Standing

All graduate students are expected to make satisfactory progress toward the academic degree for which they were admitted. Unless otherwise approved, graduate students are required to maintain a cumulative minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 to remain in good standing. Students enrolled in the Master of Physician Assistant Studies program, should refer to the program’s policies for academic standing. For all other students, academic standing is determined at the end of each term (or after completion of six units during the summer) to be one of the following:

  • good standing
  • probation
  • dismissal

Probation:

Any graduate student who has completed six (6) or more course units of study and has a Pacific cumulative GPA below 3.0 is placed on academic probation. A student must achieve a cumulative 3.0 GPA (or higher GPA if required by the program) within completion of the next nine (9) units to be removed from probation. The courses included in the 9 units must be approved by the program faculty for degree-seeking students.

A student who is removed from probation is not eligible for placement on probation a second time.

Dismissal

Students on academic probation who fail to raise their Pacific cumulative grade point average to 3.0 at the end of the probationary period (9 units) will be dismissed from their graduate program.

A dismissed student may appeal for reconsideration and possible reinstatement on probation, within the same school. Students who wish to appeal must follow procedures outlined in each program’s policy. If no program-specific procedure is outlined, students must submit a written petition to the Dean of Graduate School. Enrollment eligibility during the appeals process is determined at the program level.

A dismissed student may not enroll in any graduate program for a minimum of 12 consecutive months (waiting period). A student must reapply, meet current requirements for degree-seeking students, and be accepted by the University and the program to enroll for graduate studies following the waiting period. Schools or programs may develop additional procedures or requirements related to re-enrollment following dismissal. Some schools or programs may not permit reinstatement. Please see the appropriate school or program sections of the catalog for specific requirements.

In addition to the academic standing, other academic and non-academic reasons can result in a student's dismissal from a graduate program. Refer to the Honor Code in Tiger Lore, in addition to any program-specific guidelines.

Clinical Competency

Many of the graduate programs offered at the University include experiential coursework. Prior to taking a course that includes an experiential component; students are required to demonstrate that they have the necessary skills, aptitude and competencies to successfully complete the course. Faculty of departments that offer experiential courses have the discretion of denying enrollment in these courses to students evaluated as not possessing the necessary clinical competencies. Procedures used to assess clinical competency vary across programs. Students may obtain additional information from their Graduate Program Director.

Students who do not demonstrate adequate clinical and experiential competency can be dismissed from a degree program, regardless of academic standing.

Course Loads

Course load requirements are program-specific.  The following are guidelines for non-lockstep programs.  Course loads influences financial aid.  The following course load categories correspond to financial aid categories.

  • Full Time: 8 or more units a semester
  • Half Time: 7 to 4 units a semester
  • Less than Half Time: 3 to 1 units a semester

Students with teaching or other assistantships should check with their department for specific guidelines concerning unit requirements. Conditionally admitted students are not eligible for assistantships.

Credit Limitations

All courses countable for graduate degree credit must be either graduate-level courses (200 or 300 level) or, where allowable, advanced undergraduate courses (100 level). Students taking 100-level courses for graduate credit will be required to complete extra course assignments.

Courses not applicable to graduate degrees:

  • Lower division undergraduate courses (001-099)

  • Courses in which a grade of C- or lower were received. Courses that receive a C- or lower must be repeated

  • Courses for the improvement of English language skills of foreign students’

  • Directed teaching or prerequisite courses for directed teaching except for the Master of Education degree or the Master of Arts in Special Education degree.

  • Physical education activity courses.

  • Unclassified Status: No more than 12 units, no matter when they are earned, can be transferred from an “Unclassified” transcript into a graduate program

Double-Listed Courses

In order to differentiate graduate and undergraduate responsibilities in double-listed courses (100/200 levels), there must be sufficient differentiation between the two levels with the graduate level evidencing additional rigor as denoted by higher level student learning outcomes with corresponding assignments and grading criteria.  Graduate students must register using the 200-level course number.

Grade Point Average

The Pacific grade point average is determined by adding the total quality points and by dividing the resultant sum by the total number of quality hours. As a general rule, the ratio is based on the number of letter graded units completed.

Grading Policies

Symbols and Definitions

Graduate students are assigned grades in keeping with the following provisions.  Utilization of (+/-) is at the discretion of individual programs.

Symbol GPA Definition
A 4.0 Exemplary
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0 Satisfactory
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0 Marginal
C- 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0 Unsatisfactory
F 0.0 Failing
I Incomplete work due to extenuating and hardship circumstances which prevent the completion of the work assigned within the regular time of the term. Each incomplete grade assigned must be accompanied with a contract statement agreed to by both instructor and student as to: a) what work remains to be completed, b) how it is to be evaluated, and c) a time indicated for completion within by no later than the following deadlines: for fall semester, by July 1 following; for spring semester, by November 1 following; for summer term, by January 1 following. If work is not completed within these stipulated times, the instructor can indicate a grade in lieu of the F/NC which automatically would be imposed with failure to complete the work. All incompletes must be made up before the last day of the semester in which the student intends to graduate.
Symbol GPA Definition
N Deferred grading for thesis, dissertation or research work.
NC No credit recognition. Represents unsatisfactory work under pass/no credit option.
NG No Grade Received from the Instructor. Please contact the instructor.
P Passing work on the pass/no credit system. Approved only for certain courses and program of a college or school. Note: Research for thesis or dissertation the department may determine whether letter grades or pass/no credit grades are to be given. In seminar or comparable courses, letter grades or pass/no credit may be used.
W Authorized withdrawal from courses after the prescribed period.

Repeating of Courses and Grade Replacement Policy

For courses in which the grade earned is C- or lower, the units are counted in a student’s degree program, and -- if required for the degree -- must be repeated. Some departments or programs have established higher grading standards which must be met by students in those programs. All grades earned in courses taken as a graduate student at the University are counted in the cumulative GPA.

Only courses with grades of “C-” or lower can be repeated. Once a course is completed with a grade of C or higher, the graduate student cannot repeat that course or any prerequisites for the course. When a course is repeated, grades from both the original and repeated attempt appear in the official records and transcripts.  A course can only be repeated once. Grades are averaged when courses are repeated; thus, the Pacific grade point average does reflect the two grades averaged.

Acquisition of Graduate Credit as an Undergraduate

Undergraduate students meeting all of the following requirements may petition the Dean of the Graduate School by submitting the Application to Receive Graduate Credit as an Undergraduate Student to open a graduate transcript (i.e., receive credit in graduate-level courses toward a graduate degree) before the last day to add classes of the last semester as an undergraduate:

  • The student must be within 9 units of completing the baccalaureate degree.
  • The student must be in the last two semesters of the baccalaureate degree at University of the Pacific.
  • An Evaluation of Degree Requirements form has been submitted to the Office of the Registrar prior to the last day to add classes. This must be submitted before or with the Graduate Credit as Undergraduate application. (This serves as permission by the undergraduate advisor for the student to take graduate-level coursework.
  • The student has been accepted into a graduate or credential program.

Graduate credit can be received under the following guidelines:

  • The total number of graduate credits for the semester, including coursework completed at other schools, cannot exceed the maximum graduate course load for the department providing the graduate coursework.
  • The tuition rate for the entire semester is at the undergraduate rate.
  • No more than 12 units (16 units for student teachers) can be transferred from an undergraduate transcript into a graduate degree program.
  • Graduate credit will only be granted for graduate-level (200 numbered) courses and above.
  • Units cannot be retroactively transferred from an undergraduate transcript to a graduate program. Approvals for graduate credit must be obtained prior to the last day to add classes of the student's last semester.
  • Coursework will not count toward graduate credit if the student fails to complete the bachelor's degree by the second semester of taking graduate courses.
  • Graduate courses completed under this agreement will not be recorded by the Registrar as graduate coursework until the baccalaureate degree has been completed and matriculation into the graduate program has commenced. Grades from these courses will not be accounted in the undergraduate grade point average, unless the bachelor's degree is not completed.
  • Students who do not complete the bachelor's degree by the second term when graduate courses are taken cannot start a graduate program and cannot take additional graduate coursework until the bachelor's degree has been awarded.
  • Students bear the responsibility of assuring graduate credits earned as an undergraduate student will transfer to or be counted as post-baccalaureate units by other universities or school districts.

Students are not classified as graduate students until they register for and begin graduate courses following the receipt of their bachelor’s degree.

Transfer Credit

Coursework completed at University of the Pacific or at other regionally accredited institutions of higher education since completion of the baccalaureate can be evaluated for transfer credit work with the following restrictions:

  • Up to nine (9) semester units can be transferred at the Master's level and up to 12 semester units at the doctoral level.
  • Only courses that qualify for graduate or first-professional credit by the transferring institution can be transferred.
  • Only courses in which a grade of B or better are eligible for consideration of transfer credit.  Some departments set higher standards and there are identified by individual program catalog sections.
  • Extension courses do not qualify for transfer credit with the exception of university-approved transfer agreements.

Grade points earned in those courses are not counted in the student’s Pacific grade point average.  This process is initiated using the Degree Requirement Adjustment Form and must be approved by the Director of the Graduate Program and the Office of the Registrar.

Some programs may have more restrictive transfer credit policies.

Unclassified Graduate Students

Students may take graduate level courses as an unclassified graduate student if they meet the following:

  • Have a bachelor's degree or the equivalent from a regionally accredited institution or other international institution of acceptable standing
  • Apply using the First Time Unclassified Application and submit it to the Office of the Registrar

A maximum of 12 units (16 units for student teachers) taken as an unclassified graduate student will count toward a graduate-level program at University of the Pacific. Upon acceptance to the university, resident and transfer coursework are evaluated by school/department for applicability to degree.  Some programs/courses have restricted enrollment and are not open for enrollment for unclassified students.

Registration

Registration is the means by which an individual officially becomes a student at Pacific. Registrants are further identified by school/college of the University, degree status, classification and major.

All students must register by the last day to add or drop. Students are held accountable to complete every course for which they register. If it is necessary to add or drop a course, the student must complete the appropriate registration transaction by the last day such activity is allowed as published in the University Calendar.

After the add/drop deadline dates has passed (but prior to the end of the term) requests to add or drop courses must be made by special petition to the student’s respective school/college.

Requests to add or drop courses after the term must be made to the Academic Regulations Committee (ARC). In either case, petitions are only approved if it can be shown that the request is warranted due to some special situation or hardship. Courses approved to drop after the deadline appear on the student’s transcript with the notation “W” but do not count in the units earned or in the calculation of the grade point average.

Any petitions approved after the deadline dates are subject to a service fee. Tuition and fee refunds are based on the date a withdraw form is initiated in the Office of the Registrar.

Continuous Registration

All graduate students in graduate degree or credential programs must satisfy the Continuous Registration Policy of their respective programs from admission until all degree requirements are met or their status as a degree- or credential-seeking student is terminated. This includes students who are completing preliminary or final examinations, or presenting terminal projects.  If degree or credential requirements are completed between terms, the student must have been registered during the preceding term.

Continuous registration is intended for students who have completed all required coursework. The Continuous Registration Policy can be met by registering for GRAD 200 (through Inside Pacific) at least one semester per academic year (Fall or Spring).

There is no limit to the number of times a student can register for GRAD 200; however, Pacific’s Residency and Time Limit policies must be met.

Students enrolled in GRAD 200 may utilize library facilities, but are not entitled to:

  • the use of other University facilities,
  • receive a fellowship, assistantship, or financial aid, or
  • take course work of any kind at the University of the Pacific. 

Students should also be aware that registration in GRAD 200 may cause existing student loans to come due.

Some programs may require courses other than GRAD 200 to meet continuous registration requirements.  Please consult individual program pages for additional information.

Failure to Meet Continuous Registration Requirements

A graduate student who fails to meet the continuous registration requirements will be inactivated. Students in good academic standing who were inactivated may petition for readmission to the program by submitting a $50 reinstatement fee and the Application to Request Reinstatement to the Graduate School prior to the first day of classes.  

After 12 months or more in inactive status, students who wish to re-enter a program must complete a new application with the appropriate fees and documentation.  A decision to readmit a former student must include a statement by the admitting degree program what previously taken courses can be applied to the new program of study.

Registration - Individualized Study

To register for an Individualized Study (Independent Study course, Internships, or Practicum) students must use the Individualized Study Request form. This form is a written contract between students and faculty that specifies the nature of the work to be undertaken and the method of evaluation.  The form must have proper approval within the unit and be filed with the Office of the Registrar. An independent study course may not be taken in the same term in which a regular course in the same subject is offered.

Changing Degree Programs

If a student wishes to change a degree program, the student must submit an application for admission, pay the application fee, and comply with all admission requirements.  No more than nine (9) units of coursework taken in non-degree seeking, certificate-seeking, or previous degree-seeking status may be applied to any Master's degree and no more than 12 units may be applied to any doctoral degree.

Leave of Absence

Students experiencing life changing or catastrophic events are encouraged to request a leave of absence, especially if the Residence and Time Limits policy will be impacted.  Consideration for request submitted after the degree time limit has expired will be impacted by evidence of successful continuous progress towards the degree, programmatic changes, and faculty availability.  A student who is in good standing may petition for a leave of absence of no more than one academic year and the maximum number of Leave of Absence requests is two.  Requests for a leave of absence must be approved in advance by the faculty advisor or Program Director and the Graduate Dean.  Once the petition is approved, the registration requirement will be set aside during the period of leave.  Leaves will be granted only under conditions that require the suspension of all activities associated with pursuing the degree including use of university facilities and faculty mentoring/advice.

Counting of the time to the completion of the degree ceases when a leave of absence is granted and resumes when the student re-enrolls to continue the program.  A student who returns to the University after an approved leave of absence will not be required to submit an application for readmission.

Unapproved Leaves of Absence may result in the student being required to re-apply to their program.  International student should visit the International Programs and Services to find out how a Leave of Absence may impact their stay or re-entry into the U.S.

Requirements for the Master’s degree

In addition to the requirements above, the following requirements apply specifically to the Master's degree.

Total Units

Most Master's programs at University of the Pacific require a minimum of 30 units of approved graduate credit.

Grade Point Average

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all work taken as a graduate student, either at the University of the Pacific or any other institution.  See the Grading Policy and Academic Standing sections, in addition to program-specific guidelines.  Students enrolled in the Master of Physician Assistant Studies program, should refer to the program's GPA policies.

Exit Requirements

Comprehensive Examination/Capstone Experience/Creative Project/Thesis

Most programs have a culminating experience.  In addition to successful completion of all courses required for graduation, students may be required to pass a comprehensive examination taken during their final semester of enrollment or, if specified by the program, successfully complete a capstone experience or creative project or defend a thesis.

The thesis must be checked for plagiarism and approved by the thesis committee prior to the defense.

Students must be enrolled the semester in which these defense/final examination occurs.

(See individual program sections for more information).

Requirements for Terminal Degree Programs (Ph.D. and Ed.D)

The goal of terminal degree programs at the University of the Pacific is to provide students with a comprehensive discipline-specific knowledge base and extensive training in the methods of research/creative activity.  The programs are designed to encourage students to make contributions that advance their field of expertise.

Students are expected to demonstrate an ability to conduct independent research, and the ability to express thoughts clearly in both verbal and written and/or creative formats.  In addition to earning a terminal degree, candidates must successfully complete all requirements, demonstrate a high level of professional skill and performance in their academic work and their internship experience (if required), and submit a dissertation, acceptable to the student's committee.  Specific program requirements can be found in the appropriate sections of the catalog.

Grade Point Average

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all work taken as a graduate student, either at the University of the Pacific or any other institution.  See the Grading Policy and Academic Standing sections, in addition to program-specific guidelines.

Presentation of an acceptable Dissertation

In order to be acceptable, the doctoral dissertation must be:

  1. a significant contribution to the advancement of knowledge or
  2. a work of original and primary research.

Passing of a final oral examination

When the dissertation is completed, candidates present themselves for the final examination to an examining committee which consists of the candidate's advisor (who shall act as chair) and such other examiners as the advisor shall approve.  The examination is oral and deals intensively with the field of specialization in which the candidate's dissertation falls, though it need not be confined to the subject matter of the dissertation.  In order to be considered satisfactory, the report of the examining committee must be unanimously favorable.

(See individual program sections for more information). 

Residence and Time Limits

The period of residence involves students in a total commitment to their graduate program.

Completion of a minimum of one academic year of “residence work”: i.e., the candidate must be registered for at least 4 units per semester for two semesters. Two summer sessions of at least 4 units each are considered the equivalent of one-half year of residence.

Time Limits for Master's Degrees

The requirements for a Master's degree must be completed within fine (5) years subsequent to admission to the program.  The five-year period begins the first semester students are enrolled and is calculated from the date of degree conferral.  Credit that is more than five years old will not be counted toward a Master's degree.  Exceptions, provided the courses were completed at this university, will require strong justification in writing from the student requesting the exception as well as revalidation plan.  Written approval from the department, the Dean of the school/college at which the degree is offered, and the Graduate Dean are required.  See revalidation process below.

Time Limits for Terminal Degrees

The requirements for a terminal degree must be completed within ten years subsequent to admission to the terminal degree program.  The ten-year period begins with the first semester students are enrolled and is calculated from the date of degree conferral.  Students have a maximum of five years to advance to candidacy and a maximum of five years from candidacy to successfully defend the dissertation.  Students who exceed the candidacy deadline may request an extension.  Candidacy extensions will require strong justification in writing from the student and should be accompanied by a plan of study for timely completion of all requirements for advancing to candidacy.  The extension must be approved by the student's advisor, the Program Director, and the Graduate Dean.

Courses taken ten or more years prior to the comprehensive examination (terminal degree programs) or five or more years prior to the final examination (Masters Programs) do not apply towards the graduate degree and must be repeated or revalidated to satisfy the degree requirements.

If revalidation is requested, the faculty advisor or Program Director recommend a revalidation plan.  Revalidation will verify that the student's knowledge in a specific subject area is current and documented.  Options for course revalidation include a written examination, a 3-5 page essay, a project, a course retake, or other equally rigorous academic means appropriate to the discipline to determine the student learning outcomes have been met.

Revalidation request should be submitted on the Revalidation Request Form and accompanied by a written justification, revalidation plan, and documentation used for revalidation.  All revalidation request and plans must be approved by the student's advisor or Program Director, the School/College Dean, and the Graduate Dean.  The student's advisor/Program Director and College Dean are responsible for determining whether the student demonstrated sufficient course knowledge necessary for successful course revalidation.  Successfully revalidated courses may be included in the student's plan of study.  Failure to follow all designated requirements of the revalidation agreement may result in dismissal from the program.  Graduate students will not be permitted to submit more than 12 units of the program's courses for revalidation.  Courses beyond the 12-unit limit will need to be retaken.  Courses must have been completed at this university to be eligible for revalidation.

Individual programs may have additional residency and time limit requirements.

Thesis or Dissertation Committee

This section outlines the general requirements for thesis or dissertation committees. Units and colleges may adopt additional program-specific criteria and guidelines.

Thesis or dissertation chair: Faculty must hold a degree equivalent to the degree being sought and have demonstrated expertise to serve as a thesis or dissertation chair. Faculty members without supervisory experience must serve for at least one year as a co‐chair with an experienced advisor before they may be recommended to independently supervise thesis or dissertation research. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the college or school Dean and the Graduate Dean.

Thesis or dissertation committee: The Thesis or Dissertation Committee is composed of a Chair and a minimum of 1 (thesis) or 2 (dissertation) other committee members. The number of committee members depends on the degree objective. All members of the committee must hold degrees equivalent to the degree being sought or have demonstrated expertise. The committee member(s) may be selected from within the student’s school or college, from another school or college, or from another institution or organization with recognized expertise in the field or industry.

It is recommended that the committee be formed after a student selects a chair for their research and the faculty member agrees to chair. The student, in consultation with the chair, is responsible for contacting potential members of the committee, inviting members to serve, and completing the Masters’ Thesis Committee form or the Doctoral Dissertation Committee form. Upon the approval of thesis or dissertation advisor, department chair, and college or school dean, the form will be forwarded to the Graduate School.  Committee members from outside the University of the Pacific must be approved by the Graduate Dean.

The responsibilities of the thesis or dissertation committee members are:

  1. Providing the student with guidance in their thesis or dissertation research, 
  2. Monitoring the student’s research progress of their thesis or dissertation research, and
  3. Approving the content of the final thesis or dissertation.

In order to fulfill the above responsibilities, the committee should hold at least one meeting each semester.

Thesis and Dissertations

The Graduate School makes available to faculty and graduate degree candidates instructions for the preparation of theses and dissertations. The instructions are to be applied to all theses and dissertations submitted at University of the Pacific. Theses and dissertations must be submitted by the deadline dates published in the Academic Calendar.

Graduate programs have specific courses that must be taken for work on a thesis or dissertation.  These courses are numbered 299 (Master’s Thesis) and 399 (Dissertation), and are graded on a Pass/No Credit basis.

Commencement

Master’s degree students who are near completion of degree requirements are eligible to participate in the May commencement exercises under specific conditions. The following conditions must be met before the Graduate Dean will approve the petition.

  • A completed Petition to Participate in Graduation Ceremonies has been submitted to the Graduate School by the Spring semester deadline* for filing the Application for Graduation form. This petition must be signed by the student’s advisor and academic Dean (or Graduate Program Director if appropriate).
  • All degree requirements will be met before the end of the summer session of the same year. An approved plan of study that specifies all degree requirements will be completed in time and must be on file in the Graduate School before the Spring semester deadline for filing the Application for Graduation form.*
  • The Master's degree oral examination, which includes thesis defense or written examination (where applicable), will be successfully completed by the Spring semester deadline for Written/Oral Exam — Thesis/Dissertation Defense.**
  • The student is in good academic standing.

On a case-by-case basis, special consideration is given for international students who complete degree requirements after the Fall semester of the same calendar year. Approved CAPP Evaluations must be on file by the Spring semester deadline* and the student must state they are unable to return to campus to participate in ceremonies in the Spring following degree completion.

Doctoral degree students are ineligible to participate in graduation ceremonies until all degree requirements are met and the final dissertation has been approved by the Graduate School.  However, on a case-by-case basis, special consideration will be given for international and domestic doctoral students who will complete degree requirements by the end of the Fall semester of the same calendar year. Approved programs of study must be on file by the Spring semester deadline, and the student’s Graduate Program Director must approve of the request.

Withdrawal from a Term or the University

Students who intend to completely withdraw from a term or from the university have to initiate the process in the Office of the Registrar. The withdrawal date used by Financial Aid for Return in the return of Title IV Aid calculation and the effective date used by Student Accounts for tuition refunds are based on the date of your notification to the Office of the Registrar. If a student intends to withdraw from a semester after the last day to withdraw, it must be approved by the Academic Regulations Committee. Courses the student was registered for after the last day to drop appear on that student’s transcript with the notation “W” but do not count in the units earned or in the calculation of the grade point average. If a student only withdraws from a semester, he/she has one more semester to keep his/her continuing active status. If the student has completely withdrawn from the University, he/she must submit a new application for admission, and file a request for Petition for Reinstatement Form (with a $50 fee) available on the Office of the Registrar web site. The deadline is August 1st for Fall admission or December 1st for Spring admissions.

An official withdrawal from the University is the termination of rights and privileges offered to currently enrolled students, which include, but are not limited to, early registration.

The Academic Regulations on this page are for the following professional programs on the Sacramento campus. 

McGeorge School of Law

Juris Doctor
Doctor of Juridical Science
Master of Law

Non-discrimination Statement

McGeorge, in compliance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 (45 CFR 86), and Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, does not discriminate in the administration of any of its educational programs, admissions, scholarships, loans, or other activities or programs on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation or preference, national or ethnic origin, color, disability, marital status, age, or religious belief.

Inquiries regarding compliance with these statutes and regulations may be directed to the Office of the Dean, 3200 5th Ave., Sacramento, CA, 95817, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, in San Francisco or Washington, D.C.

Statement of Diversity & Inclusion

(Adopteby the Minority Affairs Committee, 2008-2009)

McGeorge strives to enhance the personal and professional experiences of our community by promoting:

• Respect and Awareness of individuals and diverse communities and groups;

• Education inclusive of a variety of different perspectives, experiences, intellectual interests, and worldviews;

• A Commitment to increasing diversity in the legal profession; and

• The value of Collective Action to challenge prejudice, stereotyping, and harassment.

The McGeorge commitment to diversity is an essential part of providing a high-quality education that prepares graduates for the administration of justice in a multicultural world and for professional participation in a legal community that represents the interests of a diverse society.

Code of Student Responsibility

The Code of Student Responsibility (“CoSR”) governs student behavior at all times from the time of submitting an application for admission until graduation, expulsion, voluntary withdrawal, or academic disqualification not followed by reinstatement. The CoSR is divided into four parts – Cannons of Ethics, Disciplinary Rules, Organizational Rules, and Procedural Rules. The CoSR may be found online at mcgeorge.edu/Policies_and_Handbooks.htm and printed copies are available from the Office of Student Affairs.

Student Learning Outcomes

(Approveby Faculty on February 18, 2011)

Learning outcomes are the lawyering skills that students are expected to obtain through the completion of a legal education. Consistent with ABA Standards, upon completion of a J.D. degree, graduates of the McGeorge School of Law will demonstrate mastery of the following student learning outcomes at the level needed for admission to the bar and effective and ethical participation in the legal profession as an entry-level attorney. The curriculum at McGeorge School of Law has been designed to prepare students with the key skills and competencies needed to demonstrate these learning outcomes in the legal profession.

Disabled Students Services

McGeorge makes every reasonable effort to accommodate, on a case-by-case basis, students with physical, medical, or learning disabilities. Appropriate services and modifications are worked out on a case-by-case basis. Our campus facilities are accessible to students with mobility impairments, and, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, we do not discriminate in the administration of our educational programs, admissions, scholarships, loans, or other activities or programs based on disability.

For additional information,  please review the online Policy Handbook for Students with Disabilities (available at mcgeorgeedu/Disabled_Student_Services.htm) and contact the Office of Student Affairs at sacstudentaffairs@pacific.edor 916.739.7089 with any questions or to submit your request for accommodations.

Sexual Assault & Response Policy

McGeorge is committed to the personal safety of its students and other members of its campus community and maintaining a safe and respectful environment free from sexual misconduct.  Safety education and prevention information is distributed to students during Orientation and available throughout the year through Public Safety. A detailed explanation of the support and services available to assault victims may be found in the full Sexual Assault and Response Policy Statement which is located online at mcgeorge.edu/Sexual_Assault_and_Response_Policy_Statementhtm. To report student, staff or faculty sexual misconduct, a victim or witness may contact Elisa Levy, Assistant Dean, Administration and Strategic Planning and Title IX Campus Representative at 916.739.7343, in addition to any Campus Security Authority, such as Public Safety or the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs.

Prohibited Harassment Policies & Procedures

McGeorge is committed to providing an environment free of sexual harassment and harassment because of race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, disability, marital status, sexual orientation,  age, or any other basis made unlawful by federal, state, or local law, ordinance, or regulation. This policy applies to all persons attending or involved in the operations of McGeorge. Prohibited harassment in any form, including verbal, physical, and visual conduct, threats, demands, and retaliation in unlawful and will not be tolerated. 

Substance Abuse Policies & Procedures

Students are expected to comply with federal, state, and local laws governing the possession, distribution, use, and consumption of alcohol and illicit drugs on the campus and as part of school activities both on and off the campus. A publication, “Substance Abuse Policies and Procedures,” provides further information about policies, procedures, and available drug and alcohol abuse education programs, as required by Section 1213 of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended. The publication is available online at mcgeorge.edu/Substance_Abuse_Policies_and_Procedures.htm.

Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

In compliance with the Jeanne Cleary Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, or Cleary Act, the Pacific Sacramento Campus Public Safety Department is responsible for providing the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. This report contains the three most recent calendar years of crime statistics for the campus. It includes crimes that occurred on campus, in campus housing, and on non-campus property and public property that is adjacent to campus. Also included in this report is fire safety information for on-campus housing. Hard copies of this report are available at the Public Safety Office, Human Resources Office, and Admissions Office, and an electronic version is available online at mcgeorge.edu/Documents/Policies/annualSecurityReport.pdf.

Accreditation & Memberships

McGeorge is a member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). It is fully accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA) and by the Committee of Bar Examiners of the State of California. It is also registered by the Regents of the University of the State of New York and approved for participation in veteran’s educational benefits programs. McGeorge has been awarded a Chapter of the Order of the Coif, the highest academic recognition possible for a program in legal education. All documents relating to the accreditation of McGeorge are on file in the Office of the Dean, 3200 5th Avenue, Sacramento, CA 95817, and all inquiries regarding accreditation should be directed to that office.

Additional Policies & Procedures

Please visit the website at mcgeorge.edu/Policies_and_Handbooks.htm for a consolidated listing of McGeorge’s policies and procedures, including the University Animal Policy, Unclassified Student Policies, Smoking Policy, Graduate Grading and Advancement Rules, Library Gift Policy, Privacy Policy, and others not discussed in this publication.

Student Complaint Procedure (ABA Standard 510)

Any student at the law school who wishes to bring a formal complaint to the administration regarding a significant problem that directly implicates the school’s program of legal education and its compliance with the ABA Standards, should do the following:

1. Submit the complaint in writing to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. The complaint may be sent via email, U.S. Mail, facsimile, or in person to the Office of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. There

is also a web-based form located online at mcgeorge.edu/Student_Complaint_Processhtm.

2. The complaint should describe in detail the behavior, program, process, or other matter that is at issue and should explain how the matter directly implicates the law school’s program of legal education and its compliance with a specific, identified ABA Standard(s).

3. The complaint must contain the complaining student’s name, his/her student ID#, his/her official law school email address, and his/her current mailing address.

When an administrator receives a student complaint that complies with the foregoing requirements, the following procedures shall bfollowed:

         1. The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs will acknowledge the complaint within three business days of receipt. An acknowledgment may be made by email, U.S. Mail, or by personal delivery, at the option of the Assistant Dean.

         2. Within 10 business days of acknowledgment of the complaint, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, or the Assistant Dean’s designee, shall respond to the substance of the complaint, either in writing or in person, and shall indicate what steps are being taken by the law school to address the complaint.  If further investigation is needed, the complaining student shall, upon conclusion of the investigation, be provided with a substantive response to the complaint within 10 business days after completion of the investigation.

         3. Any appeal regarding a decision on a complaint shall be brought before the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Any appeal from the decision of the Associate Dean shall be brought before the Dean of the Law School. The decision of the Dean will be final. Any appeal must be brought within 10 business days from the date of the response by the Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean.

         4. A copy of the complaint and a summary of the process and resolution of the complaint shall be kept in the office of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs for a period of eight years from the date of final resolution of the complaint.

Other Sources of Information

Students must familiarize themselves with school policies, procedures, and regulations contained on the website and in other publications which include:

  • Code of Student Responsibility
  • Grading and Advancement Rules, Regulations, and Procedures
  • Policy Handbook for Applicants and Students with Disabilities
  • Parking Regulations and Campus Security Student Handbook
  • Prohibited Harassment: Policies and Procedures
  • Student Handbook aka The Black Book
  • Substance Abuse Policies and Procedures

Copies of these publications are also available from the Student Affairs, Registrar and Financial Aid offices and on the school website.

Compliance with Federal Regulations

Non-discrimination policy: McGeorge School of Law, in compliance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 (45 CFR 86), and Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, does not discriminate in the administration of any of its educational programs, admissions, scholarships, loans, or other activities or programs on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation or preference, national or ethnic origin, color, disability, marital status, age, or religious belief.

Inquiries regarding compliance with these statutes and regulations may be directed to the Office of the Dean, 3200 Fifth Avenue, Sacramento, California 95817, (916) 739-7151, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, in San Francisco or Washington, D.C. Student records: Inquiries about the School’s compliance with student access and privacy rights regarding educational records, under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, may be directed to the Office of the Dean or to the Student and Family Educational Rights and Privacy office, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C.

Compliance with the Clery Act

In compliance with the Clery Act, formerly known as the Campus Security Act of 1990, the School of Law is responsible for disclosing to the students, faculty, and staff all crimes that have been committed on campus, non-campus buildings or property, and public property. That information is available in the Annual Security Report, in addition to the Daily Crime Log, which is available for review in the Director of Public Safety’s Office. The School of Law also gives timely warnings to the students, faculty, and staff to aid in the prevention of crime. Each year the Public Safety Department gathers and compiles crime information received from the Sacramento Police Department and Campus Security Authorities to assist in providing crime statistics to the U.S. Department of Education

Examinations and Grading

Written examinations are given at the end of each semester in most courses. The predominant form of examination calls for an essay response. Essay examination papers are generally returned to students after grades are recorded. A student who fails to take examinations in a course will receive a grade of “F” for the course unless the absence was excused in advance by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs or Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Absences are approved in cases of:

  1. Bona fide illness
  2. Emergency
  3. Personal Tragedy
  4. Religious observance
  5. Approved accommodation under ADA

If excused, the student will be permitted to take the examination at a later time. Further information regarding examinations may be found in the Grading and Advancement Committee Rules, Regulations and Procedures.

The grading system of the School of Law is as follows:

Symbol GPA Definition
A+ 4.33 Grade points per unit
A 4.00 Grade points per unit
A- 3.67 Grade points per unit
B+ 3.33 Grade points per unit
B 3.00 Grade points per unit
B- 2.67 Grade points per unit
C+ 2.33 Grade points per unit
C 2.00 Grade points per unit
C- 1.67 Grade points per unit
D+ 1.33 Grade points per unit
D 1.00 Grade points per unit
F 0.00 Grade points per unit and no unit credit

Certain courses have been designated as “honors/pass/low pass/no credit/fail.” These are designated in the course descriptions section of this catalog as “P/F.” The grade “Honors” is awarded for work performed at a superior level. The grade “Pass” is given to work performed at an acceptable level; "Low Pass" is given for work at the C or C- level; “No Credit” is given for work performed at the D+ or D level; failing work receives a grade of “F.”

Advancement Standards

The faculty has established standards for advancement in good standing or continuance on academic probation to each year of legal training.

The minimum cumulative standard for advancement to the spring semester of the first year is a 1.90 GPA. A student with a GPA between 2.18 and 2.32 at the end of any academic year other than the final year may continue enrollment on probation but in good standing under the following conditions:

  1. All probationers must meet with a designated administrator for counseling and program approval, which the administrator will finalize in consultation with the chairperson of the Grading and Advancement Committee. The approved program of study must include repetition of any required courses in which the student received a grade below a C+, unless, for clear and convincing reasons, the designated administrator determines that repetition is not necessary for successful completion of probation. Probationers are required to participate in follow-up counseling sessions as deemed appropriate, as a condition of continued enrollment.
  2. Unless grounds for exception are found by the designated administrator and the chairperson of the Grading and Advancement Committee, programs of study for 2D probationers will not exceed 13 units, 10 of which will be in required courses. For 2E and 3E probationers, a minimum of 6 units (for 2Es) and 5.5 units (for 3Es) will be in required courses.
  3. Successful completion of probation requires achievement of a cumulative GPA of 2.33 at the end of the spring semester after placement on probation or the scheduled graduation date, whichever is sooner.
  4. No student may repeat probationary status. A student who has previously been on probation and thereafter has a cumulative GPA below 2.33 at the end of an academic year is not eligible to continue.

Directed Study Program

McGeorge is committed to the success of each student. We designed the Directed Study Program to bolster a student's command of and confidence in core legal skills, with the goal of increasing success in law school and paving the way to passing the bar exam. 

Any student whose cumulative GPA, at the end of the first academic year, falls below 3.0 shall be placed in the Directed Study Program. Once placed in the Directed Study Program, a student will remain subject to its requirements.

The requirements of the Directed Study Program are as follows:

All students take Criminal Law, students in Directed Study will complete this course in the format that provides an analytical skills focus.

Students in Directed Study will be required to take Remedies during the fall or spring of their second year. Students in Directed Study with a GPA 2.5 or lower must also take Principles of Agency during the fall semester of their second year. 

Full-Time Division
First Year
LAW 115Criminal Law2-4
Second or Third Year
LAW 190Remedies and Principles of Law3
LAW 151Business Associations4
At least one of the following bar courses:
Community Property
Criminal Procedure
Wills and Trusts
Third Year
LAW 703PASS I2

 
 

Part-Time Division
First Year
LAW 115Criminal Law2-4
Second Year
Third Year
LAW 190Remedies and Principles of Law3
Third or Fourth Year, or any Summer
LAW 151Business Associations4
At least one of the following bar courses:
Community Property
Criminal Procedure
Wills and Trusts
Fourth Year
LAW 703PASS I2

Scholastic regulations detailing advancement and probationary standards are set forth in the Grading and Advancement Committee Rules. Copies of the Rules are available at the Office of Student Affairs. The faculty reserves the right to change requirements for grading, advancement, or graduation at any time without prior notice.

Attendance and Class Preparation

Regular class attendance is required. Students are expected to be prepared for all class meetings. Failure to meet minimum standards may result in a lower grade or exclusion from taking the final examination.

Involuntary Withdrawal

McGeorge School of Law may require a leave upon specified terms, terminate a student’s enrollment, or decline to award a degree if the Administration determines it is in the best interests of the law school or that a student is not qualified for admission to the legal profession because of factors other than academic standing. Determinations about academic standing are made in accordance with the Grading and Advancement Committee Rules, Regulations, and Procedures. Determinations about the occurrence of conduct described in the Code of Student Responsibility are made in accordance with the procedures of that Code.

Voluntary Withdrawal and Leave of Absence

To withdraw from enrollment at McGeorge School of Law after registration closes for an academic semester or summer term, students must complete the Withdrawal Request Form provided by the Registrar’s Office prior to the last class of the term. To request a leave of absence from the School of Law, students must (1) meet with the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs for counseling and approval and (2) if they have loans - complete exit counseling with Financial Aid. Failure to complete withdrawal procedures may result in a “W/F” notation on a student’s official transcript.

Summer Session Add/Drop

Students may not add or drop courses after the Add/Drop Deadline or after the first day of a Summer Session without approval by the Office of Student Affairs.

Inter-Division Courses and Change of Divisions

After their first-year, Full-Time Division students may enroll in Part-Time Division required classes, as space permits. Second-year Part-Time Division students who for extraordinary reasons must take a required course during the day must obtain permission from the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. Third-year and fourth-year Part-Time Division students may enroll in required daytime courses, as space permits. Students may take elective courses offered during either day or evening hours. A preference is given to Evening Division students for limited enrollment classes scheduled during evening hours.

Courses at Other Law Schools

Courses at Another ABA-Accredited Law School

Students planning to attend summer programs at other ABA-accredited law schools and have credit accepted toward their J.D. degrees should complete a Rule 902 application and submit it to Office of Student Affairs for approval.

The School will accept up to a total of six semester hours of credit earned with passing grades in elective courses (not Externships) at other ABA law schools. Grades do not count in computing a student’s McGeorge School of Law cumulative grade point average. Only courses, not grades, are recorded on a student’s McGeorge School of Law transcript.

Visiting at Another Law School

A student whose compelling personal circumstances necessitate leaving the School’s geographic area may be approved to study for one or two semesters at another ABA-accredited law school and apply the credits earned at that school toward his or her J.D. degree. A student must petition the Faculty Committee on Grading and Advancement and demonstrate that compelling personal circumstances warrant approval.

Courses to be taken at another law school must be approved in advance by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and only up to 32 semester hours earned at a passing grade level will be credited toward the J.D. degree. Grades do not count in computing a student’s McGeorge School of Law cumulative grade point average. Only courses, not grades, are recorded on a student’s McGeorge School of Law transcript. Students who take courses at other law schools must furnish the Registrar with an official transcript of that work promptly upon its completion.

Student Records

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, the School of Law has established procedures to ensure that students have access to their records, that those records are accurate, and that the privacy rights of the students are protected.

Copies of these procedures are available upon request from the Office of Student Affairs. Directory information may be released by the School of Law unless a student requests in writing that this information is kept confidential. Directory information includes a student’s name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, date and place of birth, dates of attendance, degrees, honors, and scholarships received, participation in officially-recognized activities, and previous schools attended.

Students who wish to have such information kept confidential must file a written request with the Registrar prior to the last day to register for the Fall Semester.

Inquiries regarding compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be directed to the Dean, McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, or to the Federal FERPA Office of the United States Department of Education.

Academic Honors and Awards

The Order of the Coif

The Order of the Coif is a national law school honor society founded to encourage legal scholarship and advance the ethical standards of the legal profession. Award of a chapter of The Order of the Coif signifies that a school of law maintains scholarship and academic standards of high quality. Each year, faculty members of the McGeorge School of Law chapter of The Order of the Coif elect students to membership from among those seniors whose academic records place them in the top 10% of the combined Full-Time and Part-Time Division graduating class and who has completed at least 75% of his or her law studies in graded courses.

The Order of Barristers

The Order of Barristers is a national honorary organization whose purpose is the encouragement of excellence in oral and written advocacy. Ten graduating seniors may be elected to the Order each year on the basis of performance in a combination of intramural and interscholastic moot court and trial advocacy competitions.

Traynor Society

Students whose grades during any two academic years have qualified them for the Dean’s Honor List are awarded membership in the Traynor Society. The Society is named in honor of the late Honorable Roger J. Traynor, former Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court.

Dean's Honor List

The Dean’s Honor List includes those students who achieved a grade point average for the previous academic year ending with the Spring Semester of 3.10 or higher.

Graduation Honors

Students who complete the requirements for graduation with a cumulative grade point average of 3.10 and higher will be graduated “With Distinction.” Students with a grade point average of 3.50 and higher are graduated “With Great Distinction.”

Valedictorian Awards

Valedictorian medals are presented at Commencement each year to the graduating students with the highest grade point averages in the Full-Time and Part-Time Divisions. The Late Honorable Sherrill Halbert, Senior Judge of the United States District Court, Eastern District of California, provided for these medals.

McGeorge School of Law Outstanding Scholastic Achievement Award

Upon election by the Faculty Committee on Honors and Awards, an award is presented yearly to a student in each division of the senior class in recognition of overall scholastic accomplishment.

McGeorge School of Law Outstanding Graduating Senior Awards

Nominations for this award are based on criteria which include scholastic standing, honors, and activities. Awards are made to the graduating senior from the Full-Time and the Part-Time Divisions selected by the Committee on Honors and Awards as exemplifying the highest academic and individual achievements during his or her law school career.

McGeorge School of Law Outstanding Student Achievement Awards

Outstanding Student Achievement awards are made to the senior student from the Part-Time and the Full-Time Division who has provided student leadership through student government offices and projects; McGeorge School of Law Review, or leadership in other student activities, outside activities, or work experience combined with law school study.

Outstanding Student Service Award

An award is made to the graduating senior from the Full-Time or Part-Time Division who has given most significant service to the McGeorge community in his or her senior year.

Outstanding Student Achievement in Trial Advocacy

Four awards for Outstanding Achievement in Trial Advocacy are provided from the Emil Gumpert Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Trial Advocacy presented to the University of the Pacific, McGeorge  School of Law by the American College of Trial Lawyers. Two additional awards are provided by the Consumer Attorneys of Sacramento.

Questions?

Dean of Student Affairs

p:  916.739.7089

e:  sacstudentaffairs@pacific.edu

Reservation of Right to Modify

The contents of this publication are for informational purposes only and are subject to change.

The Academic Regulations on this page is for the following undergraduate program on the Sacramento campus.

University College

Organizational Behavior

All students are urged to read these general regulations carefully. Failure to be familiar with this section does not excuse a student from the obligation to comply with all the described regulations.

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this catalog, students are advised that the information contained in it is subject to change. They should therefore consult the Registration Information section of the Office of the Registrar web page for any term to relate these regulations to calendar dates. The University reserves the right to revise its regulations and programs in accord with sound academic standards and requirements.

University of the Pacific’s Four-Year Guarantee

The purpose of the Four-Year Graduation Guarantee (“Guarantee”) is to facilitate a student's goal to graduate in four years with a Bachelors degree. To be eligible for the Guarantee, a student must satisfy each of the following conditions:

  1. Declare and be admitted to a major by the beginning of the sophomore year by filing a Change of Program form. You may change majors if, at the time you make a change, you can still meet the requirements of the new major and graduate within four calendar years.
  2. Remain in good academic standing (2.00 GPA - major and institutional) at the University.
  3. Complete 32 semester hours of units each year for four years as required by the college and major, and meet all degree progress checkpoints.
  4. Meet with your faculty advisor prior to registration each term to review your course plan and monitor progress.
  5. Register for courses within two days of the assigned early registration appointment. Enroll in available courses needed for the program of study; accept any available section that can be accommodated in your course schedule. Sole exceptions: Students who are on Study Abroad or off campus participating in a full-time co-op may require a few additional days to register.
  6. Make timely annual application for all necessary financial assistance, to avoid registration problems.
  7. Apply for graduation by the stated deadline published in the academic and/or term calendars.
  8. Monitor your own progress toward degree using the electronic degree check audit system (DegreeWorks) and ROAR (Roam On Line Articulation Reports) regarding transfer work to help you stay on track.
  9. Notify faculty advisor if unable to register for a required course needed in the major or for graduation.

•Special exclusions: Five year programs and students following individualized learning programs.

If the student satisfies all of the foregoing conditions, but is unable to graduate due to unavailability of a course, the University will offer one of the following remedies:

  1. Enable the student to graduate in four years by substituting a different course or an independent study assignment, as determined by the department and the college offering the student's major.
  2. Allow the unavailability of the course to delay the student from graduating in four years, in which case the University will waive Pacific tuition and mandatory fees in order for the student to graduate within the next academic year.

The University may choose, in its sole discretion, which of the two foregoing remedies it will offer the student under this Guarantee, and the remedy chosen by the University will be the student’s sole remedy under this Guarantee. The University is under no obligation to provide one of the foregoing remedies unless the student submits a written request for an accommodation to the Provost prior to beginning of classes in the last term of the student's four year plan.

Academic Residence Requirement

The minimum residence requirement for a bachelor’s degree program requires 32 out of the last 40 units to be earned in residence at University of the Pacific. This means once a student has reached 40 units less than what is required for his/her degree only 8 more units may be accepted from a four year accredited institution. Additional community college or four year institution courses satisfy content requirements only and do not apply to the minimum units required for the degree. Example: If 124 units are required for the degree once a student has reached 84 units, only 8 more units can transfer in (from a four year accredited institution). If 128 units are required for the degree once a student has reached 88 units, only 8 more units can transfer in.

Normally these 32 units must be taken on the Stockton campus, but study in Pacific-affiliated programs elsewhere in the United States or abroad may count toward the residency requirement if the student has taken at least 32 units on the Stockton campus at the time of graduation.

The school or college from which the student is to graduate may stipulate that the units in residence must include certain specific requirements in the major program and/or a certain minimum of units within the school or department of the major.

Academic Standing

At the end of each semester, an undergraduate or professional pharmacy student’s academic standing is designated as one of the following: good standing, good standing with warning, probation, subject to disqualification (temporary status) or disqualification. The criteria for these academic standings are based upon a combination of the cumulative Pacific GPA and the term GPA and vary according to a student’s classification. Unless admitted on probation, a student is in good standing during the first semester of attendance. Students who are subject to disqualification are reviewed by an appropriate committee and are either disqualified from further enrollment at the University or are allowed to continue for the next semester on probation. The criteria for the different academic standings are outlined below:

Good Standing:

  • term GPA of 2.00 or higher and a cumulative Pacific GPA of 2.00 or higher

Good Standing with Warning:

  • term GPA below 2.00 and a cumulative Pacific GPA of 2.00 or higher.

Probation:

If prior semester is ‘Good Standing’:

  • Freshman-Junior: term GPA is below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 2.00

If prior semester is ‘Good Standing with Warning or ‘Probation’:

  • Freshman: term GPA is below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA between 1.50 and 1.99
  • Sophomores: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA between 1.80 and 1.99
  • Juniors: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA between 1.95 and 1.99
  • All undergraduates: term GPA of 2.00 or higher and cumulative Pacific GPA below 2.00

Subject to Disqualification (temporary status):

If prior semester is ‘Good Standing’:

  • Seniors: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 2.00

If prior semester is ‘Good Standing with Warning’ or ‘Probation’:

  • Freshmen: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 1.50
  • Sophomores: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 1.80
  • Juniors: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 1.95
  • Seniors: term GPA below 2.00 and cumulative Pacific GPA below 2.00

Disqualified:

Each school determines whether a student subject to disqualification is disqualified. If not disqualified, a student subject to disqualification is placed on probation for the following term. If disqualified, a student is not allowed to register for further study at the University during a regular term while disqualified, but may attend the “open enrollment” summer sessions.

A student who has been disqualified may appeal immediately for reconsideration and possible reinstatement on probation within the same school or college or in another school or college of the University. A disqualified student who has been out of the University for one semester or more, excluding summer terms,  may apply for readmission to the University through the Office of Admission. If readmitted, such a student enters on probation and needs to make up the earlier deficiency in order to attain good academic standing.

Acquisition of Graduate Credit as an Undergraduate

Undergraduate students meeting all of the following requirements may petition the Dean of the Graduate School by submitting the Application to Receive Graduate Credit as an Undergraduate Student to open a graduate transcript (i.e., receive credit in graduate-level courses toward a graduate degree) before the last day to add classes of the last semester as an undergraduate:

  • The student must be within 9 units of completing the baccalaureate degree.
  • The student must be in the last two semesters of the baccalaureate degree at University of the Pacific.
  • An Evaluation of Degree Requirements form has been submitted to the Office of the Registrar prior to the last day to add classes. This must be submitted before or with the Graduate Credit as Undergraduate application. (This serves as permission by the undergraduate advisor for the student to take graduate-level coursework.
  • The student has been accepted into a graduate or credential program.

Graduate credit can be received under the following guidelines:

  • The total number of graduate credits for the semester, including coursework completed at other schools, cannot exceed the maximum graduate course load for the department providing the graduate coursework.
  • The tuition rate for the entire semester is at the undergraduate rate.
  • No more than 12 units (16 units for student teachers) can be transferred from an undergraduate transcript into a graduate degree program.
  • Graduate credit will only be granted for graduate-level (200 numbered) courses and above.
  • Units cannot be retroactively transferred from an undergraduate transcript to a graduate program. Approvals for graduate credit must be obtained prior to the last day to add classes of the student's last semester.
  • Coursework will not count toward graduate credit if the student fails to complete the bachelor's degree by the second semester of taking graduate courses.
  • Graduate courses completed under this agreement will not be recorded by the Registrar as graduate coursework until the baccalaureate degree has been completed and matriculation into the graduate program has commenced. Grades from these courses will not be accounted in the undergraduate grade point average, unless the bachelor's degree is not completed.
  • Students who do not complete the bachelor's degree by the second term when graduate courses are taken cannot start a graduate program and cannot take additional graduate coursework until the bachelor's degree has been awarded.
  • Students bear the responsibility of assuring graduate credits earned as an undergraduate student will transfer to or be counted as post-baccalaureate units by other universities or school districts.

Students are not classified as graduate students until they register for and begin graduate courses following the receipt of their bachelor’s degree.

Auditing a Class

Auditing of a course is an option that allows exposure to a course with no course credit awarded. To audit a course, approval must be granted by both the instructor and the chair of the department in which the course is offered via an add/drop form. Auditing is not available in participation courses such as applied music, physical education, art courses of an applied nature, etc. Students auditing a course must pay an auditing fee. Courses taken through auditing may not subsequently be converted to a course credit or grade. The student must indicate at the time of registration if they wish to audit a course, and pay the appropriate fee. An audited course and grade AU (Audit) may not be used to fulfill or waive any degree requirements.  An AW (Audit Withdrawal) grade will be assigned for withdrawals.

Cancellation

If you are a newly admitted and confirmed student and do not wish to attend Pacific for a semester and instruction has not yet begun, you must formally request a cancellation of your registration from the university. To cancel your registration (prior to the start of the term) contact the Office of Admission. If you are a continuing student and need to drop your last class after the add/drop deadline you must visit the Office of the Registrar and obtain a date of notification recorded on the Withdrawal form. The notification date is your official withdrawal date used by Financial Aid in the Return of Title IV Aid calculation and the effective date used by Student Accounts for tuition refunds.

Catalog Expiration and Requirements Policy

The catalog lists requirements for active degrees offered by the university. Each catalog goes into effect at the beginning of the fall term the academic year of issue. It expires at the end of summer session the seventh academic year after publication for students maintaining attendance. Advisors and other university employees are available to help, but students have final responsibility for satisfying degree requirements for graduation.

Students are held to program requirements (general education and major/minor) in effect at the time of first enrollment. Students who change their program/major are held to degree requirements in effect at the time of the change of program. Students may, using a Change of Program form, elect to graduate under degree requirements specified in subsequent catalogs; under no circumstances are the requirements from an earlier catalog applied.

Change of Address

All students must notify the Office of the Registrar immediately of any change in their addresses or those of their parents or guardians. The University assumes no responsibility for materials sent through the mail not received.

Change of Program Objective

A student who has been admitted to one degree program and who later desires to change to another degree, major, concentration, or subsequent catalog must submit an approved Change of Program form with the Office of the Registrar.

Class Attendance

Students are expected to attend classes regularly. Specific attendance policies are determined and provided by individual instructors in their course syllabus at the beginning of the semester.

Class Standing

Undergraduate students are designated freshmen, sophomores, juniors or seniors by the number of units which have been completed toward graduation as follows:

1 – 27.99 units designates a freshman.

28 – 55.99 units designates a sophomore.

56 – 91.99 units designates a junior.

92 – up units designates a senior.

Post Baccalaureate

Other students are classified as Undergraduate Unclassified. See the Undergraduate Unclassified section of this catalog.

Commencement

Commencement exercises to honor students who have earned baccalaureate and professional pharmacy degrees are held each year in May. Students who have earned their degrees in the previous Fall or Summer terms are welcome to participate.

Undergraduate students who have not completed all their degree requirements may participate in commencement if they have accumulated 92 units by the end of the Fall semester prior to May commencement. Students with deficiencies who plan to participate in the May commencement ceremony must apply for graduation by the April deadline.

Course Loads

Fall and Spring Semesters (Undergradaute and Professional Pharmacy students)

Full Time: 12 or more units a semester

Half Time: 6 -11.9 units a semester

Less than Half Time: 5.9 or less a semester

Twelve units constitute a minimum full-time program of studies during a semester for the regular undergraduate and first professional level student and is the minimum required for participation in intercollegiate activities. If a student registers for fewer than 12 units or drops below 12 units financial aid may be reduced. (Students who are less than half-time are not eligible for financial aid.)

The maximum study load during a semester for undergraduates without special permission is 18 units and 19 units for first professional level students. Students who wish to enroll for units in excess of the maximum study load must petition their school/college in advance.  Approval is based to a great extent upon the student’s past academic record and results in additional tuition charges. If a student is approved to take courses concurrently at another institution, the units at Pacific and the other institution may not exceed 18 units during Fall and Spring or 8 units during each Summer Sessions.

Minimum and maximum study loads for graduate students are defined in the Graduate Catalog.

Course Numbering System

Undergraduate Courses:

Lower Division courses. Courses, numbered 001 – 099, are primarily designed for freshmen and sophomores.

Upper Division courses. Courses, numbered 100 – 199, are typically open to students who have met the necessary prerequisites as indicated in the catalog course description. These courses are designed primarily for juniors and seniors but exceptions may be appropriate for qualified sophomores.

Graduate Courses:

Courses numbered 200 – 399 are primarily designated for graduate students. 300 and above are primarily for students admitted to a doctoral program.

Courses numbered in the 9000 series are used for specific professional development courses that are graduate level, non-degree courses in the Center for Professional and Continuing Education.

Prerequisites

Prerequisites for courses are listed in each course description; the responsibility for meeting these requirements rests on the student. The instructor, chair or dean’s office may request that a student who has not completed the prerequisites be dropped from the course.

Variable Unit Courses

Some course numbers are used to describe specific types of courses, as follows:

  • 087/187/287 – Internship study. Work experience conducted off campus, under the supervision of a non-full time Pacific faculty member.
  • 089/189/289 – Practicum. Work experience conducted on campus, under the direction of a faculty member.
  • 092/192/292 – Cooperative education. Work experience on a full-time or part-time basis. The Cooperative Education Program in each school or college differs in unit allowance. See the appropriate school for unit specifics in the general catalog.
  • 093/193/293/393 – Special Topics. Departments may offer, on occasion, special topic courses. Courses may reflect the current research of the instructor or the needs and interests of a group of students. Detailed descriptions can be obtained from the chair in which the courses are being offered.
  • 191/291/391 – Independent Study
  • 195/295/395 – Seminar. Undergraduate/Graduate/doctoral
  • 197/297/397 – Independent Research.

Graduate/Doctoral

  • 299 – Master’s Thesis
  • 399 – Doctoral Dissertation

Note: These numbering standards are general standards and reflect current practice among most units. Some units may have exceptions to these. Students should check for these within their majors for individual unit standards that may differ from these general numbering standards.

Credit by Examination

An undergraduate student in good standing and currently enrolled for four or more units may “challenge” by examination certain courses offered in the current term by the University. Departments have the right to designate which of their courses are appropriate for credit by examination. This policy is subject to the following restrictions:

  1. A student may challenge a course covering material in which, because of independent study since high school graduation, or because of work at another college or university which was not accepted for transfer credit, the student feels prepared. It is the responsibility of the student to explain how the material was mastered.
  2. A student who wishes to challenge a course should not expect the instructor of the course to provide assistance beyond an explanation of the scope of the examination.
  3. A student who wishes to challenge a course may not attend the class meetings of the course.
  4. A student may not receive credit by examination in the semester in which the student intends to receive his or her baccalaureate degree.
  5. A student may not get credit by examination for a course which the student has already audited or failed with a grade of F or NC.
  6. A student may not get credit by examination for a course in a structured sequence if the student has received credit for a higher level course in the sequence.
  7. Credit earned by a challenge examination may not be used to meet the University residency requirement.

A student pursues the credit by examination option must obtain a Credit by Examination form from the Office of the Registrar and pay the scheduled $50.00 service fee (non-refundable).

Successful completion of the examination is then recorded on the transcript with a grade of pass and is made a part of the student’s academic record in the term in which the examination is requested. Students who pass the exam are charged an additional $200.00 for the course credit. Such credit is not considered to generate an overload.

Credit Limitations

Undergraduate students can apply a combined total of eight units of ACTY 002-049 General Activity, ACTY 050-099 - Intercollegiate Sports and THEA 005 in the Theatre Arts Department toward graduation. Up to 8 units of activity and intercollegiate sports classes may count toward the COP breadth requirement.

A total of no more than 20 units may be applied toward a degree from any or all of the following: courses taken in accredited correspondence schools, extension correspondence schools, extension courses, and/or courses taken credit by examination. None of these credits, except extension courses taken at the University, is accepted during the term in which the student is completing requirements for graduation in this University.

A total of no more than 30 units of coursework in business administration may be applied toward a degree, except in the case of students majoring in business administration.

A total of no more than 28 units may be applied towards a degree from Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), DANTES and/or CLEP tests.

Cross Listed Courses

A cross-listed course is one that carries credit in more than one department or program.

Dean’s Honor Roll

Each undergraduate student currently enrolled in the University who achieves a 3.5 grade point average or above at the close of a term in which twelve or more units of letter-graded (A through F) work have been completed is designated as being on the Dean’s Honor Roll for that term. A notation is indicated on the student’s academic record of this achievement.

Degree Types

Second Bachelor’s Degree (consecutively or concurrent):

Second Bachelor’s degrees are awarded under the following conditions:

  1. The student does complete 32 units beyond those required for the degree that has the highest credit requirement. These units must be completed in residence at Pacific.
  2. The student does complete all specific requirements of both programs (both general educations and majors).
  3. Both degrees must be completed at the same time under the same catalog requirements when earned concurrently.

Multiple Majors:

Students may obtain a baccalaureate degree with multiple majors by completing the requirements for all majors under the same catalog requirements. Majors may consist of departmental majors, interdepartmental majors or majors in different schools. Multiple majors are recorded on the student’s permanent record, but only one degree is awarded. The degree is issued by the student’s primary declared school.

Diplomas

Diplomas are not awarded at Commencement but are available approximately three to four months afterward. Diplomas are mailed to the permanent address on file. Diplomas are not issued if you have outstanding financial obligations to the University. Diplomas left unclaimed are destroyed after five years. Students must re-order and pay for new or replacement diplomas.

The student’s diploma lists the degree, the school/college, and, if applicable, major and academic honors. The official academic transcript also lists the major(s), concentration(s) minor(s) and academic honors. Graduation dates posted on the diploma coincide with the last day of the semester. Degrees are posted Fall, Spring and Summer I, II and III. The official graduation date reflects the completion of all academic requirements for the degree and not necessarily the last term of enrollment.

Enrollment Verification

Students who need enrollment verification from the Office of the Registrar must be registered in the term to be verified. Students should print enrollment verifications by logging onto insidePacific, then selecting the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) Link and print Enrollment verification. Students can also obtain their good student standing certificate here.

Final Examinations

Students are required to take all scheduled exams. Matters of grading and testing procedures are the responsibility of individual instructors. If the instructor chooses to give a final examination, it must be scheduled during the time specified by the University Registrar for the final examination for that course. No student is allowed to take a final examination before the scheduled time.

Grade Point Average

The Pacific grade point average is determined by adding the total quality points and by dividing the resultant sum by the total number of quality hours. As a general rule, the ratio is based on the number of letter graded units completed; e.g., if a student repeats a course both courses will be considered in the overall grade point average.

Grading Policies

Symbols and Definitions:

Undergraduate and first professional level students are assigned grades in keeping with the following provisions. (Grading policies for graduate students are defined in the Graduate Catalog.)

Symbol GPA Definition
A 4.0 Outstanding work, highly meritorious
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0 Very good but not outstanding
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0 Satisfactory
C- 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0 Barely passing but counts toward graduation
F 0.0 Failure. Grade count in the grade point average must be repeated with a satisfactory grade to receive credit toward graduation. Also, an F is a default grade given when an instructor does not report a grade.
AU/AW Audit/Audit Withdrawal
I Incomplete work is work not complete due to extenuating and hardship circumstances which prevent the completion of the work assigned within the regular time of the term. Each incomplete grade assigned must be accompanied with a contract statement agreed to by both instructor and student as to: a.) what work remains to be completed, b.) how it is to be evaluated, and c.) a time indicated for completion within but no later than the following deadlines: for fall semester, by July 1 following; for spring semester, by November 1 following; for summer term, by January 1 following. If work is not completed within these stipulated times, the instructor can indicate a grade in lieu of the F/NC which automatically would be imposed with failure to complete the work. All incompletes must be made up before the last day of the semester in which the student intends to graduate.
N Deferred grading
NC No credit recognition. Represents unsatisfactory work under pass/no credit option. It is not assignable in the Conservatory of Music.
NG No credit recognition. Represents unsatisfactory work under pass/no credit option. It is not assignable in the Conservatory of Music.
P Passing work on the pass/no credit system. P grade is approved only for certain courses and programs of a college or school. Beginning Fall 2016, the University requires a minimum of C- or better to pass a course with a 'Pass/No Credit Grading Option'.
W Authorized withdrawal from courses after the prescribed period.

Graduation Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees

Candidates for undergraduate degrees must adhere to all of the University’s regulations. In particular they must have:

  1. Completed the major requirements specified by the school/college/department with a minimum grade point average of 2.0. At least 16 units of the major requirements must be completed at Pacific;
  2. Completed a minimum of 30 units in general education including Pacific Seminars 1, 2 and 3 and a path of six or nine courses as specified by the school or college (transfer students should refer to the General Education section for GE requirements);
  3. Met Fundamental skills requirements;
  4. Achieved a grade point average of at least 2.0 on all letter-graded work completed at Pacific. On non-letter-graded work, the faculty will determine the equivalency;
  5. Fulfilled the minimum residence requirement of 32 out of the last 40 semester units prior to receiving the degree; and
  6. Accumulated the appropriate number of program units specified by the particular school or college.

Filing for Graduation

Application for Graduation: An  Application for Graduation must be filed with the Office of the Registrar as an indication of intent to graduate at a specific term by the April deadline. For undergraduate students, it should be filed upon completion of 92 units (senior standing) and for professional pharmacy students who expect to fulfill degree requirements during the next academic year. This allows time for a review of studies completed and to enable the students to enroll for any requirements not yet completed.

Degree Check: After a student files their Application for Graduation both the program and Office of the Registrar check for the fulfillment of course and GPA requirements, i.e. university wide, major, department, college/school, general education.

Honors at Graduation

University wide honors at graduation for undergraduates and professional pharmacy are awarded on the following criteria. The student must have completed a minimum of 54 letter-graded units at Pacific and will be based on the student’s final overall institutional (Pacific) grade point average. The requirements are: Cum Laude (honors) 3.5, Magna Cum Laude (high honors) 3.7, and Summa Cum Laude (Highest Honors) 3.9.

Because Commencement occurs prior to spring semester grading, the commencement program indicates honors as of fall semester grades. The student must have completed a minimum of 36 letter graded units at Pacific at this time. Actual honors confirmed, as shown on diplomas and transcripts, is determined once all coursework has been completed and graded.

Major

A major represents the area of study a student has chosen to pursue for a degree. Students who have not chosen a major are designated as ‘exploratory’. A student who decides to change a major or to declare one must submit an approved Change of Program form with the Office of the Registrar. Course and unit requirements for each of the majors offered are in the department’s section of the General Catalog.

Minor

A minor represents a prescribed group of courses in a subject area other than the major. A minor is not required for a degree, but may be elected to strengthen preparation in areas related to the major. To earn a minor a minimum of five courses and 20 units and a minor GPA of 2.00 is required. At least a minimum of 10 units must be taken at Pacific.  Course requirements for each of the minors offered are in the department’s section of the General Catalog. Students who wish to have a minor posted to their academic record must submit an approved Change of Program form with the Office of the Registrar.

Official Grades

Official grades are available to students via insidePacific approximately two weeks after the end of the term. Unofficial grades are available on insidePacific after the end of the faculty grade deadline. The grades posted at that time are merely an indication of grades submitted, and grades still missing. They do not show a GPA, or academic standing.

Pass/No Credit Grading System

Depending upon the regulation of a particular college or school, students may request to receive pass or no credit grades rather than the traditional letter grades. This is available to encourage enrollments in courses outside the student’s area of major or specialization and thus to help broaden the student’s general education.

Normally this freedom is limited to one course per student per term and does not include courses within a student’s major field. Students must submit an approved Add/Drop form to the Office of the Registrar prior to the add/drop deadline.  Beginning Fall 2016, the University requires a minimum grade of C- or better to pass a course with a 'Pass/No Credit Grading Option'.

Regression Rule

Students who complete coursework at an intermediate or advanced level without first completing the lower level introductory courses may not then go back and take the lower level courses for credit. This rule applies primarily to coursework in mathematics, the sciences, and foreign language. It may also apply in other departments in which there is a clear content sequence between courses.

Returning to Pacific

After Cancellation

New Students: If new students cancel their registration and wish to attend Pacific in a future term, they must submit a new application for admission. Previous admission status has no bearing on the decision for admission in the future.

Continuing Students: If continuing students cancel their registration, have been gone from the university for two or more consecutive semesters (excluding summer) and wish to attend Pacific in a future term, they must submit an Application for Return to Active Status (Re-admission), available through the Office of Admission.

After Withdrawal: If students completely withdrew from the University and wish to return in a future semester, they must submit an Application for Return to Active Status(Re-admission).

Registration

Registration is the means by which an individual officially becomes a student at Pacific. Registrants are further identified by school/college of the University, degree status, classification and major.

All students must complete registration activity by the add/drop or withdrawal dates published in the University Academic Calendar and Term Calendars.   Students are held accountable to complete every course for which they are registered.

Additional registration activity past these deadlines must be requested by the student and approved through a petition.  Petitions may include a service fee. Petitions are normally approved only if it can be shown that the request is warranted due to some special situation or hardship. Approved late withdrawals appear on the student’s transcript with the notation “W” but do not count in the units earned or in the GPA.

Registration - Individualized Study

Individualized study courses are designed for special educational needs which are not met by the available curriculum. Students must submit and approved Individualized Study Request form with the Office of the Registrar. Note: Students on academic probation may not register for Individualized Study. Unclassified students must obtain special permission from the school/college dean's office of which the course is housed.

Repetition of a Course

In order to repeat a course at the undergraduate or first professional (PharmD) level, students must have received a C- or lower the first time the class was taken. Once a course is completed (with a grade of C or higher) the student may not repeat any prerequisites for that course. The grading option, when repeating a course, must be the same as the one used originally. Any given course can be repeated one time only. Fundamental Skills courses are exempt from the one time repeat rule.

Students must have both a 2.00 cumulative Pacific GPA and a 2.00 major/minor/program Pacific GPA to graduate. Prior to Fall Semester 2015, the grades received for courses repeated were averaged. Beginning Fall Semester 2015, the best institutional grade attempted when repeating a course is used to calculate the cumulative Pacific GPA and the major/minor/program GPA. Both the initial and subsequent repeat grade will remain on the academic record.

Students may exercise their grade replacement rights up to a maximum of the first three repeated courses, while enrolled in undergraduate degree programs at Pacific.  Any additional course repeats will be 'grade averaged' for the cumulative Pacific GPA and the major/minor/program GPA.  Basic skills are exempt from the three times rule.

A student's Major/Minor/Program GPA is calculated in the following manner:

  • When multiple courses can be used to complete a particular requirement, the course with the best grade will be used in the calculation.
  • Transfer/Test articulated work will not be used in the calculation.

Additionally for Major and Minor GPA calculations:

  • Only courses currently completing the requirements up to the total number of units required for that particular major or minor are used.
  • Successfully completed major and minor courses in excess of what is required to complete it are not used in the calculation.

Transcripts

Upon request by the student to the Office of the Registrar, an official transcript of his or her academic record is issued to whomever he or she designates provided that all financial obligations to the University are in order. A service fee per transcript is charged for processing the record. Students can request a transcript online, in person or by mail.

Official transcripts from other institutions become the property of the University and are not reissued or copied for distribution to other institutions. Copies of transcripts of work completed at other institutions must be obtained from the originating institution.

Transfer College Credit Limitations

The complete Transfer Credit Policy can be found on the Office of the Registrar website.

Units are granted in chronological order of when courses were taken. The maximum number of combined units acceptable from community colleges is 70 semester units. After a student has a total of 70 units, including those from Pacific, those accepted in transfer, AP, IB, or CLEP exam scores and additional lower level military course work, no additional units can be earned and applied to the minimum units required for graduation. Once a student has reached 40 units less than what is required for his/her degree, only 8 more units may be accepted from a four year institution. Courses taken after these limits are reached do not have to be repeated at Pacific since the content of the course may fulfill a requirement, even though no units are allowed in transfer.

Courses that a student takes at other colleges or universities in programs not affiliated with Pacific are not counted in the student’s cumulative grade point average.

A current student who is working toward a degree at Pacific and who wants to take a course or courses at another college or university must obtain approval prior to enrolling in such courses. In addition, students must be approved by the deans designee of their school/college to take units at other institutions if those outside units, when combined with Pacific courses in a semester, exceed 18 units.

The Transfer Course Approval form is available on the Office of the Registrar’s web site and must be completed to obtain the necessary approval to transfer course units back to Pacific. It is the student’s responsibility to have an official transcript sent to the Office of Admission once courses are completed.

Undergraduate Unclassified Students

Undergraduate Unclassified students, who do not hold a Bachelor's degree, may complete up to 27.9 units prior to being required to formally apply for admission to the university. Upon admittance to the university, resident and transfer coursework will be evaluated.

U.S. Military Mobilization:

All students who are called to active duty must start the process by providing a copy of the military summons to the Office of the Registrar’s Veterans Affairs (VA) Coordinator, Knoles Hall, first floor, 209-946-2135. Cancellations processed during the first twelve weeks receive a 100% refund and all course sections are dropped before the student leaves for active duty. It is essential that a copy of the military summons be delivered to the Office of the Registrar before departure from campus. This ensures that classes are dropped and that grades of ‘F’ are not issued.

Students called to active duty toward the end of the semester, who are short submitting final papers or cannot take final examinations, are entitled to receive Incompletes (I) for the semester. Arrangements to receive Incompletes must be made with each instructor and copies of the military summons must be left with the Office of the Registrar. Students receiving Incompletes under these conditions are given four semesters to complete the work and remove the marks of ‘I’. If the work is not completed during this special four semester period, the marks of I are automatically converted to marks of W. If the military service period extends beyond the special four semester period, students can file an Academic Regulations Committee (ARC) petition for extension of this special incomplete time period.

Students who leave the University for U.S. military service and follow the procedures outlined above are eligible to re-enroll as returning students. Returning students must file a ‘Return to Active Status’ application with the Office of Admission. Returning students who have questions about Veterans Affairs benefits should contact the VA Coordinator in the Office of the Registrar at 209-946-2135.

Withdrawal From a Semester or the University

Students who intend to completely withdraw from a semester or from the university have to initiate the process in the Office of the Registrar. The withdrawal date used by Financial Aid for the Return of Title IV Aid calculation and the effective date used by Student Accounts for tuition refunds are based on the date of your notification to the Office of the Registrar. If a student intends to withdraw from a semester after the last day to withdraw, it must be approved by the Academic Regulations Committee. Courses the student was registered for after the last day to drop appear on that student’s transcript with the notation “W” but do not count in the units earned or in the calculation of the grade point average. If a student only withdraws from a semester, he/she has one more semester to keep his/her continuing active status. If the students has completely withdrawn from the University, he/she must file a Return to Active Status application with the Office of Admission.

An official withdrawal from the University is the termination of rights and privileges offered to currently enrolled students which includes, but not limited to, early registration.