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Master of Arts in Education

Degree Program

Master of Arts in Education

Concentration Offered

  • Organizational Learning and Effectiveness

Admissions Requirement

  1. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better for the last 60 units of college or post-baccalaureate work
  2. A Bachelor's degree from an accredited university
  3. A complete application portfolio to the Graduate School, an essay following departmental guidelines; official transcripts from all college-level coursework including official verification of the awarding of degrees; and three letters of recommendation that attests to the candidate's ability to undertake graduate studies
  4. Departmental interview, if required.
  5. Evidence of qualities and character in keeping with the philosophy and standards of this University and the School of Education

For experienced educators who desire to prepare for positions as supervisors, consultants, vice principals, principals, or district office staff, the School of Education offers programs meeting the requirements for the Preliminary and Professional Clear Administrative Services Credentials. The credential programs may be combined with the master’s degree or the doctorate in education.

Master of Arts in Education

The Master of Arts (MA) in Education requires a minimum of 32 units, of which 18 units must be in courses 200 or above and from the Benerd School of Education, with a Pacific cumulative grade point average of 3.0.  Based upon state and federal laws, additional units and requirements may be necessary for those students electing to earn a credential, certification or license along with the graduate degree (e.g., teaching credential, and administration credential).  Students interested in earning a credential, certification or license should work closely with their advisor and the credential staff.  The requirements of some concentration options may also be guided by external standards that direct completion of specified courses and achievement of specific learning outcomes.

I.  Theoretical Core:

Select one of the following:2-4
Transformational Teaching and Learning
Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Secondary Classrooms
Pluralism in American Education
Seminar: Social Class Effects in Education
Leading in Diverse Contexts
Select one of the following:2-4
Teaching and Assessment
Adolescent Development
Curriculum Theory
Nature and Conditions of Learning
Organizational Learning

II.  Field Experience and/or Research:

Select 4-6 units from the following:4-6
Research Course Options:
Techniques of Research
Statistical Thinking and Communication
Research in Second Language Acquisition
Teaching as Reflective Inquiry I
and Teaching as Reflective Inquiry II
and Teaching as Reflective Inquiry III
Action Research
Program Evaluation
Other approved research courses
Field Experience Course Options:
Professional Practice
Professional Practice Music
Leadership Integrative Capstone
Directed Teaching: Mild/Moderate
and Directed Teaching: Special Education (Mild/Moderate)
Directed Teaching: Moderate/Severe
Internship: Mild/Moderate
Internship: Moderate/Severe

Note:  1.) Students will not receive credit for EDUC 170 /EDUC 270 and EDUC 171/EDUC 271.  2.)  Students will not receive credit for SPED 198M/SPED 298M  and SPED 198S/SPED 298S.

III.  Capstone Experience

Students will be required to complete a capstone experience (e.g., oral exam, portfolio, thesis, action research project and/or written comprehensive exam).  The capstone experience will be determined within each concentration.  For students who do not elect not to earn a concentration, his or her advisor will select an appropriate capstone experience.

IV. Concentration

Students may elect to select the following concentration.  In order to earn a concentration, students must fulfill the general requirements listed above as well as specific concentration requirements listed below.

Organizational Learning and Effectiveness
EDUC 235Organizational Analysis3
EDUC 236Performance Improvement3
EDUC 237Organizational Learning3
EDUC 238Organizational Change and Consulting3

V. Of the required 32 units, a minimum of 18 units must be from the Benerd School of Education.

VI. Of the required 32 units, a minimum of 18 units must be taken at the 200 or 300 level.

Education Courses

EDUC 010. Dean's Seminar. 1 Unit.

A basic introduction to the career of teaching and the programs and methodologies of the School of Education including educational requirements, professional orientation, career opportunities and school and university regulations.

EDUC 011. Children's Literature. 3 Units.

Students examine various genres of quality literature for children from preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is on how books affect the growing child and on ways to develop children’s appreciation and comprehension of stories as well as to extend their subject matter knowledge.

EDUC 100. Introduction to Language. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the central role of language in cultures and societies. Emphasis is on social and regional language variation, language and prejudice, gender and social class differences in conversation styles, the history and evolution of languages, and societal attitudes toward language and socio-political-economic influences on language use. Students gain more precision in their academic language development as they explore English grammatical structures and develop an appreciation of the work sociolinguists do through conversational analysis. As part of the University of the Pacific's general education program (1-A), this is a library intensive course. This means that students do library research, using online and other sources to meet some of the course requirements. (GE1A)

EDUC 129. Seminar: Cultural Basis of Conflict in Education. 3 Units.

Analysis of cultural diversity in American classrooms. Not open to doctoral students. (ETHC)

EDUC 130. Technology Enhanced Learning Environments. 2 Units.

This course focuses on basic skills and software for creating multimedia projects, completing assignments in all education courses, and meeting the state’s technology standards for teachers. All assignments in this course relate to building the structure and first section of a candidate’s teacher education electronic portfolio. Thereafter, candidates add sections to the portfolio during other courses and activities in their programs of study, which includes evidence that they have met the state’s technology standards. Upon graduation, the portfolios are archived in the BSE, and candidates can create a DVD of their entire portfolio or of parts they wish to use. This course is a prerequisite to Admission to Teacher Education.

EDUC 131. First and Second Language Acquisition/Linguistic Foundations. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to first and second language development, using a compare and contrast framework. It covers theoretical perspectives in first and second language acquisition and explores the relationship between theories and practice in language learning and teaching. This course addresses pedagogical implications of various theories of second language acquisition and discusses socio-cultural factors that influence second language learning. In addition, there is particular attention given to language structure (phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax) as it relates to the language development of native speakers of English as well as English language learners. This course includes a fieldwork component for which students work with young elementary students off campus once a week during the semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 100.

EDUC 140. Transformational Teaching and Learning. 4 Units.

This is an introductory course that explores the complex relationships within and among local, state, and national levels of public instruction. The course introduces historical, legal, and social issues that affect diverse educational settings. Topics include key movements and legal cases of prominence in American education; demographic information about learners and schools in California; home, family and school partnerships; and professional stages in teaching careers (e.g., subject matter preparation, teacher education, initial licensure, induction programs, and professional development). The course also includes an introduction to “reflective practice”; an overview of stages in human development; prominent learning and motivation theories; the characteristics of learners with exceptional needs; and individual differences among learners, which include English language learners. This course is taken by students interested in Multiple Subject, Single Subject and/or Educational Specialist credentials. It is a prerequisite to Admission to Teacher Education, but it is open to all students at the University. Fieldwork requires fingerprint review and clearance at local districts and TB clearance. There are fees for these services.

EDUC 141. Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum. 2 Units.

This supervised practicum is taken concurrently with EDUC 140: Transformational Teaching and Learning. Students examine the community, school, and classroom contexts and how they influence the teaching and learning process. Translation of current learning theories into practice are analyzed and applied. Students interact with K – 12 students and teachers in public school settings.

EDUC 142. Visual Arts in Education. 3 Units.

This course assists students in developing an understanding of the visual arts and how they interface with children’s development through age 18. The course acquaints students with Visual Arts curriculum in the K-12 classroom. A philosophical emphasis is be placed upon the interface of visual arts with children’s development. The course explores such concepts and processes as aesthetic perception, creative expression, visual arts heritage and aesthetic valuing, and media and materials, suitable for children through age 18. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (GE2C)

EDUC 150. Teaching and Assessment. 4 Units.

This course supports reflective teaching and learner-centered principles and practices in the K-12 schools. The course focuses on state-adopted curriculum standards and frameworks in seven content fields, particularly on the content area of History/Social Science; approaches to classroom management; selection of curriculum materials at the state level; and evaluation. Topics include implementing appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of students with special needs and culturally diverse learners; and using developmentally appropriate diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments to plan instruction. Technology is used to enhance curriculum design and student interaction with content knowledge. This course is taken concurrently with EDUC 153, Teaching STEM, for Multiple Subject candidates. EDUC 150 is taken by Education Specialist candidates. (EDUC 153 is not taken by Special Education candidates, unless they are planning to earn a Multiple Subject Credential.) Prerequisite: EDUC 140. Fingerprint and TB test clearance is required.

EDUC 153. Teaching Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. 4 Units.

Methods and curriculum presented for teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics in self-contained classrooms. Topics include state-apopted content standards and curriculum framework; essential mathematics, technology, engineering, life, physical, and earth science themes, concepts, and skills; instructional planning and diverse and appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; principles and practices of evaluation of students' learning. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 140.

EDUC 154. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Secondary Classrooms. 2 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Prerquisites: Instructor approval or C & I department permission; minimum 2.5 GPA, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 155. Teaching in the Content Areas I. 3 Units.

This is the first of a three-part course for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. Candidates learn and apply current learning theories to planning, instruction, and assessment, focusing on the general knowledge, skills, and dispositions associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. Candidates begin to learn about specific subject matter content and pedagogy and a variety of instructional and assessment strategies to benefit all learners. The needs of all secondary school students, including English Learners, and characteristics of the school environment are emphasized for fostering effective teaching and learning.

EDUC 156. Content and Disciplinary Literacy Development in Secondary Schools. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to research-based content literacy instruction. The course focuses on preparing candidates to teach content-based reading and writing skills to a full range of students which includes struggling readers, students with special needs, and English Learners. A variety of content-based literacy strategies (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) is presented to facilitate learning in the content areas. The course meets credential requirements. Prerequisites: EDUC 140, admission to Creditial Candidacy, Instructor/Curriculum and Instruction department permission, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 157. TESOL Theory and Practice. 4 Units.

This course provides a link between theory and practice in the teaching of ESL. Aspects of language learning is discussed, and concomitant instruction and curriculum is analyzed while developing a working model for the development of curriculum that is appropriate for the teaching situation.

EDUC 160. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Classrooms. 2 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Senior standing or permission of instructor.

EDUC 161. Literacy Development (Multiple Subject). 4 Units.

This course introduces methods and curriculum for teaching reading and language arts with integration of humanities and social science for students from kindergarten to eighth grade classrooms. The course focuses on theory-based effective instruction of reading, writing, listening and speaking across the curriculum. Students learn to analyze and evaluate effective literacy skills and strategies in teaching reading, writing, listening and speaking to K-8 students, and to apply and practice these skills and strategies in various instructional settings in various content areas. Emphasis is placed on the integration of reading and language arts throughout the curriculum. Twenty-four hours of fieldwork is required. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching (Professional Practice).Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education program with fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 162. Literacy Assessment (Multiple Subject). 2 Units.

This course investigates the uses of ongoing instructional diagnostic strategies in reading and language arts that guide teaching and assessment. Topics include early intervention techniques appropriate for a classroom setting and guided practice of these techniques. Fieldwork is required and shared with EDUC 161. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching and may be taken with EDUC 161 concurrently. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education with fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 163. Teaching English Learners. 4 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English profeciency in K-8 classrooms. Teachers will develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to both the California english Language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these strategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objectives include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series fieldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequiesites: EDUC 100, 140, and 150, or instructor/C & I department permission; minimum GPA of 2.5; Finerprint and TB test clearance. (ETHC)

EDUC 164. Introduction to Bilingual Education. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of bilingual education and is designed to meet the needs of both undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in understanding the role of bilingual, bicultural education in schools. Students explore the related implications of second language acquisition research, sociopolitical theory, and historical as well as contemporary experiences in the contexts of program design, instructional practice, and school/community relations toward a conceptualization of bilingual education as a source of pedagogical enrichment strategies for all learners in all settings. Prerequisites: EDUC 100 and EDUC 131. (ETHC)

EDUC 165. Teaching in the Content Areas II. 2 Units.

This is the second of a multi-course series for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. The emphasis in this course is on content-specific practices. Candidates join their respective professional organizations and participate in those organizations’ professional development experiences. In addition to whole class meetings, candidates meet in content-specific seminars with practitioners in their content areas on a regular basis.

EDUC 166. Teaching English Learners, Single Subject. 3 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English proficiency in K-12 classrooms. Teahcers develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to the California English language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these stategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objective include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series feldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 140 or instructor/C & I department permission; minimium 2.5 GPA; Fingerprint and TB test clearance. (ETHC)

EDUC 167. Adolescent Development. 3 Units.

This course is designed for secondary preservice teachers to consider the principles of adolescent development in context. Biological, cognitive, psychological, social, and moral development are examined to determine how these developmental pathways affect student achievement, motivation, and well being. The influence of family, peers, school, and the broader community on development are explored as well. Implications of current understandings of adolescent development on teaching, learning, and assessment are emphasized. In addition to class meetings, students participate in a practicum in order to apply learning in school settings.

EDUC 168. Microcomputers in Education. 3 Units.

This course introduces the student to the major concepts and applications related to the use of microcomputers in education. Students learn basic operations, terminology and capabilities of microcomputers within an educational context. Key issues related to the use of instructional technology are discussed. Application and evaluation of software for classroom instruction and management is investigated.

EDUC 169. Microcomputers and Curriculum Design. 3 Units.

Issues related to the educational application of instructional technology and its impact on education is investigated. Students do in-depth analyses of software applications and their validity in relation to learning models and the current curriculum. Students evaluate how new technologies may effect change in curriculum. Various projects that relate to evaluation of software, teaching strategies and research in new technologies are required. Prerequisite: EDUC 168 or permission of instructor.

EDUC 170. Professional Practice. 2-10 Units.

Professional practice is a full-day of Student Teaching in public schools. Candidates for a Single Subject and Multiple Subject Preliminary teaching credential are placed in local public schools for intensive application of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for professional practice in California schools. Student Teaching is full-day teaching for a semester, and undergraduates are approved for Student Teaching. Prerequisites: EDUC 130, EDUC 140, EDUC 141, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDUC 152, EDUC 161, EDUC 162, EDUC 163, EDUC172 (concurrently); SPED 125X (concurrently) with grades of “C” or higher; a minimum GPA of 2.5.; admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; a passing score on the CBEST with subject matter completed (CSET examination or approved subject matter/waiver program) and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance with TB test clearance and program assessments completed prior to Directed Teaching; Directed Teaching approval process must be completed with clearance by the Director of Field Experiences; The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework is permitted other than SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops. A candidate must petition for permission to take an additional course in advance with the Curriculum and Instruction Department’s Director of Field Experiences.

EDUC 171. Professional Practice Music. 2-10 Units.

This course is a full-day of Student Teaching in public schools. Candidates for a Single Subject Music Preliminary teaching credential are placed in local public schools for intensive application of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for professional practice in California schools. Student Teaching is full-day teaching for a semester, and undergraduates may be approved for Student Teaching. Prerequisites are EDUC 130, EDUC 140, EDUC 141, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDUC 152, EDUC 161, EDUC 162, EDUC 163, EDUC 171 (concurrently); SPED 125X (concurrently) with grades of “C” or higher; a minimum GPA of 2.5; admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; a passing score on the CBEST with subject matter completed (CSET examination or approved subject matter/waiver program) and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance with TB test clearance program assessments completed prior to Directed Teaching; completed Directed Teaching approval process with clearance by the Director of Field Experiences; The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework is permitted other than EDUC 172 and SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops. A candidate must petition for permission to take an additional course in advance with the Curriculum and Instruction Department’s Director of Field Experiences.

EDUC 172. Professional Practice Seminar. 2-10 Units.

Students reflect upon and integrate the Directed Teaching experience in large and small group settings for the SB 2042 Credential. Topics include multicultural education, child abuse, school law, interpreting standardized test scores, professional associations and negotiations, discipline plans, lesson planning and conferencing skills. This course may be taken concurrently with EDUC 170/EDUC 270.

EDUC 175. Teaching in the Content Areas III. 2 Units.

This course is the culminating part of a three-part course for Single Subject credential candidates that develops professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms schools. It is taken concurrently with the professional practice practicum (student teaching). Emphasis in the first two parts of the course is placed on acquiring and practicing general and content-specific knowledge, skills, and ethical values associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. The course is co-taught by University faculty and K-12 Content Area Specialists. In the third and final portion of the course, candidates integrate and synthesize prior learning and independently teach grades 7 – 12 students in their professional practice placements. University and Grades 7 – 12 Content Area Specialists supervise and support candidates and continue to lead seminar sessions. The capstone assessment that leads to the Level I teaching credential, the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) Teaching Event (TE) is completed as part of this course.

EDUC 180. Workshop Learning: Issues Group Leadership. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to support the learning and leadership model, Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL). The course topics include practical information (understanding motivation, managing time, dealing with dominating students, learning styles, group dynamics, study skills, helping students improve critical thinking, develop logical reasoning, and prepare for tests), a foundation in learning theory, and guidance about the specific components of the workshop lessons.

EDUC 181. ECE: Social Justice/Diversity. 3 Units.

This course is conducted as an undergraduate level seminar that is designed to examine key normative issues in the area of social justice, diversity and multiculturalism with an emphasis in early childhood education. The relation of social diversity (race, ethnicity, gender, language, societal attitudes and class) to equality in education and education reform movements is viewed from multiple contexts. Topics explored are diversity, sociopolitical aspects of history and the impact on education, and specifically, early childhood education and multiculturalism. A practicum is required in this course. (ETHC)

EDUC 182. ECE: Curriculum and Inquiry. 3 Units.

This course is an upper division course that examines the theoretical understandings of curriculum and inquiry in the early childhood development classroom. Students refine their knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to early childhood methodology and application to young children in diverse populations.

EDUC 183. ECE: Social Contexts/Cognitive Development. 3 Units.

This course is conducted as an undergraduate level seminar that is designed to clarify the cognitive, philosophical, historical, psychological, cultural, social and ethical foundations of early childhood education. The nature of theory and practice are important to teachers of young children and this course provides a broad synthesis of knowledge of child development principles to better understand how children think, act, and how to be effective with them in the classroom.

EDUC 189. Practicum. 2-4 Units.

EDUC 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 192. Preliminary Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192A. Elementary Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192B. Secondary Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192D. Early Childhood Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192E. Reading Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192F. Bilingual Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192G. Cross-cultural Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 195A. Pedagogical Seminar. 3 Units.

Investigation of the role that subject matter knowledge and its representations play in teaching. Emphasis on self-assessment of subject matter knowledge. Focus on moral and ethical dimensions of teaching and learning. Prequisite: completion of a minimum of 8 units in a concentration for the diversified major or multiple subjects wavier program. Senior status or second semester junior status required. Permission of department chair.

EDUC 197. Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 197D. Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 201. Techniques of Research. 3 Units.

Students study the various research methodologies that include qualitative, descriptive, causal-comparative, survey, correlational and experimental. Emphasis is on learning to read and comprehend research published in professional journals. The content includes understanding how basic descriptive and inferential statistics are applied to address quantitative research questions.

EDUC 202. Statistical Thinking and Communication. 3 Units.

The objectives of this course are to review basic descriptive statistics and solidify students’ understanding of inferential techniques commonly employed in educational research. Students will learn how to conduct appropriate statistical analyses, interpreting output produced by SPSS statistical software. Students will gain confidence in reading results sections of journal articles and learn to communicate using statistical terminology. Analysis of results sections of journal articles will demonstrate that the student can recognize situations, for which various statistical techniques are applicable, explain the reasoning underlying the choice of those techniques, interpret results, and critically evaluate whether the authors’ conclusions logically follow from the data analysis conducted and the statistical information presented. Students are expected to learn the power of statistical analysis.

EDUC 204. Pluralism in American Education. 3 Units.

This course is a multi-disciplinary examination of the effects of cultural and social pluralism on educational policy, philosophy, classroom instruction and professional ethics in American public education, both historically and as contemporary issues. (ETHC)

EDUC 205. Urban Issues in Education. 3 Units.

This course is designed to enhance educators’ awareness of and applied expertise in effectively addressing the issues facing youth attending public schools in urban settings. The focus is on developing, implementing and evaluating interventions using evidence based practices framework, which impact the achievement gap. The complex and multilayered issues of educational equity across diverse cultures will be analyzed. Participants will examine the varied cultural experiences of students and their communities and how learning and behavior is influenced in the classroom.

EDUC 207. Sociology of Education. 3 Units.

Students study the sociology of education and the classroom.

EDUC 209. Curriculum Theory. 3 Units.

Students examine curriculum from various philosophical and learning theory points of view. Models and rationales of curriculum are explored. Historical perspectives and specialized areas of the curriculum are examined in terms of present and future societal needs, and methods of curriculum dissemination are delineated.

EDUC 211. Project Management. 2 Units.

This course provides knowledge and skills necessary to manage projects related to learning and change initiatives. Emphasis will be on tools, techniques, and steps of managing projects through an applied project management process.

EDUC 212. Instructional Strategies and Classroom Process. 3 Units.

Students learn a variety of instructional strategies to achieve course objectives. Course content includes a review of research on effective teaching skills related to motivation, expectations, modeling, questioning, grouping, direct instruction, cooperative learning and classroom management. Students examine contemporary lines of inquiry with regard to classroom processes.

EDUC 214. Supervision of Instruction. 3 Units.

This course offers a review of models of supervision and processes that support effective descriptions of classroom practices, analysis and feedback regarding those data and the provision of instructional support for continuing classroom improvement. A practicum component is included.

EDUC 216. Nature and Conditions of Learning. 3 Units.

Students study both cognitive and traditional learning theories, their applications to instruction and the development of effective teaching strategies. In addition, information processing models are explored and their implications for instruction are addressed.

EDUC 220. Seminar: Social Class Effects in Education. 3 Units.

This seminar explores the nature of social class and its effects on learning in the classroom.

EDUC 221. Research in Second Language Acquisition. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the linguistic, psychological, social and cultural processes in learning and teaching a second language. It is designed to examine the major theoretical perspectives and research studies in second language acquisition. It involves critical analysis and critique of important literature and research studies in second language acquisition. It covers techniques for conducting classroom-based research in second language learning and teaching. Students in this course learn to develop a research proposal to investigate an area of interest in the field of second language acquisition.

EDUC 225. Psychology of Reading. 3 Units.

Students explore current theory and research findings related to the psychological processes involved in literacy acquisition and development. Emphasis is placed upon a cognitive and psycholinguistic approach to understanding the processes of reading and the implications for instruction.

EDUC 230. Leading in Diverse Contexts. 3 Units.

This course provides knowledge and skills to lead, motivate, and coordinate diverse individuals toward attaining shared goals. The course will include study of leadership in organizational and community-based contexts, with an emphasis on development of personal leadership competencies.

EDUC 235. Organizational Analysis. 3 Units.

This course provides knowledge and skills of the process and techniques used to conduct an analysis to identify societal, organizational, departmental and individual performance needs.

EDUC 236. Performance Improvement. 3 Units.

This course provides knowledge and skills to move from analysis of performance problems to identifying, selecting, and developing interventions that improve performance of individuals, groups, and organizations to achieve strategic and tactical goals. Prerequisite: EDUC 236.

EDUC 237. Organizational Learning. 3 Units.

Utilization of principles and theory understand how organizations learn, how they change their levels of organizational knowledge, and how they foster cultures of growth and renewal. Focus on theory and practice-based processes for creating, retaining, and transferring knowledge within an organization, as well understanding organizations within a systems context.

EDUC 238. Organizational Change and Consulting. 3 Units.

This course provides knowledge and skills necessary to understand and facilitate the implementation of change in organizations. Emphasis will be on both theoretical and practical aspects of organizational change, with particular emphasis on developing hands-on consulting skills.

EDUC 239. Coaching for Organizational Contexts. 3 Units.

Development of skills and knowledge to partner with others in their professional development, with the aim of helping people reach their goals and enhance performance through exploration of ideas and dialogue. Focus on theory, research and applied techniques to facilitate an evidence-based coaching process.

EDUC 240. Introduction to Student Affairs. 3 Units.

This course is a comprehensive introduction and overview of student affairs and functions within institutions of higher education. Emphasis is on studying the history and evolution of the student affairs movement, gaining an understanding of the multiple roles of the student affairs practitioner, creating an awareness of the best practices in student personnel, and developing knowledge of current issues regarding students and student services functions in higher education.

EDUC 241. Student Development Theory. 3 Units.

This course is a forum for students to critically examine and evaluate current student development theories, research, and implications for practice. The course content includes study of attitudes and characteristics of American college students and their various cultures. This course also explores current issues in higher education as they impact student affairs roles and practice.

EDUC 242. College Student Environment. 3 Units.

Students examine the characteristics and attitudes of traditional and non-traditional American college students and the effect of the college environment on students. Students study the historical and contemporary characteristics of students, understand the characteristics and needs of various sub-populations, and research the effects of college and its environments on students.

EDUC 243. Legal Issues in Higher Education Student Affairs. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview of legal issues in American higher education, specifically those related to Student Affairs. This course is designed to ensure that students have the opportunity to learn basic legal principles necessary to function in an administrative or managerial capacity in post-secondary institutions. Administrative arrangements, policy issues, and case law are reviewed and discussed.

EDUC 244. Assessment in Student Affairs. 3 Units.

Study of the elements of program assessment with an emphasis on models for practice in co-curricular programs. Emphasis is on practical and collaborative applications in university settings as well as analysis and critical reflection on assessment trends and movements.

EDUC 245. Counseling Theories in College Student Affairs. 3 Units.

This course offers a critical and comprehensive study of current counseling theories and their application for student affairs practitioners.

EDUC 246. Teaching as Reflective Inquiry I. 2 Units.

Teaching as Reflective Inquiry I is the first of a three-part course in which preservice teachers are introduced to the concept of teacher research. First, participants critically analyze readings and teacher-inquiry products of experienced teacher researchers. They then conduct a mini-inquiry into their own practices that emerge as a result of their participation in the summer experience. These activities set the stage for more advanced consideration and application of teacher inquiry methods in parts II and III of the course, that lead to a culminating project during the professional practice practicum.

EDUC 250. Teaching Assessment. 3-4 Units.

This course supports reflective teaching and learner-centered principles and practices in K-12 schools. The course focuses on state-adopted curriculum standards and frameworks in seven content fields, particularly on the content area of History/Social Science; approaches to classroom management; selection of curriculum materials at the state level; and evaluation. Topics include implementing appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of students with special needs and culturally diverse learners; and using developmentally appropriate diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments to plan instruction. Technology is used to enhance curriculum design and student interaction with content knowledge. Prerequisites: EDUC 140; Fingerprint and TB test results.

EDUC 253. Teaching Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). 4 Units.

Methods and curriculum presented for teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics in self-contained classrooms. Topics include state-adopted content standards and curriculum frameworks; essential mathematics, technology, engineering, life, physical, and earth science themes, concepts, and skills; instructional planning and diverse and appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; principles and practices of evaluation of students’ learning. Fieldwork is required.

EDUC 254. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Secondary Classrooms. 3 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Pre-service teachers will survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Prerequisites: Minimum GPA 2.5, Fingerprint and TB test clearance. Permission of instructor or curriculum and instruction department.

EDUC 255. Teaching in the Content Areas I. 3 Units.

This is the first of a multi-course series for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. Candidates learn and apply current learning theories to planning, instruction, and assessment, focusing on the general knowledge, skills, and dispositions associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. Candidates will begin to learn about specific subject matter content and pedagogy and a variety of instructional and assessment strategies to benefit all learners. The needs of all secondary school students, including English Learners, and characteristics of the school environment will be emphasized for fostering effective teaching and learning.

EDUC 256. Content and Disciplinary Literacy Development in Secondary Schools. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to research-based content literacy instruction. The course focuses on preparing candidates to teach content-based reading and writing skills to a full range of students which includes struggling readers, students with special needs, and English Learners. A variety of content-based literacy strategies (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) is presented to facilitate learning in the content areas. The course meets credential requirements. Prerequisites: EDUC 140, admission to Creditial Candidacy, Instructor/Curriculum and Instruction department permission, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 257. TESOL Theories and Practices. 4 Units.

This course is designed to provide a link between theory and practice in the teaching of ESL. Aspects of language learning are discussed, and concomitant instruction and curriculum is analyzed while developing a working model for the development of curriculum which is appropriate for the teaching situation.

EDUC 259. Teaching English Learners - Single Subject. 3 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English proficiency in secondary classrooms. Teachers will develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to both the California English Language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these strategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objectives include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours specific to this class are required. A grad of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 140; minimum 2.5 GPA; Fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 260. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Classrooms. 3 Units.

Core course concepts and activities taught include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. K-12 preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher wellbeing and self-care. Senior standing or permission of instructor.

EDUC 261. Literacy Development. 4 Units.

This course introduces methods and curriculum for teaching reading and language arts with integration of humanities and social science for students from kindergarten to eighth grade classrooms. The course focuses on theory-based effective instruction of reading, writing, listening and speaking across the curriculum. Students learn to analyze and evaluate effective literacy skills and strategies in teaching reading, writing, listening and speaking to K-8 students, and to apply and practice these skills and strategies in various instructional settings in various content areas. Emphasis is placed on the integration of reading and language arts throughout the curriculum. Twenty-four hours of fieldwork is required. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching (Professional Practice).Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education program with fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 262. Advanced Methods in Bilingual Education. 3 Units.

This course provides a critical interpretation of current practice in bilingual education, based on theory and research.

EDUC 263. Teaching English Learners. 4 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English profeciency in K-8 classrooms. Teachers will develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to both the California english Language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these strategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objectives include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series fieldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequiesites: EDUC 100, 140, and 150, or instructor/C & I department permission; minimum GPA of 2.5; Finerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 264. Introduction to Bilingual Education. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of bilingual education and is designed to meet the needs of both undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in understanding the role of bilingual, bicultural education in schools. Students explore the related implications of second language acquisition research, sociopolitical theory, and historical as well as contemporary experiences in the contexts of program design, instructional practice, and school/community relations toward a conceptualization of bilingual education as a source of pedagogical enrichment strategies for all learners in all settings. (ETHC)

EDUC 265. Teaching in the Content Areas II. 2 Units.

This is the second of a multi-course series for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. The emphasis in this course is on content-specific practices. Candidates join their respective professional organizations and participate in those organizations’ professional development experiences. In addition to whole class meetings, candidates meet in content-specific seminars with practitioners in their content areas on a regular basis.

EDUC 266. Teaching as Reflective Inquiry II. 2 Units.

Teaching as Reflective Inquiry II is the second of a three-part course in which preservice teachers continue ot learn and apply the principles of teacher research. Participants examine their teaching practices and generate inquiry questions that examine their impact on student achievement in their year-long professional practice placements (student teaching). This semester's emphases include the development of research questions, research methods, design and data collection that lead to a year-long study.

EDUC 267. Understanding Adolescents in School Contexts. 3 Units.

This course is designed for secondary preservice teachers to consider the principles of adolescent development in context. Biological, cognitive, psychological, social, and moral development are examined to determine how these developmental pathways affect student achievement, motivation, and well being. The influence of family, peers, school, and the broader community on development are explored as well. Implications of current understandings of adolescent development on teaching, learning, and assessment is emphasized. In addition to class meetings, students participate in a practicum in order to apply learning in school settings.

EDUC 270. Professional Practice. 1-10 Units.

EDUC 270 offers student teaching for the SB 2042 Multiple Subject credential in public schools, for full-day placement. The placement requires additional assignments and action research for the MEd Degree. Prerequisites are completion of prerequisite coursework with grade “C” or higher, minimum GPA of 3.0, admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy, CBEST passed, subject matter completed and approved, approval of a Certificate of Clearance, TB test clearance, program assessments completed, completion of Directed Teaching approval process and clearance by the Director of Field Experiences. The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework permitted other than EDUC 172 and SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops, except that a candidate must petition in advance to the Curriculum and Instruction Department’s Director of Field Experiences for enrollment in an additional concurrent course. The course is open only to MEd Degree candidates. Corequisites are EDUC 172 and SPED 125X.

EDUC 271. Professional Practice Music. 2-10 Units.

EDUC 271 offers Student Teaching or Internship for the Music Single Subject credential. The Music Education Department Chair approves one or more semesters of Directed Teaching and assigns number of units for each semester. The total over one or more semesters must be ten (10) units. This course is open to Master of Education candidates. Prerequisites: 1) Student Teaching; 2) Internship 1) Completion of all prerequisite coursework with grade of "C" or higher; minimum GPA of 2.5; Admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; CBEST passed; subject matter completed and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance; TB test clearance; program assessments completed; completion of Directed Teaching approval process and clearance by the Director of Field Experiences and Music Education Department Chair. The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. 2) Completion of all prerequisite coursework from 1) with grade of "C" or higher; minimum GPA of 3.0 in Teacher Education courses is required, and the United States Constitution requirement must be completed prior to enrolling in an internship. A contract from the district and a Memorandum of Understanding between the district and the University of the Pacific are required. Corequisites: CURR 195x and SPED 125X. These corequisites must be taken once, if Directed Teaching is split over two or more semesters.

EDUC 272. Professional Practice Seminar. 2-10 Units.

This course is a reflection upon and integration of the Directed Teaching experience in large and small group settings for the SB 2042 Credential. Topics include multi-cultural education, child abuse, school law, interpreting standardized test scores, professional associates and negotiations, discipline plans, lesson planning and conferencing skills. Prerequisite: EDUC 170 or EDUC 270.

EDUC 274. Action Research. 3 Units.

This course focuses on methods of designing and conducting action research in education. Topics include: characteristics of action research, data collection and analysis, determining trustworthiness, and ethical issues related to action research. Students will engage in action research to learn how to develop actionable knowledge. This course is a component in the set of research courses required for master and doctoral students.

EDUC 275. Teaching in Content Areas III. 3 Units.

This is the culminating part of a multi-course series for Single Subject credential candidates following full-time professional practice (student teaching). The goal of this course is to enhance and extend the general and content-specific knowledge, skills, and dispositions acquired in the previous courses in this series and during professional practice. The use of general and content-specific educational technology is emphasized, allowing candidates to explore a variety of ways to integrate technology into instruction. During the course, candidates examine the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS). Further, issues shaping today’s technology uses in education are surveyed and discussed.

EDUC 276. Teaching as Reflective Inquiry III. 3 Units.

Teaching as Reflective Inquiry III is the culminating section of a three-part course in which preservice teachers continue to apply principles of teacher research. This is also the capstone course for the M.Ed. Participants continue to conduct action research, initiated in the prior semester, on their impact on student achievement. At the semester's conclusion, participants submit research reports and make presentations of their findings to panels made up of University and K-12 faculty.

EDUC 277. Diversity and Constituency in Educational Administration. 3 Units.

Students explore the values and concerns of the many diverse communities that constitute a school community and they learn effective ways to involve various communities in the participation of school life are presented.

EDUC 278. Educational Organization and Diverse Constituencies. 3 Units.

Organizational patterns and issues that are related to the administration of educational organizations are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on effectively involving diverse stakeholders into the organizational culture of educational institutions.

EDUC 280. Education Law and Legal Processes. 3 Units.

Students examine laws, legal principles, interpretations and practices governing federal, state, county and local school organization and administrations. Course content includes laws relating to youth, contracts, liability and tort, effect of federal and state laws on education.

EDUC 281. Modern Trends in Early Childhood Education. 3 Units.

Students learn current trends in the education of children from birth through third grade.

EDUC 282. Advanced Curriculum and Theory in Early Childhood Education. 3 Units.

Involvement with curriculum design, analysis and evaluation.

EDUC 283. School Finance and Business Administration. 3 Units.

Public schools as economic institutions and the roles of the federal, state and local governmental agencies related to school finance are addresses. Students examine public school revenues and expenditures, budget development and administration, and the operational finance of funds and services.

EDUC 284. Directed Teaching Special Assignment. 2-10 Units.

All day Student Teaching in subject-matter classroom(s) and action research, usually in a secondary school. Open only to Master of Education candidates. Prerequisites: completion of all prerequisite coursework with grade "C" or higher; minimum GPA of 3.0; Admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; CBEST passed; subject matter completed and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance; TB test clearance; program assessments completed; completion of Directed Teaching approval process and clearance by the Director of Field Experiences. The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework permitted other than CURR 195X and SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops, except that a candidate must petition in advance to the Curriculum and Instruction Department's Director of Field Experiences for an additional concurrent course. Corequisite: CURR 195X, SPED 125X.

EDUC 285. Educational Leadership. 3 Units.

Students examine functions, responsibilities and relationships of the school principal. Emphasis is on instructional leadership, leadership styles, human relations skills, working with school-community task groups and forces, public relations, needs assessment, decision-making analysis and computers as a management tool.

EDUC 286. Administration of Human Resources. 3 Units.

This course addresses skills and techniques of employee selection, orientation, administration, supervision and evaluation. Topics include staff development activities, determining personnel need, and employee organizations.

EDUC 289. Practicum. 2-4 Units.

Graduate students may enroll in library research with consent of the department chair.

EDUC 290. Technology in Educational Administration. 3 Units.

In this course student explore a variety of technological applications related to educational administration, teaching, and learning.

EDUC 291. Graduate Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Graduate students may enroll in library research with consent of the department chair.

EDUC 292. Advanced Fieldwork. 1-6 Units.

Prerequisite: Consent of the department chair.

EDUC 292A. Elementary Education Fieldwork. 1-6 Units.

EDUC 292B. Secondary Education Fieldwork. 1-6 Units.

EDUC 292C. Student Affairs Field Experience. 1-3 Units.

Student Affairs Field Experience allows students to experience a variety of professional roles under the guidance of mentorship of a qualified Student Affairs or Higher Education Administration practitioner. Field experience serves as a complement to students classroom learning and integrates classroom theories and ideas with practical applications.

EDUC 292D. Early Childhood Education Fieldwork. 1-6 Units.

EDUC 292E. Field Experience in Administration and Supervision. 1-4 Units.

This course offers experience in practical on-the-job administrative and supervisory functions at a school site. One unit over each of three semesters is required. This field experience is open only to administrative credential candidates at the University. Permission of department.

EDUC 292F. Reading Fieldwork. 1-6 Units.

EDUC 292H. Special Projects Fieldwork. 1-6 Units.

EDUC 292L. Advanced Fieldwork in Bilingual Education. 1-6 Units.

EDUC 293Z. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 295A. Seminar: Middle School Curriculum. 3 Units.

Students review curricular issues in middle schools in the United States, that include an analysis of curricular concepts and the social, economic and political forces, that may shape forth-coming curricular design. Specific content includes historical and philosophical foundation; curriculum trends, alternative approaches; and curriculum materials analysis.

EDUC 295B. Seminar: Secondary Curriculum. 3 Units.

Students review the curriculum issues in middle and secondary schools in the United States, that include an analysis of curriculum concepts and the social, economic and political forces that may shape forthcoming curricular design. Specific content includes historical and philosophical foundations, curriculum trends, alternative approaches, curriculum materials, analysis and issues that relate to adolescence.

EDUC 295C. Seminar: Educational Planning, Delivery, Assessment. 3 Units.

The role of the administrator as the instructional leader is the focus. Facets of the instructional program include curriculum planning, programmatic issues, delivery systems and assessment and evaluation.

EDUC 295E. Seminar: Teaching Reading and Writing. 3 Units.

Students examine current theory, research, trends, and issues in the teaching of reading and writing. Students translate theory and research in practice through observation of and participation with children in reading and writing activities. Prerequisites: previous coursework in reading, writing, or language development. Graduate standing.

EDUC 295G. Seminar: Elementary Curriculum. 3 Units.

Students review curricular issues in elementary schools in the United States, that include an analysis of curricular concepts and the social, economic, and political forces, that may shape forthcoming curricular design. Specific content includes historical and philosophical foundation, curriculum trends, alternative approaches, and curriculum materials analysis.

EDUC 295M. Seminar: Instructional Design and Development. 3 Units.

This course provides understanding and application in the design, development and evaluation of instruction for education and/or performance improvement, with focus on postsecondary, workplace, and other organizational settings.

EDUC 296. Leadership Integrative Capstone. 3-4 Units.

This course provides the culminating experience of the program, including leadership-related professional fieldwork project and integration of research, theory, and practice.

EDUC 297. Graduate Research in Education. 1-3 Units.

EDUC 299. Master's Thesis. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 302. Issues in Teacher Education. 3 Units.

Students review and analyze current curricular topics related to pre-service and in-service teacher preparation.

EDUC 304. Program Evaluation. 3 Units.

Students examine selection design and the use of formal and informal devices for the purpose of making diagnosis of learner strengths and weaknesses, measuring learner progress and making summative evaluations of learner achievement, both on an individual and larger scale basis.

EDUC 306. Curriculum Materials Development. 3 Units.

Students design and develop appropriate curriculum materials for to achieve program and course objectives.

EDUC 308. Issues in Curriculum and Instruction. 3 Units.

Students explore crucial issues and trends in curriculum and instruction, their historical origins, current manifestations and implications for teaching and learning in effective schools.

EDUC 314. Contemporary Issues in Schooling and Education. 3 Units.

The intent of this course is to further inquiry into the ways in which school policies and practices have historically been initiated and implemented. In addition attention is paid to the role teachers and students play in the operationalizing of policies and research-based practices. Attention to review of pertinent readings is also emphasized.

EDUC 316. Interdisciplinary Curriculum Inquiry. 3 Units.

This course is designed to engage doctoral students in understanding the interrelationships between content areas and how teaching and learning are manifested through the use of interdisciplinary curricular strategies.

EDUC 318. Research in Classroom Context. 3 Units.

This course focuses on how to develop skills and knowledge related to conducting research in culturally and ethnically diverse classroom settings. Emphasis is placed on the collection and analysis of data, primarily through observations, interviews and curriculum documents. Students design and implement a study in a classroom context and present their work both in oral and written form.

EDUC 319. Curriculum Analysis. 3 Units.

Development of specific skills necessary for in-depth, formal analysis of any given Curriculum, focusing on origins, theoretical perspectives, implementation, enactment, and evaluation.

EDUC 320. Advanced Curriculum Studies. 3 Units.

This course is intended to be a capstone research course in curriculum studies. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of curriculum issues and subsequent research-based and theoretical perspectives relative to areas of doctoral scholarship.

EDUC 321. Writing for Publication. 3 Units.

Focus on the relationship between formal inquiry and the development of research-based scholarship. Emphasis on manuscript development for the purpose of submitting to an academic journal for publication consideration.

EDUC 322. Qualitative Research Design and Methods. 3 Units.

This course focuses on methods of designing and conducting qualitative research in education. Topics include: characteristics of qualitative research, data collection and analysis, determining validity and reliability, and ethical issues related to qualitative research. Students will engage in qualitative research at off-campus field sites. This course is a component in the set of research courses required for all Ed.D. students. Prerequisites: EDUC 201 with a "B" or better or equivalent and EDUC 202.

EDUC 323. Advanced Qualitative Research. 3 Units.

This course builds upon the Qualitative Research Design (EDUC 322) course. Students engage in research and theory related to specific qualitative research methodologies and methods related to their areas of interest. The course readings and activities are designed to prepare students to develop and implement a high quality qualitative study. Prerequisite: EDUC 322.

EDUC 325. Quantitative Research Design and Methods. 3 Units.

This course exposes students to and develops their ability to conceptualize a broader range of research questions dealing with (a) significance of group differences; (b) degree of relationship among variables; (c) prediction of group membership; and/or (d) structure that quantitative design and analysis strategies might inform than those typically introduced in a first course (e.g., EDUC 201). Topics emphasized in the course relate to (a) the purpose and principles of research design; (b) the use of multivariate approaches and analysis; and (c) the construction and validation of measuring instruments. Students learn both to critically examine published research as well as to design methods for studies proposed to validly address research questions dealing with (a) significance of group differences; (b) degree of relationship among variables; (c) prediction of group membership; and/or (d) structure. Prerequisite: EDUC 202.

EDUC 326. Applied Multiple Regression. 3 Units.

This course acquaints the student with the use of the general linear model as a data analytic tool. Students learn how to generate the interpret output produced by SPSS statistical software in conducting (a) multiple regression analyses involving both continuous and categorical independent variables; and (b) logistic regression analyses involving categorical dependent variables. Prerequisite: EDUC 202 or equivalent course.

EDUC 327. Structural Equation Modeling. 3 Units.

This course is designed to build upon knowledge and skills in multivariate statistical analysis and introduce students to structural equation modeling. Students will develop conceptual as well as practical understandings of structural equation modeling (SEM), and will learn basic SEM techniques to analyze data. Students will also develop skills in writing results from an SEM analysis. Prerequisites: EDUC 325, EDUC 326.

EDUC 330. Advanced Human Development I. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the developmental period of early childhood development. The course examines theoretical and research-based knowledge of the influences of biological, social, affective, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socio-economic, gender-related, and linguistic factors in children’s development.

EDUC 331. Advanced Human Development II. 4 Units.

This course focuses on the developmental period of middle childhood and adolescent development. The course examines theoretical and research-based knowledge of the influences of biological, social, affective, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socio-economic, gender-related, and linguistic factors in children’s and adolescent’s development.

EDUC 332. Advanced Human Development III. 2 Units.

This course focuses on adult development, aging and long term care. The course examines theoretical and research-based knowledge of the influences of biological, social, cognitive affective, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socio-economic, gender-related, and linguistic factors in adult development, aging and long term care.

EDUC 334. Theories of Multicultural Marriage and Family Therapy. 3 Units.

This course prepares mental health clinicians to assess functioning in and design and implement interventions for couples and families by studying major theories of couples and family therapy.

EDUC 335. Psychotherapeutic Interventions. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview of counseling and psychotherapeutic theories, principles, and techniques, including the counseling process in a multicultural society, an orientation to wellness and prevention, counseling theories to assist in the selection of appropriate counseling interventions, models of counseling consistent with current professional research and practice, and the development of a personal model of counseling.

EDUC 336. Group Counseling. 3 Units.

This course prepares mental health professionals to use direct methods and techniques of group counseling for children, adolescents, adults, and elder adults.

EDUC 337. Crisis Intervention. 3 Units.

This course reviews counseling theory and basic listening and responding skills and contrast them with crisis counseling practices. It also examines various programmatic approaches to the primary and secondary prevention of educational failure and the promotion of health and mental health. The focus is on the enhancement of individual and family competence following a crisis event. The course explores the underlying knowledge base, models for implementing prevention, specific examples of techniques and programs designed to intervene before, during and after a crisis event. Also covered is policy questions, and evaluation issues. Specific attention is given to concepts of stress, coping, and resiliency. Programs such as suicide prevention, crisis intervention, drug and alcohol education, sexuality education, child abuse prevention, and others are closely examined and criticized.

EDUC 338. Consultation Methods. 3 Units.

This course prepares school psychologists to provide mental health consultation to school personnel and parents. Various consultation methodologies will be studied with applications particularly appropriate to children in the public school system.

EDUC 340. Introduction to School Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course serves as an introduction to the specialization of school psychology. It is intended to give the student an overview of the field of school psychology focusing on the role and function of the school psychologist in the public schools and other settings. Topics include the history of school psychology, Pupil personnel services in schools, service delivery models, school psychology, organizations, research traditions in school psychology, international school psychology, ethical and legal issues, publications and resources in school psychology.

EDUC 341. History and Systems in Psychology. 3 Units.

This course explores major developments and ideas in the history of psychology as an academic discipline. Although our focus is on psychology, this course also introduces students to the history and foundations of the profession of school psychology, including education, special education, health care, and related fields. This course examines the historical progression of ideas central to psychology, the philosophical and empirical roots of those ideas, and the confluence of those ideas into the various systems we have today. This survey course includes such topics as of the history of psychology from the early Greek philosophers, through the beginnings of modern science and philosophy, through the early approaches to psychology, to psychology in its most contemporary form.

EDUC 342. Law and Professional Ethics for Mental Health Professionals. 3 Units.

This course is designed for students in credential and licensing graduate programs in human services and mental health professions. Students will study approaches to ethical decision-making in addition to learning relevant law and regulation and existing ethical codes of behavior.

EDUC 343. Psychopathology and Wellness Promotion. 3 Units.

This course will examine a variety of mental disorders from a variety of perspectives, including the biomedical model of mental disorders and diagnostic categories while emphasizing sociocultural viewpoints and developmental experiences. The predominant treatments, including educational interventions, for the major disorders will also be covered, as well as primary and secondary prevention of mental disorders and the promotion of health and mental health in public schools and the community.

EDUC 344. Data-Based Decision Making I: Behavioral Assessment and Intervention. 3 Units.

This course introduces the graduate student to the systematic processes used by school psychologists and educators to collect and analyze data and write an intervention plan. For students in the School Psychology program, this course is accompanied by one unit of EDUC 396 School Psychology Field Work. Students will learn various methods of data collection, including interviews, systematic observations, and review of records, designing interventions, implementing interventions, and analyzing interventions. Particular attention is given to collecting and analyzing behavioral data within a response to intervention (RTI) framework.

EDUC 345. Data-Based Decision Making II: Academic Assessment and Intervention. 3-4 Units.

This course introduces graduate students to the systematic processes used by school psychologists, educators, mental health professionals and other school personnel to collect and analyze academic data and design and implement academic interventions. Students learn various methods of academic assessment including academic data collection (including curriculum based assessment and other standardized and norm referenced tests), designing academic interventions, implementing academic interventions, analyzing the outcomes of academic interventions, and writing academic support plans. Particular attention is given to collecting and analyzing academic data within a response to intervention (RTI) framework.

EDUC 346. Psychological Assessment. 3 Units.

This course prepares mental health professionals to use psychological testing and assessment information in a problem solving process, and to use data-based decision making to improve outcomes for instruction, development of cognitive and academic skills, and the development of life competencies. Students will also be exposed to process and procedures identified in referral and state laws related to special education services.

EDUC 347. Behavior and Personality Assessment. 3 Units.

This course is designed to help students gain proficiency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of several instruments commonly used in behavioral and personality assessment. The writing of professional reports, theoretical aspects and measurement of behavior and personality, and legal and ethical issues will be addressed.

EDUC 348. Neuropsychology. 3 Units.

This course provides a general overview of: brain-based behavior; neuroanatomy and physiology; conceptualizing psychoeducational and psychological assessment data from a neuropsychological perspective; the effects and uses of psychotropic agents; and information on neuropathology.

EDUC 349. Psychopharmacology for Mental Health Professionals. 2 Units.

This course surveys the physiological and behavioral effects of the major classes of psychoactive drugs, including therapeutic agents and drugs of abuse, mechanisms of action, side effects, effects on the fetus, and collaborating with other health and mental health professionals and families. The main focus of this course is on psychoactive anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, and substance abuse.

EDUC 350. Social Psychology. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce students to current social psychology theory, concepts, and research. A broad range of theoretical topics will be covered, including research methodology, the self, attributions and social perception, social cognition, attitudes, social influence, attraction and interpersonal relationships, pro-social behavior, and aggression. Additionally, issues of diversity, such as prejudice, stereotypes, and group dynamics/relations, will be addressed. The relevance of these social psychology concepts as foundational for the practice of professional psychology will be highlighted.

EDUC 352. Applied Inquiry I. 3 Units.

In this course students work collaboratively in learning communities to identify and explore general and specific educational/social/political issues that affect learners/learning outcomes for key educational constituencies. Each student identifies a preliminary issue/problem/concern for his/her dissertation project and engages in early exploration of foundational issues, key theories, and seminal emerging research on these topics.

EDUC 353. Models of Epistemology and Inquiry. 3 Units.

This course addresses the epistemological frameworks that support and inform any systematic process of inquiry. The focus is not so much on how research is conducted (an issue of methodology) but more on how a researcher thinks about the world and about the process of knowing (an issue of theory and mode of inquiry) in educational administration and in other educational fields. Prerequisite: Graduate Status.

EDUC 354. Applied Inquiry II. 3 Units.

This course provides doctoral students with an overview of assumptions/limitations/strengths and claims of educational research. Further, it provides them with an overview of quantitative and qualitative methodologies (data collection and analysis strategies) and of the relevance of these for specific problems and questions. Prerequisite: EDUC 352. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: EDUC 202.

EDUC 356. Applied Inquiry III. 3 Units.

This course places doctoral students into professional learning communities with colleagues and a faculty leader. In these communities, students work collaboratively and independently to ensure that each student develops a refined problem statement and draft literature review. Prerequisites: EDUC 354.

EDUC 358. Applied Inquiry IV. 3 Units.

This course places doctoral students into professional learning communities with colleagues and a faculty leader. In these communities, students work collaboratively and independently to ensure that each student develops a defense ready dissertation proposal. Prerequisite: EDUC 356.

EDUC 359. Dissertation Boot Camp. 3 Units.

This course is ideal for doctoral candidates who have an approved dissertation proposal and seek support in writing their dissertation. This course also benefits doctoral students who are in the process of completing their dissertation proposal. This course facilitates intensive, focused writing time, and provides participants with strategies and structure to overcome common roadblocks in the dissertation process. Prerequisite: Approved dissertation research proposal or instructor approval.

EDUC 360. Seminar: Trends, Issues and Dynamics of Change. 3 Units.

Students examine current issues and the impact of change in administration of educational programs.

EDUC 361. Seminar: Ethics, Law and Finance. 3 Units.

Students examine the relationships between ethics, law, and finance and how they impact decision-making in educational institutions.

EDUC 362. Seminar: Administration of Instructional Programs. 3 Units.

The seminar course covers instructional leadership, staff development, educational program planning/evaluation, curriculum designs and instructional delivery strategies, monitoring and evaluating student progress, and the use of instructional time and resources.

EDUC 363. Seminar: Personnel Issues. 3 Units.

This seminar course explores personnel management, resource allocations, employee evaluation, collective bargaining, staffing, staff development, and conflict mediation.

EDUC 364. Seminar: Educational Policy Making and Politics. 3 Units.

Students examine issues and techniques relative to policy formulation and implementation. The political, social and economic forces that impact policy decisions are emphasized.

EDUC 365. Seminar: Administration of Higher Education. 3 Units.

Students study administrative, educational and personnel problems and issues in community colleges and four-year institutions.

EDUC 366. Seminar: Communication and Public Relations in Education. 3 Units.

Techniques of effective communications in educational organizations are presented. Developing and maintaining positive public relations and public support for educational problems are emphasized.

EDUC 367. Seminar: Cultural Diversity and Educational Administration. 3 Units.

Students explore techniques for working with culturally diverse student, community and faculty populations.

EDUC 368. Seminar: Administering Complex Organizations. 3 Units.

This course provides an in-depth examination of the theory, research, and practice of administering and leading complex organizations.

EDUC 369. Seminar: District Office Administration. 3 Units.

This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the structure, functions, politics, and purpose of school district administration.

EDUC 370. Prof. Induction Planning. 2 Units.

Students learn how to develop a collaborative professional induction plan to meet the requirements for the Professional Administrative Services Credential.

EDUC 371. Professional Assessment. 2 Units.

This course provides a formal assessment of candidates for the Professional Administrative Services Credential.

EDUC 372. Program and Organization Evaluation. 3 Units.

The course provides knowledge, skills, and experience in the evaluation process for programs and organizations to facilitate organization effectiveness and development.

EDUC 373. Economics of Education. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to analyze alternative methods of assessing the contributions of education to economic growth, education and inequality, education production functions, cost analysis and planning, and economic aspects of innovation.

EDUC 374. Action Research. 3 Units.

This course focuses on methods of designing and conducting action research in education. Topics include: characteristics of action research, data collection and analysis, determining trustworthiness, and ethical issues related to action research. Students will engage in action research to learn how to develop actionable knowledge. This course is a component in the set of research courses required for master and doctoral students.

EDUC 375. Advanced Student Development Theory. 3 Units.

This course serves as a context for students to become knowledgeable about and to critically examine and evaluate contemporary Student Affairs and higher education theories focused on student learning growth, and change during the college experience.

EDUC 376. Critical and Contemporary Issues in Student Affairs. 3 Units.

This course serves as a context for students to become knowledgeable about and to critically examine and evaluate contemporary Student Affairs and higher education issues, trends, research, and implications for practice.

EDUC 380. Innovation in Organizational Leadership. 3 Units.

This course provides knowledge, practice, and experience in cross-sector innovation tools to impact organizations and institutions through leading the development of new ideas, processes, products, and/or services.

EDUC 381. Law in Higher Education. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to examine the legal diminsions of the collegiate-level decision process. Administrative arrangements, policy issues and case law are analyzed.

EDUC 382. Leadership in Higher Education. 3 Units.

This course prepares doctoral students with the attitudes and skills to analyze leadership theories, challenges and stategies in higher education.

EDUC 384. Spousal and Partner Abuse, Detection, and Intervention. 1 Unit.

This course addresses the causes, assessment, treatment, statistics and legal issues concerning intimate partner violence.

EDUC 385. Alcoholism and Chemical Substance Abuse Dependency. 1 Unit.

This course describes the most commonly abused substances as well as the signs of abuse and addiction and the most effective treatment principles and therapeutic techniques.

EDUC 386. Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting. 1 Unit.

This course provides information on identifying, assessing, and reporting child abuse and neglect, including the laws governing mandated reporting. This course also covers prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect.

EDUC 387. Human Sexuality. 1 Unit.

This course reviews the basic anatomy, sexual function and response, and challenges and disorders of sexual function. Diagnostic formulations and treatments for the disorders that clinicians are most likely to encounter in clinical practice are also presented. Finally, challenges and complexities of sexuality within special populations are reviewed.

EDUC 388. Counseling Practicum. 1-6 Units.

Counseling Practicum entails the supervised application of psychological procedures in appropriate settings.

EDUC 389. Curriculum Practicum. 2-4 Units.

EDUC 391. Graduate Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 391D. Graduate Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 391E. Graduate Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 391F. Graduate Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 392. Internship and Advanced Field Experience in Administration. 1-4 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 393C. Special Topics. 1-3 Units.

EDUC 393D. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 393E. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 393F. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 393G. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 393H. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 393I. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 394. Seminar: Doctoral Research in Educational Administration. 3 Units.

The goal of this semester is to have doctoral students develop an acceptable dissertation proposal. Faculty members lead discussions, provide individual assistance, and collaborate on individual student progress with the aim to assist the student in the proposal development process. The seminar is divided into group sessions and individual meetings with student selected dissertation advisors. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.

EDUC 396. School Psychology Fieldwork. 1-4 Units.

Fieldwork in School Psychology entails the supervised application of school psychological procedures in schools and related settings.

EDUC 397. Graduate Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 398. School Psychology Internship. 1-4 Units.

Students perform duties of a school psychologist in multicultural school settings under the direct supervision of a credentialed school psychologist. Placement must be half-or full-time. Prerequisites: Students must have an intern credential and permission of the instructor before beginning an internship.

EDUC 398B. QSA Projects. 1 Unit.

Doctoral students develop and complete each of three proposed QSA projects. Students work with a mentor and two department faculty in conducting research relevant to three proposed projects. Doctoral students must have completed the approval of the Qualifying Scholarly Activity proposal (CURR 397Ap) or may have permission to be concurrently enrolled in CURR 397B. Students may enroll more than one time in CURR 397B until all three QSA projects have been completed and defended.

EDUC 398C. Dissertation Proposal Development. 1 Unit.

This course is open to a doctoral student who has successfully completed all coursework and three Qualifying Scholarly Activities after taking CURR 397A and CURR 397B. The student prepares and defends the dissertation proposal and Institutional Review Board (IRB) proposal. The student concurrently enrolls in a minimum of one unit of CURR 399: Doctoral Dissertation.

EDUC 398D. Qualifying Scholarly Activities. 1 Unit.

EDUC 398 provides doctoral candidacy qualifying requirement to demonstrate competence in research and subject matter. Students (a) identify a research area and level, (b) complete a scholarly annotated bibliography, (c) respond to a question in the form of a scholarly paper, and (d) orally defend the response to the question.

EDUC 399. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Units.