Skip to Content

Law Courses

Law Courses

LAW 042. Central American Migration. 2 Units.

At least three significant migration waves characterize the journey north for thousands of Central Americans. The first, provoked by Guatemala's bloody 36-year civil war, involved thousands of political asylum seekers in Mexico and the United States. In the second wave, natural disaster displaced thousands of environmental and economic refugees. Most recently, in the third wave, primarily women and children are fleeing Central America's largely private violence when their own governments refuse or are unable to protect them. This course focuses on the social and legal disruptions produced by these waves of migration in the receiving nations, with a focus on Mexico and the United States. Students study and critique the responses of the sending and receiving nations to the phenomena of mass Central American outmigration.

LAW 043. U.S./Lat Amer.Foreign Relation. 2 Units.

The United States has long exerted great influence on Central and South America, sometimes intervening in harmful ways. Examples include the CIA's overthrow of the government of Guatemala in 1954, the Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba that led to an embargo that remains largely in effect today, the occupation of the Dominican Republic in 1965, interference with Chile's democratically elected government, and support of the Contra forces. This course examines selected legal issues relating to foreign relations including the role of treaties and customary international law, the authority and effectiveness of various U.S. and international decision-makers on foreign relations issues, the legality of the use of armed force and covert actions, and the humanitarian consequences of U.S. foreign policy toward Latin America in the past and going forward.

LAW 044. Environmental Protection and International Law in Latin America. 2 Units.

This course will examine critical issues in the relationship between environmental protection and international law in Latin America, with a primary focus on case studies in Guatemala and other Central American countries. The class will explore the relationship between human rights and environmental protection, the role of indigenous peoples and land tenure questions in environmental protection, biodiversity and forest conservation, and the relationship between free trade agreements and countries’ right to permanent sovereignty over their natural resources. These themes will be explored by focusing on case studies that include disputes about mining, forest conservation to address climate change, protected natural areas, and biodiversity protection.

LAW 045. Int'l Environmental Law. 1 Unit.

This course explores international efforts to protect the global environment. It will cover the international legal regimes dealing with climate change, endangered species, hazardous substances, transboundary pollution, and other problems.

LAW 060. Business Ethics: The New Role of Corporate Lawyers. 1 Unit.

This course addresses the new role of corporate lawyers, socially responsible according the modern theories of Legal ethics and to the UN recommendations. It will revise the opportunities and challenges for corporate lawyers, both in house or in law firms, in a globalized world. Finally, it will report good practices for lawyers in order to respond to negative impacts caused by human rights violations of multinational companies, and preventive good practices to avoid it. The course will examine the legal, ethical, policy, soft-law and jurisprudential issues associated with these matters. It will be taught through case law, descriptive readings, simulation exercises, and discussion.

LAW 061. Comparative Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law. 1 Unit.

This course provides a comparative overview of the regulation and treatment of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender persons. Topics will include the criminalization of sexual conduct as well as marriage and other relational rights. The course will look at developments in the United States (such as the recent decision of the United States Supreme Court mandating nationwide marriage equality) and compare them to developments in the European Union as well as in several others countries around the world. The course grade will be based on class participation (including an in-class presentation) and a take home exam.

LAW 100. Skills Lab- Torts. 1 Unit.

This required first-year course teaches students "best practices" for studying the law and learning legal analytical skills, including IRAC rule-based methodology as a structure for legal analysis, case-briefing, outlining, time-management, and test-taking. This course will be integrated with one of the first-year substantive courses required for students in the fall semester.

LAW 101. Contracts/Analytical Skills. 4 Units.

Contracts/Analytical Skills course offers a practical introduction to a foundational area or areas of law and to the legal method. Students will learn best practices for studying law and developing foundational legal analytical skills so that they may read and understand case law, statutes, and regulations. These analytical skills will include IRAC rule-based methodology as a structure for legal analysis, case-briefing, outlining, and test-taking. Students will also practice negotiating and drafting agreements. This highly interactive course will utilize multiple formative and summative assessments.

LAW 102. Assessment & Review - 1st Year. 0 Units.

This is a non-graded, zero unit course which students are automatically enrolled in to provide a scheduled block in their schedule for assessment and review. Faculty believe that regular assessment and feedback about academic progress is key to student success and therefore schedule assessment throughout the semseter, particularly in bar-tested courses. Blocks of time have been designated for this purpose for first and second year students adn are labeled on your schedule as "Assessment & Review Sessios." These sessions will be held on an as-needed basis; students should plan their schedules accordingly by reserving these blocks in their individual calendars.

LAW 104. Legal Profession. 1 Unit.

The Legal Profession will prepare students to enter into modern legal practice and assist them in developing a professional identity. Students will be introduced to the common ethical dilemmas they will confront as externs, clinical students and practicing lawyers, as well as the role of emerging technology in the provision of legal services. Students will survey the variety of legal practice areas to help them to identify a satisfying career path and learn successful job seeking strategies. Upon registration in Legal Profession, students will be charged a $15 course material fee.

LAW 105. Civil Procedure. 4 Units.

Questions of jurisdiction and venue; federal subject matter jurisdiction such as diversity and federal question ­jurisdiction; notice and code pleading; Federal Rules of Civil Procedure ­governing joinder of claims and parties; discovery; summary and default judgments; the right to a jury trial in civil matters; and issues of finality of judgments; appropriate examples drawn from California law.

LAW 110. Contracts. 4 Units.

Formation at common law and under the Uniform Commercial Code; consideration and other bases for enforcing promises; when writing is required; parole evidence and interpretation; ­unconscionability and other defenses; rights of third parties; excuses for ­nonperformance; conditions, performance and breach; damages.

LAW 115. Criminal Law. 2-4 Units.

The purpose of criminal law, the procedures by which it is enforced, and its substantive content, including offenses against the person, habitation and property; imputability and responsibility; modifying circumstances negating responsibility; and limitations on criminal capacity.

LAW 119. Make-up Class. 0 Units.

This is a make up period that is blocked off on student schedules to allow for make-up class time. Students will not receive credit for this course and it will not appear on final transcript upon completion of the term. This course block may not be used every week and professors for first year courses will indicate to students in class the dates that they will need to appear.

LAW 122. Global Lawyering Skills I. 2 Units.

Introduction to basic lawyering skills including legal research, writing, and analysis with an emphasis on objective legal reasoning. Students are taught to perform on-line and traditional research in primary and secondary authorities, and are introduced to research in international sources. Writing assignments build in complexity and include memoranda, client letters, and contract drafting, and are based on simulated case files.

LAW 125. Property. 4 Units.

Historical background, possessory and non-possessory interests in land and personality, creation and transfer of property interests, concurrent estates, landlord and tenant law, public ­regulation of property, eminent domain.

LAW 131. Torts. 4 Units.

The law of civil injuries. Civil liability for interference with a broad array of legally protected interests, focusing on such topics as intentional wrongdoing, ­negligence, defective products, abnormally dangerous activities, defamation, invasion of privacy, and misrepresentation. Alternatives to the existing tort system will be discussed. (Please note that this course also includes a one-unit Analytical Skills Lab for a total of 5 units.).

LAW 151. Business Associations. 4 Units.

Includes partnerships and nature and formation, capacity and authority of corporations; problems of management; liabilities of officers, directors and shareholders; issuance of shares, distribution of earnings; consolidation, merger and dissolution.

LAW 155. Community Property. 2 Units.

Initiation and existence of the marital community; nature of interests in property as separate or community; ­management, control and liability of property for obligations; conflict of laws; dissolution of the community, including settlement and support; changing views of community property under equal rights laws.

LAW 163. Constitutional Law. 4 Units.

This course will introduce students to the United States Constitution. Coverage may include federalism; separation of powers; the role of the courts (including justiciability); legislative powers; presidential powers; the regulation and protection of the national economy; protection of individual rights under the Constitution; equal protection; due process, including its substantive and procedural aspects; and First Amendment freedoms.

LAW 165. Criminal Procedure. 3 Units.

Constitutional regulation of the administration of criminal justice, including due process of law, unreasonable searches and seizures, compulsory self-incrimination, and the right to counsel; selected ­problems in criminal investigation, trial, and post-conviction remedies.

LAW 170. Wills and Trusts. 3 Units.

Coverage includes intestate succession; validity and operation of wills; probate and administration of trusts and estates; use of trusts in estate planning; duties of trustee; rights of beneficiaries and enforcement of trusts. Prerequisite: LAW 125.

LAW 174. Evidence. 4 Units.

The law of evidence in civil and criminal trials, including judicial notice, burden of proof, presumptions, functions of judge and jury, competency and privileges of witnesses; principal rules of admissibility and exclusion of testimony of witnesses and documents.

LAW 178. Evidence (ITAP). 4 Units.

This integrated course coordinates topics covered in Evidence with skills learned in Trial Advocacy. In Trial Advocacy, students learn how to analyze a trial file, construct a case theory, and practice all phases of trial. At the end of the course, students conduct a full-day jury trial. In Evidence, students learn how to analyze admissibility issues under Federal and State Rules of Evidence and work through evidentiary issues concurrently with issues raised in their skills classes, such as making and meeting objections, articulating offers of proof, and learning evidentiary foundations. The concepts taught in Evidence every week are reinforced in Trial Advocacy exercises, while skills taught in Trial Advocacy every week, are reinforced in Evidence hypotheticals. This concurrent study of evidentiary issues with their practical application in the trial setting is designed to reinforce a deep understanding of both Evidence and Trial Advocacy in context. The Integrated Course satisfies the requirement of Evidence, earning students 4-units for Evidence, and qualifies as an elective earning 3 credits for Trial Advocacy. Students who enroll in the combined course must take and complete all 7 units. (Evidence, Graded; Trial Advocacy, optional; Graded/Pass-Fail). Automatically enrolled in course 812. (Practicum).

LAW 182. Global Lawyering Skills II. 2 Units.

A continuation of the lawyering skills training provided in GLS Introduction. Students prepare trial and appellate court briefs and oral arguments using a simulated case file. Students work through a year-long problem representing one side of a simulated case. They are introduced to domestic and transnational legal issues, as well as strategic considerations concerning representations, litigation, and alternative dispute resolution.

LAW 185. Professional Responsibility. 2 Units.

Regulation of the legal profession and the ethical responsibilities of its members; the attorney-client relationship; advertising, solicitation and group legal service plans; compensation for legal services; fiduciary duties to client; avoiding conflicts of ­interest; competent representation; withdrawal from representation; duties and limitations on zealous representation; obligations to other attorneys, the court and the public; judicial ethics.

LAW 190. Remedies and Principles of Law. 3 Units.

A study of the theory and application of equitable remedies; the principles of equitable jurisdiction; the substantive law elements of restitution and damages. Course taught using online and distance technologies. Class will meet live online each week, after students complete an online pretest, to discuss assigned cases and materials, work through hypothetical problems and engage in discussion. There will be ample interaction with the professor and other students both inside and outside the formal structure of the course throughout its duration and there will be ample assessment of student effort and learning throughout the course. Limited Enrollment. Course to be taken during senior year.

LAW 200. Accounting for Lawyers. 2-3 Units.

This course provides exposure to principles of accounting from the perspective of the practicing attorney. Students will study the fundamentals of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), as will an array of legal issues important to both transactional attorneys and litigators. Students who are Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) or undergraduate accounting majors may not enroll in this course. (P/F).

LAW 202. Principles of Legal Analysis I. 1 Unit.

This course, taught in conjunction with Criminal Law, focuses on (1) improving the legal skills necessary for law school and legal practice, including writing skills relevant to law school exams and the bar examination; and (2) enhancing comprehension of selected Criminal Law principles. Students will complete various assessment exercises and will receive detailed feedback on their work. By invitation based on first semester grades only or with Director approval. (JD preferred).

LAW 206. Corporate Governance. 3 Units.

This course examines the transformation of the governance of public corporations in the aftermath of recent corporate scandal. It will assess the role of directors and senior officers, and the responsibilities of those advising them. It will also examine the changing claims and rights of other stakeholders, including shareholders, creditors and employees. Students will examine the legal theories of the public corporation in order to assess recent reforms, and will situate domestic developments in light of international responses and approaches. Other key issues will include corporate social responsibility; the role of institutional investors; “shareholder democracy”; the roles of professionals advising boards; executive compensation; Sarbanes-Oxley; and other legislative and regulatory responses to Enron and other scandals. Selected case studies will round out coverage. Evaluation is by class participation, case study presentation, short research paper and final take-home examination. Prerequisite: LAW 150 or LAW 151.

LAW 208. Principles Legal Analysis II. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on the study, organizational, writing and expression skills necessary for law school, the bar examination, and legal practice. The course will have a specific focus on legal analysis, including rule synthesis, deductive reasoning, analogical reasoning, issue analysis, as well as other skills such as exam preparation, time management, and outlining. Students will complete various assessment exercises and will receive detailed feedback on their work. This course meets during the week before classes begin in August and during the fall semester. By invitation only or with Director approval. (JD preferred.).

LAW 209. Local Agency Practice. 2 Units.

California has thousands of local agencies and special districts providing essential services. This course explores local agency decision making in a variety of substantive areas. In this active learning course, the substantive mandates and policies are integrated into practical simulations and realistic legal assignments that emphasize advocacy, negotiation, and litigation. The litigation component examines administrative and traditional writs in addition to validation and reverse validation actions - unique and specialized lawsuits brought to challenge government actions. The course will focus on the substantive areas of the Brown Act, Public Records Act, California Environmental Quality Act, and Political Reform Act. (Practicum).

LAW 210. Business Planning. 2-3 Units.

Consideration of selected problems involving the organization, financing, operation, and restructuring of business enterprises. The problems require the combined consideration and application of corporate, tax, and securities law, accounting and financial matters, and business considerations and strategies. The problems also raise pertinent questions regarding the relationship between the business client and counsel and attendant problems concerning a lawyer’s professional responsibility. Students may be expected to prepare research memoranda, legal opinions, and draft necessary documents. Prerequisites: LAW 150 or LAW 151; LAW 300.

LAW 211. Entrepreneurial Management. 2-3 Units.

This practicum course introduces students to the process and skills of entrepreneurship and new company development from initial launch through final exit. Topics include how to evaluate new business opportunities, how to assemble human, financial, and strategic resources for a new firm, and how to manage growth and exits. Weekly sessions will include not only thematic lectures and case discussions, but also in-depth discussions with leading Sacramento businesspeople on the topic of the week. Because this is a practicum course, students will learn not only through lectures and cases, but will also “learn by doing” in working on collaborative projects with Sacramento area entrepreneurs. The course concludes with a high profile public event in which students will have the opportunity to “showcase” their skills. The course is aimed at students seeking greater knowledge of business management skills and contexts.

LAW 212. Intro. to Legal Analysis. 2 Units.

This course provides students with an overview of the American legal system, including the sources and development of law as well as the dispute resolution process. The course further focuses on developing an understanding of how lawyers read and analyze cases, statutes, and legal documents and provides an introduction to legal reasoning. A primer on legal research with a focus on locating and evaluating the weight of legal sources is also included. (M.S.L., M.P.P. and M.P.A. only).

LAW 214. Small Business Seminar. 2 Units.

Small Business Seminar LAW 214 has a Pre Req of Business Associations - Law 150 or LAW 151.

LAW 216. The Business of Lawyering. 1 Unit.

This course uses an interactive model to explore the business side of law firms, including the critical skills needed to establish and operate a law firm as a solo or small firm practitioner. In addition, it provides an understanding of how larger law firms operate. It covers a broad array of topics related to the various dimensions of law practice, including business, clients, and life management. Business plans, marketing and client development, professional development, office management, and financial and ethical issues are among the subjects to be covered. Enrollment limit. (P/F) (Practicum).

LAW 220. Banking Law. 3 Units.

Introduction to the regulation of banks, savings and loan associations and their holding companies, particularly as they compete or interact with investment banks, securities dealers, real estate brokers, credit card issuers, and related financial services institutions.

LAW 223. Bankruptcy Survey. 2 Units.

This course gives students an introduction to bankruptcy law in the context of financially troubled consumers and small businesses. Through study of the United States Bankruptcy Code and the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, this problem-based course provides students with an opportunity to address the core concepts that apply in all bankruptcy cases, as well as issues specific to Chapters 7 and 13. Areas of emphasis include: eligibility for and dismissal of a bankruptcy case; claims against a debtor; treatment of executory contracts and leases; exemptions; and discharge of indebtedness.

LAW 225. Bankruptcy. 2-3 Units.

This course examines the United States Bankruptcy Code and the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure. Areas of emphasis are: eligibility for and dismissal of a bankruptcy case; claims against a debtor; treatment of executory contracts and leases; exemptions; discharge of indebtedness; and reorganizations in Chapter 11. The course material will give students a solid introduction to bankruptcy law and its application to the debtor-creditor relationship.

LAW 230. Water Resources Law. 2-3 Units.

This course introduces the legal principles that control water allocation for human and environmental purposes, taught via a combination of in-person class meetings and online exercises such as lectures, readings, videos, discussion and research. Legal principles covered include: categories of surface and groundwater rights, management approaches, allocation for environmental purposes, federal-state relationships, tribal and reserved rights, reasonable use, waste, and the public trust doctrine. Students gain practical understanding of water allocation and use in contemporary society, as well as critically examine the social policies that govern water management. Classes will meet in Classroom A on Mondays and Thursdays; other instruction will be in an online format, with support from the professor, structured to provide regular interaction with the professor and other students. Students are precluded from enrolling in this course if they have completed Water Resources Law in a different format.

LAW 232. Foundations of Water, Natural Resources and Environmental Law Practice 1. 2 Units.

An introduction to the natural water cycle and human efforts to divert, extract, store, transport and govern water. Topics include: hydrology and hydrogeology; water systems modeling; environmental uses of water; governance and operation of water systems; the design, construction, operation and maintenance of water diversion, pumping, storage, delivery and treatment systems; water chemistry and water re-use. (Open to J.D. students and practitioners with the permission of the Program Director) Prerequisite: PRIOR OR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT IN LAW 230 OR LAW 621, OR THE EQUIVALENTS.

LAW 235. Water Environmental Law Practice B. 3 Units.

Note: Course 237 is not a prerequisite for course 235. This case-study course helps students to develop fundamental skills necessary for administrative practice and judicial review in natural resources cases. The examples are primarily drawn from problems typically faced by water resources attorneys but with applications to a broader range of natural resources, environmental, and land-use law practices. (Open to J.D. students; Practitioners may enroll with professor permission.) Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in any one of the following courses: Water Resources Law, International Water Resources Law, Natural Resources Law, Environmental Law or equivalents. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 237. Water Environmental Law Practice A. 3 Units.

This case study course explores legal and practical challenges associated with water supply permitting for a hypothetical project involving impacts to fish and riparian habitat. Examples are primarily drawn from problems typically faced by water resources attorneys but are applicable to a broader range of natural resources and land use practices. Participants will address real-life issues related to client communication, public agency considerations, environmental review, administrative records, and use of technical experts. This course is appropriate for students seeking careers in federal, state or local agencies, private firms, non-profit organizations, and the legislative sphere. The skills learned in this course are essential for natural resources attorneys and also helpful to many practice areas including business, finance, general litigation, administrative, municipal, legislative, and others. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Water Resources Law helpful but not required. (Practitioners may enroll with the permission of the professor.) Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 240. Insurance Law. 3 Units.

Personal, property and liability insurance; governmental supervision of insurance; formation of the insurance contract; insurable interest; concealment, warranties, representations; subrogation, waiver and estoppel; incontestability; the respective rights and interests of the beneficiary, insured, insurer, assignee and creditor.

LAW 245. Land Finance Law. 2 Units.

An examination of the law of mortgages, trust deeds, land contracts, and other security interests in real property.

LAW 255. Federal Securities Regulations. 3 Units.

Students study the Securities Act of 1933 and the securities registration process, statutory and administrative exemptions from registration, and civil liabilities; reporting requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; the role of the Securities and Exchange Commission; and the ethical obligations of securities lawyers. Prerequisite: Business Associations (Practicum).

LAW 257. Business Transactions: The Art of the Deal. 2 Units.

This experiential course focuses generally on negotiation and drafting components found in typical business transactions, including due diligence investigation, representations, warranties, indemnifications, provisions related to the allocation of risk of loss dispute resolution. With guided instruction, and through individual and team exercises, students develop effective mechanisms for managing long-term contractual relationships, analyze deal documentation, consider negotiating strategies, negotiate and draft typical components of business agreements, including leases, licensing agreements, purchase and sale agreements, employment and non-compete agreements. Enrollment limit. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: LAW 150 and LAW 151 (Practicum).

LAW 258. Securities Enforcement. 1 Unit.

This course examines the regulatory framework of the Securities Enforcement process. Primary emphasis is on the SEC Enforcement Division’s jurisdiction and investigative procedures as well as the role of defense counsel. The course examines insider trading, financial fraud, and Ponzi Schemes with an analysis of the current trends in Securities Enforcement and parallel criminal investigations conducted by the SEC with the Department of Justice.

LAW 260. Commercial Law. 3 Units.

This course covers Articles 3, 4, 4A, and 5 Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), as well as federal statutes and regulations pertaining to the creation and transfer of negotiable instruments and liability of parties thereto, bank deposits and collection, wholesale funds transfers, electronic funds transfers, and letters of credit. Also discussed is Article 9 UCC pertaining to the creation of security interests in personal property and fixtures and the sale of accounts and chattel paper, the validity of such interests as against third parties, requirements for perfection, priorities among competing interests, rights to proceeds of the collateral, and rights and duties upon default of the secured debt. Article 6 UCC pertaining to bulk sales, and Article 7 UCC pertaining to title is also considered.

LAW 261. Sales of Goods. 3 Units.

This course covers all stages of contracts for the sale of goods in domestic and international transactions including documentary sales and electronic transactions. Focus is upon existing Article 2 and revised Article I of the Uniform Commercial Codes. Selected coverage of certain aspects of article 2A and revised Article 5; of acts dealing with electronic communications; of federal consumer protection acts; and of the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.

LAW 264. Commercial Real Estate Transactions. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the structures and execution of commercial real estate transactions. Through a team approach, students will learn about choice of entity and basic income tax; purchase and sale transactions; escrow and title; leases and other operational considerations; real estate finance transactions; and foreclosure and anti-deficiency limitations. (Practicum) Federal Income Taxation (LAW 300) and Business Associations (LAW 151) are strongly recommended.

LAW 265. Copyright Law. 2-3 Units.

This course explores ownership rights in expressive information and contrasts these rights with ownership interests in technological information; students study what information is protected by copyright from entertainment to computer based information structures; the rights of a copyright owner including the rights to make copies, transfer copies, perform and display works and the right to make derivative works, as well as moral rights in a copyrightable work; statutory exemptions from copyright in the form of compulsory licenses; as well as common law based licenses for fair uses; duration of protection and other technical rules; and international copyright protection through the Universal Copyright Convention and the Berne Convention.

LAW 266. Patent Law. 3 Units.

This course covers introductory and intermediate materials concerning invention protection mechanisms. Patent prosecution and litigation matters are stressed; alternative trade secret protection schemes are developed. Relevant statutes, case law, Patent and Trademark Office procedures, and patent application drafting are included.

LAW 267. Patent Prosecution. 2 Units.

This course examines the core requirements and strategies for prosecuting a patent application before the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (PTO). Classes provide the opportunity to draft patent claims and their supporting disclosure, conduct inventor interviews and other preparatory fact investigations, and respond to the most common types of US PTO rejections of patent applications; and cover some advanced topics. Prerequisite is either concurrent enrollment or completion of either LAW 275 or LAW 266. Limited enrollment.

LAW 275. Survey of Intellectual Property Law. 3 Units.

An introductory survey of federal and state laws which regulate trade practices is presented, including an examination of patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret law; deceptive advertising and product disparagement; federal and state consumer protection laws; and the right of publicity.

LAW 280. U.S. Antitrust and International Competition Law. 2 Units.

This course will introduce general principles of United States antitrust and global competition law through a series of case studies comparing U.S. and European Union actions against alleged cartels, monopolies and mergers. This course is designed to be a substitute for the traditional domestic U.S. antitrust law course and assumes no prior grounding in the topic.

LAW 285. Trademark Law. 2 Units.

This course examines the common-law and statutory laws governing the protection of business identity, including laws for the protection of trade names, trademarks, service marks, trade dress, product configuration, and domain names. Methods for selecting and protecting trade identity, including procedures for registering marks with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and applicable litigation and licensing strategies are also explored.

LAW 290. Computer and Internet Law. 2-3 Units.

This course explores the various methods of protecting computer technology through application of principles of contract, patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret law. It also examines the business and legal problems that confront those who use and rely upon computers and the Internet in the conduct of their businesses. Standard legal agreements used in computer and Internet industries, as well as uniform laws governing computer and Internet transactions, are discussed.

LAW 297. Sports Law. 2 Units.

Considers key legal issues affecting professional sports industry, including application of antitrust laws and the effect of industry-wide collective bargaining agreements. Varying practices and their ramifications are studied for baseball, football, basketball, and hockey.

LAW 299. Entertainment Law. 2 Units.

Considers key legal issues affecting the entertainment industry. Varying practices and their ramifications are studied for movies, television, live theater, music, and print publishing. Prerequisite: LAW 265.

LAW 300. Federal Income Taxation. 3 Units.

This course covers the fundamentals of federal income taxation with emphasis on the taxation of ¬individuals. Subject areas include gross income, assignment of income, exclusions, gains and losses, deductions, nonrecognition transactions, and income tax accounting. Special consideration is given to issues of tax policy and the development of skills necessary for working with the Internal Revenue Code. (Practicum).

LAW 302. Estate and Gift Tax/Estate Planning. 3 Units.

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of Federal transfer taxation, including the estate tax, the gift tax, and the generation skipping transfer tax, and a study of the planning techniques utilizing lifetime and testamentary transfers, life insurance, and other vehicles to best achieve the intentions of the owner as to the disposition of accumulated wealth. Prerequisite or Concurrent Enrollment: LAW 170.

LAW 303. Law and Economics of Wine. 1 Unit.

This short course on the law and economics of wine begins with an introduction to microeconomics and the cost-benefit analysis of exogenous policy shocks using wine as an example. Students look at shifts in alcohol policy from a behavioral economics perspective and consider the unique legal challenges faced by the wine industry within the changing landscape of the American three-tier alcohol regulation system. Finally, students undertake a practical review of modern California and US wine law.

LAW 304. Mental Health - Policy and Law. 2 Units.

This course is designed to expose students to legal and policy current issues arising in the context of government regulation and treatment of persons with serious mental health problems. Course coverage includes such issues as involuntary civil commitment, predictions of dangerousness, assessment of competency, the rights to treatment and to refuse treatment, and the relationship between mental health diagnoses and criminal responsibility and punishment. Students will undertake a substantial research and writing project.

LAW 306. Transnational Lawyering. 2 Units.

This course offers a practical introduction to the global legal order. Through a series of lectures and exercises, students will explore how lawyers navigate the intersection between the world’s legal systems, as well as the challenges presented by intercultural practice. Students will learn about the structure and sources of international law, the relationship between international law and domestic law and practice, and key distinctions among the common law, civil law, and Islamic legal systems. (Practicum).

LAW 307. Water and Environmental Research Seminar. 2-3 Units.

California faces serious challenges related to diminishing water supply and the deterioration of environmental quality and ecological systems. This course will provide students with a primer in databases and sources relevant to interdisciplinary research. Students enrolled will receive supervision and instruction in conducting legal research and drafting legislative and regulatory proposals informed by scientific data. Students will produce research materials that provide objective recommendations for the direction of California water and environment law and policy. Enrollment limit. Prerequisites. Successful completion of any of the following courses: Administrative law, Environmental law, International Environmental Law, International Water Resources Law, Land Use Law, Natural Resources Law, Water Resources Law, Water and Environmental Practice A or B.

LAW 308. Art of Plea Bargaining. 1 or 2 Unit.

This skills-based course will be comprised of lectures, demonstrations, role-plays and simulated motion practice and will focus on interpersonal communication used by criminal trial attorneys in negotiations at each stage of litigation in state and federal court. The course will include plea bargaining, charge and sentencing issues, written and oral motion practice and tactical and ethical considerations in the context of negotiating for clients. (Limited Enrollment.).

LAW 310. Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders. 3 Units.

Students study the federal income taxation of corporations and their shareholders, including formation and capital structure, dividends and other corporate distributions, redemptions, liquidations, and reorganizations. Prerequisite: LAW 300 (Practicum).

LAW 314. Taxation of Partnerships and S Corporations. 3 Units.

This course focuses on federal income tax treatment of pass-through entities, including partnerships, limited liability companies, and S corporations and their owners, dealing with classification, formation, allocations, distributions, liquidations, and reorganizations. Prerequisite: LAW 300 (Practicum).

LAW 325. Taxation of Real Estate Transactions. 3 Units.

Students study federal income tax treatment of real property dispositions, including gifts and bequests, sales of a principal residence, like kind exchanges, involuntary conversions, and deferred payment sales. Consideration is also given to the determination of gain and loss, encumbrances on real property, treatment of capital gains and losses, limitations on tax shelters, and the alternative minimum tax. Prerequisite: LAW 300 (Practicum).

LAW 375. U.S. Taxation of International Transactions. 3 Units.

The course covers the application of federal income tax laws to U.S. citizens, residents, and corporations investing or doing business without the United States and nonresident aliens and foreign corporations investing or doing business within the United States. The course emphasizes fundamental issue of cross-border activities, including jurisdiction to impose tax, source of income provisions, foreign tax credit, income tax treaties, U.S. anti-deferral regime, transfer pricing, and nonrecognition transactions with foreign entities. (Practicum).

LAW 400. Advanced Criminal Procedure. 2 Units.

Students study the criminal process from the initial court appearance through sentencing, with particular emphasis on constitutional issues such as double jeopardy, jury trial, discovery, the plea bargaining process, and procedures relating to the preliminary hearing and to sentencing. Prerequisite: LAW 165.

LAW 401. Comparative E.U. and U.S. Constitutional Law. 1 Unit.

The course introduces the treaty that creates the European Union, organizes its institutions and establishes its competencies. The course compares the EU with the U.S. Constitution and its institution, such as separation of powers, rule of law, democracy and citizen rights.

LAW 402. Municipal Innovation Seminar. 2 Units.

Government ethics laws seek to ensure that private interests do not play a role in a public servant’s decision-making. Students will examine rules regarding economic or personal conflict of interests; gift limits; campaign disclosure and finance restrictions; financial disclosure requirements; open government and public meeting requirements; and rules regulating lobbyists. The first part of the seminar examines why we have ethics rules, their development under constitutional and State law, and the state ethics rules that apply to local governments, examining select local ethics codes expanding on these requirements. In the second part of the seminar, students will meet weekly in groups to research and then draft a section of a model local Ethics Code to be offered to municipalities as a model and to be published on the website of the Capital Center. Enrollment limit.

LAW 403. Corrupt Foreign Practices. 1 Unit.

This interactive course will focus on corrupt practices in international commerce and finance. Students will learn about the interaction between local anti-corruption and similar legislation and long-arm legislation affecting the conduct of business, such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the UK Bribery Act. The course will also examine compliance and training programs designed to prevent corruption and similar practices and, whistleblowing regimes and internal investigations designed to uncover illegal activity where the compliance and training programs have not been successful. The course will involve practical experience in analyzing corrupt practices, advising on the legal consequences and the course of action for the client in the event such activity does occur. (Practicum).

LAW 404. Global Infrastructure Development. 1 Unit.

This interactive course introduces students to the challenges facing global infrastructure development. Once the sole responsibility of government, public finances are insufficient to undertake the investment needed to keep pace with growing demand. Governments are increasingly looking to private capital to fill the void. The World Bank, export credit agencies and other multilaterals, along with state-owned infrastructure banks, play an important role in financing infrastructure projects, but that too is insufficient to fill the growing finance gap. This introductory course will examine the traditional roles of public sector and multilateral development institutions in infrastructure development and explore different approaches for increasing private sector participation; including an overview of contractual arrangements. (Practicum).

LAW 405. Worker's Compensation Law. 2 Units.

This course will examine case law and the statutory, regulatory framework of the California Worker’s Compensation system. Students will study employment relationships, causation of injury, benefits, procedure and practice, including trial preparation and appellate review. Classroom exercises and assignments will involve real-life scenarios that require students to use critical thinking and analysis to develop advice and strategies for potential clients (injured workers, employers and insurers). Students will develop a working knowledge of this complex system which covers all California workers and their employers. (Practicum).

LAW 410. White Collar Crime. 2 Units.

This course is an examination of substantive and procedural issues that arise in the investigation and adjudication of various business crimes, including the methodology for identifying criminal intent in business activity, corporate liability for acts of employees, corporate officer liability for acts of corporate agents, strict liability of corporate officers for hazardous work place conditions, constitutional and common law privileges of business entities, the operation of the investigative grand jury, immunity, searches of business premises, and the interplay between civil and criminal proceedings.

LAW 420. Advanced Torts. 2 Units.

This course is in-depth analysis of tort issues not covered or not covered in-depth in the first-year torts course. The course will focus on business torts, defamation, privacy, and issues pertaining to joint tortfeasor liability.

LAW 432. Employment Law Practice. 2 Units.

This course is designed to build upon the legal principles taught in Employment Law. The course provides the student with opportunities to apply employment law principles in legal advice and counsel scenarios, including a focus on the intersection of various leave laws, workplace investigations, workplace policy revisions, and employee discipline. Employment Law is required. (Limited Enrollment.).

LAW 433. Employment Law. 3 Units.

Students study the creation and termination of employment relationships; employment discrimination; regulation of wages, hours and conditions of employment; occupational safety and health regulation; workers’ compensation, and unemployment insurance. (Excludes union representation and collective bargaining- See LAW 555) (Practicum).

LAW 434. California Employment Law Practicum. 2 Units.

Building on previous studies in Employment Law, this practicum introduces students to the particular issues faced by employment lawyers in California through extensive use of simulations. Students will engage in practical exercises on topics such as offers of employment, employment handbooks and policies, wage and hour evaluations, sexual harassment and investigations, administrative and civil complaints, and other documents used in employment litigation. Evaluation is based on numerous writing projects submitted throughout the term. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: LAW 433.

LAW 440. Family Law. 2-3 Units.

This course focuses on the changing definitions of “family” and “marriage:” pre-marital agreements; unmarried couples; domestic partnership; dissolution of marriage and domestic partnership; annulment; financial consequences of dissolution; parent-child relations; custody of children and visitation; child support and spousal support; domestic violence; child maltreatment; and adoption. (Practicum).

LAW 441. Trial Skills in Family Law. 2 Units.

This experiential course provides intensive training in trial skills in family law. The practice of family law includes divorce, child custody, property division, support, adoption, paternity, and domestic violence. When family law cases go to trial, the successful attorney must have a sophisticated knowledge of both family law and advocacy. The course combines lecture and class discussion with hands-on role plays and exercises in trial skills. Enrollment limit. Prerequisite: LAW 440. (Simulation).

LAW 442. Alternatives to Litigation in Family Law. 2 Units.

This experiential course integrates family law theory and mediation practice with business development. Family law practice is changing to increasingly favor out-of-court dispute resolution. To succeed in the emerging field of cooperative divorce, an attorney must have technical, emotional, marketing and business skills. This course combines lecture, lab activities, and role play exercises, elevating basic mediation skills and family law knowledge to explore the unique and varied skill set required to build - and enjoy, a cooperative divorce practice. Prerequisite: Family Law. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 450. Juvenile Law. 2 Units.

This course includes an in-depth analysis of issues relating to juvenile court procedure and practice, including delinquency, child abuse and neglect, and termination of parental rights. Students learn about the role of the attorney in the juvenile court.

LAW 465. Federal Habeas Corpus. 3 Units.

Students study state and federal habeas corpus proceedings and policies, including the history of the “Great Writ;” the complex requirements for habeas corpus proceedings; the exhaustion doctrine; cognizable claims; legal representation; nature of the proceedings and relief; ¬successive petitions; and recent changes in the law.

LAW 480. Capital Punishment Law. 3 Units.

This course is a study of the constitutional and systemic issues related to the death penalty, including: jury selection; restrictions on death-eligible crimes and offenders; aggravating and mitigating evidence in penalty proceedings; victim impact evidence; the appellate process and collateral attack; methods of execution; clemency; and international issues in death penalty cases, such as the application of treaty law and extradition issues.

LAW 490. Expert and Scientific Evidence. 2 Units.

This course introduces students to the theories underlying expert and scientific evidence as well as practical strategies for developing, discovering, presenting, cross-examining, and impeaching such evidence. Students examine the pertinent rules of procedure and evidence, as well as their application to a wide range of forensic disciplines, including biology, chemistry, computer analysis, criminalistics, engineering, mathematics, medicine, psychology and physics. Students also participate in practical presentations. No scientific background is required Prerequisite: LAW 174 or LAW 175.

LAW 500. Administrative Law. 3 Units.

Students study the practices and procedures of administrative agencies; jurisdiction and judicial review applicable to administrative agencies; scope and effect of their decisions; legislation applicable to administrative agencies.

LAW 501. CA Enviro. Cases & Places. 1 Unit.

This course will center on a three-and-a-half-day field trip that will take students to world-class teaching locations in eastern and southeastern California. The field trip will employ a truly unique, interdisciplinary approach that will help students experience the locations we will visit from two distinctly different perspectives – law and environmental science. The field trip follows a 1,000-mile loop from Sacramento, east over the Sierra Nevada to South Lake Tahoe, then down I-395 to Mono Lake and then southeast to the dustbowl of Owens Dry Lake, Death Valley, and the Mojave Desert, and then finally back to Sacramento via the farmlands of the Central Valley. The list of locations we will visit during the trip reads like a who’s who of California’s most interesting (and vexing) environmental problems. Upon registration in CA Environmental Cases & Places, students will be charged a $200 fee for travel related expenses.

LAW 503. Legislation and Statutory Interpretation. 3 Units.

In this age of statutory proliferation, an understanding of how courts interpret statutes is a crucial skill every attorney should possess. The dominant purpose of this class is to train students to make effective statutory interpretation arguments on behalf of their clients. Through a combination of exercises and cases, the class explores the academic and judicial debate concerning appropriate methods of statutory interpretation. In addition to studying the legislative process, students will learn different devices that are used in the interpretation of statutes, such as canons of construction, legislative history and precedent, as well as different theories of statutory interpretation, such as textualism, dynamic statutory interpretation and purposive interpretation. (Practicum).

LAW 506. Law and Literature. 1-2 Units.

This reading course focuses on the representation of law, lawyers, and legal and ethical issues in world literature. Each seminar participant is required to prepare a presentation on one of the pre-selected ¬literary works and to discuss (i) how the law and lawyers are presented in the work; (ii) what legal, socio-political or ethical problem(s) the work highlights; (iii) how the work resolves the problem(s), if at all; and (iv) how the work might influence a reader’s understanding of the law. Participation in the seminar is limited to ten students, who are expected to choose one of the designated works prior to the beginning of the program. Grading will be based upon the student’s presentation and a short summary paper.

LAW 507. Environmental Law. 3 Units.

This course is a survey of legal principles and policies relating to protection and enhancement of the physical environment. Particular attention is given to common law doctrines and public rights and remedies; federal and state control programs for the fields of air pollution, water pollution, noise, solid waste management, fish and wildlife resources; planning for federal, state and local administrative agencies.

LAW 508. Law and Politics. 2 Units.

This course will focus on lawyers, courts and legal doctrine as political agents and will explore the various dimensions of effecting political and social change through law and lawyers. The materials will be drawn from political science, history, the legal academy, public policy, and political theory. The substantive topics will include the role of lawyers in the political process, judicial decision-making and processes, law as a tool for political change, and law as a tool for social control.

LAW 509. Special Topics in Environmental Law. 2 or 3 Units.

This course will explore a specific field or issue in environmental law. The particular focus of the course, course requirements, and any prerequisites will be provided in the registration materials for the semester in which the course is offered. Students will be required to complete a substantial scholarly paper. Priority will be given students pursuing the Environmental Law Concentration. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: LAW 507.

LAW 510. Natural Resources Law. 3 Units.

Students examine the law and policy relating to the use of federally owned lands for the production or enjoyment of various natural resources. Major themes include the history of federal public land law and policy, the jurisdictional authority of the federal government and the states over public lands, and the respective roles of the federal legislative, executive and judicial branches in formulating and enforcing natural resources law and policy. Specific natural resources considered include water, minerals, timber, grazing, wildlife, recreation, and the preservation of historical and environmental values. (Practicum).

LAW 511. Climate Change Law & Policy. 2 Units.

LAW 513. California Lobbying & Politics. 2 Units.

This course explores how power and influence operate in the California Legislature. The first part of the course examines the processes and pressures a California legislator typically encounters prior to casting a vote in the Legislature, including campaigns for local and state office; fundraising; the influence of political parties and partisan leadership; grassroots supporters; and Sacramento-based interests. The second part of the course develops theories of legislative persuasion, including a blend of traditional advocacy skills and political strategy. The course includes a mock legislative hearing exercise at the State Capitol.

LAW 514. Drafting Laws and Regulations. 2 Units.

Students gain practical experience in reserching, drafting, and pursuing adoption of California state legislative and regulatory proposals. Students participate in a weekly meeting to present the results of their team collaborations with other students outside of the classroom and to receive feedback from the professor and fellow students. Students are responsible for identifying a client in need of a state law change, analyzing the deficiencies in current law and practice, drafting proposed statuses or regulations, refining the proposals to reflect public affairs and political realities, crafting a strategy for effectuating the change, and pursuing adoption of their final proposals in the California Legislature or an administrative agency. Activities include preparing briefing materials, presenting proposals to the appropriate governmental offices, assembling a grassroots and support coalition, seeking favorable media coverage, lobbying for change, meeting with opposing parties to discuss their concerns and negotiate changes, and participating in public hearings. By the end of the course, students are expected to have demonstrated competence in devising and executing a realistic strategy for passing legislation or petitioning a state government department to adopt a rule change. Admission into the year-long clinic is by an application process, and preference will be given to students pursuing a Capital Certificate in Public Law and Policy. Enrollment limit. Year-long (4 Graded, 2 per semester).

LAW 515. Conflict of Laws. 3 Units.

Students study the law applicable to private interstate and international transactions. Domicile, jurisdiction, recognition of foreign judgments and family law matters (divorce, annulment, alimony, custody) as well as choice of law problems in torts, contracts, and other transactions are covered.

LAW 517. Statutes and Regulations. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to strategies and techniques for interpreting and applying statutes and regulations in the modern administrative state. Topics include foundational issues important to public law, such as the legislative process, doctrines of statutory interpretation, the structure of administrative law, and the role of agencies in interpreting and enforcing statutory schemes.

LAW 518. Public Authority in Use. 2 Units.

Examines capacity for effective authoritative decisions beyond single jurisdictions or agencies, such as joint powers authorities, MOUs, contracts, statutes or court determinations (e.g., preemption) and others. Also examines devices for joint actions across sectors or which seek to direct individual behaviors.

LAW 525. Alternative Dispute Resolution. 3 Units.

Examination of alternative methods ­available to solve common legal problems, including negotiation, mediation, arbitration, med-arb and fact-finding; form of each device, advantages and ­disadvantages, legal issues regarding use, and practice techniques are all reviewed.

LAW 526. Mediation. 2-3 Units.

This course provides functional knowledge of the power and practice of mediation, which is increasingly being used to resolve both litigated and non-litigated disputes. Mediation employs a natural third party, the mediator, to help disputing parties make better decisions concerning whether and how to settle a dispute. This course examines the theoretical, legal, ethical, and practical aspects of mediation through lecture, discussion, video simulations and extensive interactive exercises and role-plays. Students will learn to conduct mediations in step-by-step process. This course also covers how to represent a client effectively in mediation and explores appropriate applications of mediation. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 528. Online Dispute Resolution. 1 Unit.

Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) is an experiential class designed to introduce professional skills related to the use of technology as part of an alternative dispute resolution (ADR) practice. Students will engage in classroom work and discussions to become familiar with the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on ADR practice and ethics, but the bulk of the course time will be spent using ICT applications and interacting with the instructor and fellow students regarding the appropriate use of ICT. Course work will demand that students engage in collaborative efforts to assess and use ICT in work with case fact patterns. Feedback will be in the form of group de-briefings, and in direct feedback from the instructor. (Simulation).

LAW 533. Global Health Law. 2 Units.

LAW 535. First Amendment. 3 Units.

This course is an in-depth and comprehensive study of freedom of speech including political speech, defamation, obscenity, commercial speech and the press. Also included will be a review of governmental demand for information as well as freedom of religion, including the establishment and free exercise clause Prerequisite: Completion of LAW 161 or LAW 163.

LAW 541. Civil Rights Litigation. 2-3 Units.

This course focuses on litigation to secure constitutionally protected rights; causes of action arising under 42 U.S.C. 1983 and the Constitution; defenses and immunities of individuals and governmental entities; federal-state comity; damages and equitable relief for violations of constitutional rights; other statutory remedies for violations of Constitutional rights.

LAW 545. Federal Courts. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the interaction between the federal courts and the other branches of the federal government, and the relationship between the federal courts and the states. Representative topics include congressional control over federal jurisdiction; standing, mootness, and ripeness; legislative courts; the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme Court; federal question jurisdiction; the Erie doctrine and federal common law; the eleventh amendment; the susceptibility of government officials to injunctive relief and damages; and the abstention doctrines.

LAW 550. Immigration Law and Policy. 3 Units.

This course covers legal issues and policies pertaining to non- U.S. citizens, including the regulation of their admission into and removal from the United States, and/or their naturalization as U.S. citizens. This course critically examines how and why the rights of noncitizens who are in U.S. territory differ from the rights of citizens. These topics will be covered from various perspectives, including constitutional law, human rights, ethics and morality, and history.

LAW 555. Labor Law. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the right to organize; organization of labor unions, strikes; picketing; boycotts, collective bargaining; unfair labor practices of employers and unions; the union member and his union; the National Labor Relations Act and the Labor Management Relations Act; preemption of State regulation.

LAW 560. Land Use Planning. 2 Units.

A survey of various types of governmental controls on land use including zoning, subdivision controls, official maps, building codes and eminent domain. Prerequisite: LAW 125.

LAW 561. Representing Local Agencies. 1 Unit.

This active learning course examines the various roles of an attorney representing a local agency. These roles are studied in a variety of contexts, including public meetings, closed sessions, administrative hearings, and through the course of communications with the client. The course begins with a brief review of the structure of local governments. Through interactive team exercises and mock hearings, students develop and demonstrate appropriate responses to client issues. Students learn the distinctions between advocating for a client as opposed to providing neutral legal advice or assessing risk while gaining familiarity with the attorney-client and attorney work product privileges. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 562. Practice Skills for Eminent Domain Lawyers. 3 Units.

This experiential course focuses on the practice of California eminent domain law, including some special trail problems using a simulated case file. Students learn the theory, code structure and skills for handling California eminent domain actions from start to finish, including: (1) pre-litigation documents, (2) resolution of necessity hearings, (3) working with appraisers to establish valuations, (4) special problems of environmental contamination, relocation, and challenges to right to take, (5) common eminent domain motions including possession issues, special ethical issues involved in eminent domain actions, and (6) drafting settlement documents resulting in a Final Order of Condemnation. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 567. Election Law. 2 Units.

A case law study of the political process at the state and local levels. Areas covered include voting and representation, redistricting, minority voting rights, campaign finance, bribery, political parties and the initiative and referendum process.

LAW 568. California Initiative Seminar. 2 Units.

This course involves a detailed review of the California initiative process and specialized research techniques appropriate for understanding initiative measures. Each student prepares an objective analysis of one or more initiatives that are likely to appear on an upcoming California statewide ballot. The analysis includes a clear description of what the initiative does, whether there are serious ambiguities in the text of the initiative, and whether the initiative is likely to be held constitutional if challenged. The analysis does not include a recommendation of how people should vote or comments about the wisdom of the initiative. (Practicum).

LAW 570. Health Law. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the U.S. health care system and public policies and laws that impact both health care providers and consumers of health care. Topics covered include federal and state regulation of hospitals, physicians and managed care organizations; standards of care and medical malpractice; privacy and -confidentiality; informed consent; access to care and federal/state reform proposals; public and private financing of health care; forms of health care enterprises, and end of life issues.

LAW 572. Public Health Law. 3 Units.

Students study legal powers and duties of government to assure the conditions necessary for the public to be healthy (e.g., to identify, prevent, and ameliorate health risks to the population), and the limitations on government’s power to constrain the autonomous, privacy, proprietary, and other legally protected interests of individuals for the protection and promotion of public health. Topics covered include the foundation and scope of public health state policy powers; health promotion, persuasion, and free expression control of infectious diseases; bioterrorism; public health regulation of property and the professions; tort law’s role in public health; and obesity and the scope of public health.

LAW 573. Bioethics and the Law. 1 Unit.

This course examines the developing area of Bioethics, considering legal topics such as assisted reproduction, wrongful conception/birth/life, and death and dying. The course will also look at the regulation of research involving human subjects as well as the rationing of human organs.

LAW 576. Intro to Capital Lawyering. 2 Units.

This course introduces students to the lawyer's role in developing, modifying, implementing, advocating, and influencing public policy, including: legislation, regulations, executive orders, court orders, and other policy edicts at the national, state, and local levels. Students learn how to do policy analysis; learn the essential organization and procedures of the various policymaking venues; are able to consider and weigh strategic implications associated with the various venues and processes; conduct research using a variety of sources unique to policymaking in California and other settings; learn and develop skills for advocacy, negotiation and compromise in a policymaking setting; and practice applying course knowledge and skills to important public policy matters of the day. Students complete a project on an actual and current public policy problem.

LAW 577. Compliance in the HealthCare Industry. 1 Unit.

Healthcare regulatory compliance is a dynamic and evolving field where law and business intersect. Students will learn the basic principles of compliance, including relevant laws and regulations, and how compliance operates within a pharmaceutical organization. Using simulations and other active learning methods, students will draft compliance policies, learn how to enforce standards within a complex organization, and learn how compliance professionals use legal and business knowledge to enhance the image of pharmacy and biotech companies in American healthcare. (Simulation).

LAW 578. Navigating HR in Health Care. 2 Units.

HR professionals working in health care must become familiar with a variety of legal and regulatory issues including nursing staffing ratios, licensure and hospital privileges, accreditation, health and safety initiatives, and administering house staff programs. Classroom exercises and assignments will involve real-life scenarios that require students to use critical thinking and analysis to develop advice and strategies for HR customers. Employment Law is strongly recommended.

LAW 579. Affordable Care Act Seminar. 2 Units.

This seminar will examine the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act, exploring the objectives of the Act as well as the impact that implementation and legal challenges have had on the likelihood that the Act's objectives will be achieved. Topics will include an overview of healthcare delivery in the U.S., the Affordable Care Act's structure, legal challenges and interpretative issues such as Medicaid expansion, the individual mandate, challenges to availability of subsidies, the essential health benefits and related requirements (i.e., contraceptive mandate, preventive screenings, etc.), and current and future developments in healthcare reform. The students undertake a substantial research and writing project. Enrollment limit.

LAW 590. Animal Law. 2 Units.

This course focuses on the treatment of animals in a wide variety of contexts, including their legal classification as property, rights and remedies within the tort system for injuries inflicted on animals, the development of laws relating to commercial uses of animals, including for laboratory research, and means of protecting animals through legislation and anti-cruelty laws. The course provides an opportunity to think critically about the historical and current treatment of animals by the legal system and to consider what role law plays in determining their future.

LAW 591. Crimmigration. 3 Units.

This seminar introduces students to the principal areas of convergence between immigration and criminal law, including the history and evolution of local and federal criminalization of immigrants and those who associate with immigrants; the nascent procedural due process revolution triggered by the seminal U.S. Supreme Court case of Padilla v. Kentucky, which recognized a limited right to counsel for immigrants; and the increasingly harsh consequences of the commission of crime on immigrants. This course is for students who want to practice criminal or immigration law or anyone interested in legislation or policy-making. Immigration Law & Policy is strongly recommended as a pre or co-requisite.

LAW 600. Public International Law. 3 Units.

Students study the nature, sources and evolution of international law; relation of international law to municipal law; subjects of international law; peaceful settlement of disputes; international agreements; state responsibility and treatment of aliens; the use of force; the role of international organizations.

LAW 602. United Nations: Law and Practice. 3 Units.

This course examines the United Nations’ primary organs with respect to their roles in the development, interpretation, and enforcement of international law and the resolution of international disputes, using case studies to illuminate contemporary challenges to the exercise of these functions. Drawing on diverse theoretical perspectives about the nature and aims of the international legal system, we will conclude by evaluating proposals for UN reform.

LAW 608. International and Foreign Legal Research. 1-2 Units.

The course examines methods, strategies, and sources for international and foreign legal research. The emphasis is on developing research skills in the area of international law, although the course will also include instruction related to foreign legal systems. General topics to be covered include treaties, customary international law, international courts and arbitration. (P/F).

LAW 611. Fundamental Rights in Europe and the United States. 2 Units.

A comparative analysis of the European and American approaches to human rights. Following discussion of structural mechanisms under the European Convention on Human Rights and the U.S. Bill of Rights, selected topics are examined such as personal autonomy, free speech, freedom of the press, asylum, refugee rights and other substantive protections for liberty and property.

LAW 614. International Protection of Human Rights. 3 Units.

This course explores the law governing the international protection of human rights and the institutional mechanisms through which such protection may be achieved; Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the role of the United Nations; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; genocide, and human rights issues relating to armed conflict, refugees, and reconciliation; treaties and non-treaty arrangements, including international criminal prosecutions; European Convention on Human Rights and other regional systems of protection; activities of non-governmental organizations; enforcement of human rights standards within the United States.

LAW 616. Marijuana Seminar. 2 Units.

About half of all states in the U.S. have legalized marijuana for medical use and a small handful (rapidly increasing) have legalized marijuana for recreational use. Despite that, any use of marijuana violates federal law where marijuana remains a Schedule I drug, subject to serious penalties. This seminar explores a number of complex legal and policy questions, including an examination of drugs laws in the U.S., the failed war on drugs, the tension between federal and state law, and the hard policy questions facing legislators if a state or the U.S. legalizes marijuana.

LAW 619. International Criminal Law. 2-3 Units.

Students study International Criminal Law with an emphasis on international crimes generally associated with armed conflicts. The primary crimes studied are violations of the laws and customs of war, crimes against humanity, and genocide. The course includes historical background on the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals of post-World War II and a study of the current tribunals for adjudicating these crimes, with a particular focus on the jurisprudence of the ad hoc tribunals created by the United Nations for crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia and in Rwanda. The topics covered include the jurisdiction of the international tribunals; substantive crimes; theories of responsibility; defenses; the blending of civil law and common law legal systems; the impact of an international setting on criminal procedure issues; and the multiple forums in which international crimes are adjudicated. There will be a writing requirement for the course in the form of either a paper and/or a take-home exam.

LAW 620. International Environmental Law. 3 Units.

This course examines national, regional, and international efforts to protect the global environment, prevent transfrontier pollution, and provide for the safe transfer of hazardous substances and technologies. Particular attention is devoted to legal problems raised by attempts not only to prevent, but also to mitigate and repair (or compensate for), harm to specific resources or the environment.

LAW 621. International Water Resources Law Seminar. 3 Units.

This seminar focuses on the theoretical bases and practical application of the law governing international fresh water resources. Students study the principal cases and controversies in the field and analyze the most ¬significant global and regional instruments. Enrollment limit.

LAW 624. Legal Spanish for U.S. Lawyers. 2 Units.

This course prepares bilingual students and students who are proficient in Spanish, to represent Spanish speaking clients in the U.S. legal system, or to work in Spanish on matters involving U.S.-Latin American relations. The course introduces students to important vocabulary and emphasize skills in areas of law most likely to require lawyering in Spanish. The course also includes discussion of topics important to cross-cultural lawyering, including the use of interpreters by U.S. lawyers and the courts. (P/F or Graded) (Simulation).

LAW 625. International Business Transactions. 3 Units.

This course focuses on problems faced by the international capital market and multinational corporation, including difficulties faced in dealing with several, sometimes conflicting, national and international regulatory bodies designed to control or encourage economic development, protect investors and consumers, and allocate foreign exchange; and corporate legal techniques of foreign operation and financing. (Practicum).

LAW 630. International Banking. 2 Units.

This course is an introduction to the structure and ¬regulation of the international banking system. Topics include: the role and authority of pertinent U.S., non-U.S., and international regulators; methods of entry into U.S. and non-U.S. banking markets; types and regulation of international banking activities; risk analysis; less-developed-country lending; conflicts of public policy; foreign bank secrecy.

LAW 631. International Negotiations. 2 Units.

In this course, students will explore how international agreements are made. In tandem with a review of the law of treaties, historical case studies, and cutting-edge negotiation theory, students will participate in simulations of transnational negotiations. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 635. Transnational Litigation. 3 Units.

Students study procedural aspects of private transnational litigation in the U.S. and Europe, including jurisdiction, service of process, taking of evidence, interim ¬measures of protection and enforcement of ¬judgments. Also covered are: choice of law, sovereign immunity and a survey of the rules governing international ¬arbitration and enforcement of arbitration awards.

LAW 637. International Commercial Arbitration. 1-3 Units.

Arbitration has become the preferred means for international parties to resolve civil disputes. The course will consider the nature of international arbitration, including its advantages and disadvantages as a form of dispute resolution in the international commercial context. Other topics to be discussed include jurisdictional issues relevant to international arbitration; the arbitration process, including the conduct of arbitral proceedings and the relationship between arbitral proceedings and national court systems; and the recognition and enforcement of arbitral awards.

LAW 645. International Trade- Public Aspects. 3 Units.

This course focuses on national and international law concerning tariffs and quotas; non-tariff trade barriers including anti-dumping and countervailing duties and political and security-based trade restrictions. Coverage includes the World Trade Organization/GATT and related dispute resolution mechanisms and free trade areas.

LAW 646. International Trade Law and Development. 2 Units.

This course examines the intersection of international trade law with economic development. The World Trade Organization has traditionally defined itself as a free trade organization, but as more developing countries become active in the system, the institution finds itself grappling with the difficult question of whether and how to incorporate development objectives in its trade mandate. We will examine this “free trade” vs. “free and fair trade” debate. Topics include: The WTO as an institution – structure, function and relevant legal texts; the Doha Development Round; WTO development jurisprudence; the anti- globalization movement; and, efforts of developing countries to change the existing social order (e.g., regional trade and the New International Economic Order). An extensive research paper is required. No Pre- Or Co-Requisites Are Required.

LAW 647. International Economic Law. 2 Units.

This course serves as a broad introduction to the legal aspects of international economic relations and global economic governance, with a focus on trade and investment. The course will look at sources of international economic law, and also international actors and international financial institutions in this regime. It will additionally consider the law relating to the International circulation of goods, services and factors of production, to the protection of international investment, as well as the role of supranational institutions (WTO/ICSID) in the area of trade and investment dispute resolution.

LAW 650. European Union Law. 1-3 Units.

This course is an introductory study and analysis of substantive EC law within the framework of an understanding of the complex socio-economic and political environment within which the Treaty of Rome is implemented, starting with the reasons for the formation of the EC and the institutions of the EC, including: free movement of goods, internal taxation, quantitative restrictions, competition law, free movement of capital, services and people. The course also covers EC external relations with several countries or groups of countries.

LAW 654. European Union Law for International Business. 1 Unit.

This course provides a general introduction to EU law, in the context of how businesses typically enter the EU market. The course concentrates on key matters that international business partners will face entering the EU market and the discussion will focus on selling goods to an EU buyer, e-commerce activities aiming at the EU market, sales via an EU representative, entering the EU market via franchising arrangements, establishing a permanent presence in the EU, and related matters. This is a problem based course and students will work collaboratively to resolve challenging case studies.

LAW 657. Election Law. 2 Units.

A case law study of the political process at the state and local levels. Areas covered include voting and representation, redistricting, minority voting rights, campaign finance, bribery, political parties and the initiative and referendum process.

LAW 662. Commercial Law for Foreign Investors in Guatemala. 2 Units.

With Guatemala’s ratification of CAFTA-DR, Guatemala opened its doors not only to trade but also to foreign investment, from U.S. and other companies looking to do business in Guatemala. While the CAFTA-DR includes norms that govern the relationship between foreign investors and Member States, the domestic laws of each Member State continue to provide the central regulatory structure that governs relations among the parties, including in the areas of commerce, intellectual property, labor law, and the environment. This is an introductory course that examines the principal commercial norms that would apply to foreign investors in Guatemala, with a special emphasis on the law of contracts. The course will also introduce the topic of how the ratification of CAFTA-DR has also promoted rule of law reforms in Guatemala. This course will be taught in Spanish.

LAW 669. Lawyering Across Borders. 2 Units.

This course will prepare students with basic Spanish proficiency to represent Spanish-speaking clients in the U.S. legal system or to work in Spanish on transnational matters involving Latin America. The class will allow students to practice skills in Spanish, such as client interviewing, intake, and client counseling, through simulations and group exercises. (Taught primarily in Spanish).

LAW 675. U.S. & International Sale of Goods. 2 Units.

This course covers all stages of contracts for the sale of goods in domestic and international transactions including documentary sales and electronic transactions. Focus is upon existing Article 2 and revised Article I of the Uniform Commercial Codes. Selected coverage of certain aspects of article 2A and revised Article 5; of acts dealing with electronic communications; of federal consumer protection acts; and of the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods. Prerequisite: Contracts.

LAW 679. Spanish Language Academy. 0 Units.

Students enrolled in Lawyering Across Borders have individual tutors at a leading Spanish language school. Some hours are dedicated to working on projects for Lawyering Across Borders but typically students spend a total of three (3) to four (4) hours per day with their tutor working on Spanish conversation and grammar. This is included in the tuition of Lawyering Across Borders. Some students not in Lawyering Across Borders may want to have Spanish lessons. If the Spanish school can accommodate the requested tutoring, the student would pay the Spanish school directly. Lessons will correspond with each student's individual goals and proficiency level.

LAW 681. International Business Agreements. 1 Unit.

A practitioner’s view of a range of issues involved in different types of trans-boundary transactions which may include mergers and acquisitions; construction contracts; long term licensing or franchising agreements; financing; and sales of goods or services. (Not open for academic credit to J.D. students who have taken or are currently taking LAW 625 without prior approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or a designee).

LAW 688. Internship. 12 Units.

This course is used for candidates who are placed in a law firm for an internship. Students will earn 12 units of credit. Interns are expected to be fully integrated into the daily work of the host firm. Among the tasks normally assigned to interns are research, preparation and review of documents, client interviews, negotiations, and observing court appearances.

LAW 689. International Investor - State Arbitration. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to international investment treaty law and arbitration. Topics covered include jurisdictional issues of qualifying investment and nationality, the distinction between treaty and contract claims, the relationship between parallel proceedings in domestic and international fora, the appointment of arbitrators, interim measures of protection, transparency of arbitral proceedings, the application of substantive protection such as standards of nondiscriminatory treatment, fair and equitable treatment, observance of undertakings, and protection against unlawful expropriation, host state defenses such as necessity and countermeasures, issues of corruption and illegality, theories of the calculation of damages, and enforceability of awards against states. (Practicum).

LAW 694. International Dispute Resolution. 1 Unit.

This course surveys the wide variety of process choices in international dispute resolution. It will include a comparison between civil and common law judicial procedure and of alternative dispute resolution methods such as international arbitration and mediation. The course will examine the legal, policy, ethical, and jurisprudential issues associated with these processes. It will also address the negotiation and drafting of choice of law and choice of forum clauses, as well as of arbitration agreements. The course will be taught through case law, descriptive readings, simulation exercises, and discussion.

LAW 695. Foreign Investment and Development. 3 Units.

Consideration of various factors affecting the decision to establish or invest in a non-domestic enterprise, including constraints imposed by host country corporation, revenue and anti-trust laws, financial and monetary regulations and labor and immigration laws. Topics include: financing international development, modern concession agreements, nationalization and expropriation and business organizations.

LAW 696. European Union- Inst. & Values. 1 Unit.

This course provides an introduction to the history, structure and procedure of the various institutions of the European Union, their legislative and administrative actions and their basic values. The course will explore the relationship between European and National Laws and the communication between the respective Courts, with an emphasis on the European Court of Justice and the German Federal Constitutional Court. Students review cases and offer counter-arguments to controversial courts decisions.

LAW 697. Doing Business in China. 1 Unit.

This course is aimed at students who expect to be legal advisers to business people planning to invest in China. The instructor will take the students through the process of establishing, running, protecting and liquidating a business in China, with a focus on intellectual property protection. Substantive laws and principles will be imparted as students play roles in practicum projects such as setting up a joint venture in China, dealing with counterfeit products, and representing clients in a lawsuit. All work will be closely supervised and carefully evaluated. Students will acquire a basic understanding of the procedures and requirements related to setting up a business presence in China, the existing legal framework and strategies used to fight counterfeiting, and the advocacy skills used in a Chinese courtroom. All topics will be approached through simulated practical experiences, in which students will study facts abstracted from real cases, prepare legal documents in the required format, advise clients, and advocate for or defend clients in court. (Practicum).

LAW 699. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

This Special Topic Course offers an introduction to the history, structure and procedure of the various institutions of the European Union and the way EU law interacts with national law. On the basis of a thorough understanding of the EU’s complex institutional settings, the course will explore major political and legal developments of the recent past, both from an intra-EU as well as an external perspective . Students will discuss the state of play of the Brexit debate, the EU’s struggle to renew its legal framework for the Economic and monetary Union and the current state of play of EU/US relations with a special focus on the TTIP agreement.

LAW 700. American Legal History Seminar. 2 Units.

This course focuses on the development of the American legal system and its interaction with society and politics from the reception of English Common Law in colonial times until the present. Representative topics include causes and effects of the revolution, formation and implementation of the Constitution, slavery and civil war, industrialization and urbanization, the regulatory state, cultural pluralism, international affairs, and contemporary technological and social change. Each student conducts an independent research project into some aspect of the evolution of law in the United States through its legal institutions and influential individuals. Enrollment limit.

LAW 702. Street Law International. 3 Units.

Law students participate in a boot camp during the first three weeks of the semester and then teach practical legal trial skills to local high school students during the last 11 weeks of the course. Legal subjects include Constitutional Law, Civil Rights Law, Criminal Law, and Trial Advocacy. With guidance from the supervising high school teacher, law students teach two weekly sessions of about one hour each at a local high school, and provide mentoring and role modeling for the high school students. Law students also coach high school students for a mock trial competition to be held at the end of the semester. Students will provide feedback via e-mail to the adjunct professor. (P/F) Enrollment limit.

LAW 703. Persuasive Analysis, Strategies and Skills I. 2 Units.

Students in PASS I complete substantive review and extensive writing practice based on CA Bar Exam essay questions, receiving substantial individual written and oral feedback concerning critical reading skills and issue identification, answer outlining and time management, use of IRAC, and crafting effective rule statements, factual analyses, and conclusions. Students review selected areas of law commonly tested on the CA Bar and create substantive outlines to guide them through the writing exercises. CA Bar Exam procedures, standards, and techniques are explained and practiced. Required for students in Directed Study, but open to all students in their final year. Adaptibar MBE preparation software is required as course materials in PASS I and is offered at a discounted rate of $215. Students must enroll and purchase Adaptibar prior to the first day of class using the special link and instructions that will be available on the PASS I TWEN course page.

LAW 705. Introduction to Space Law. 1 Unit.

This course examines the international and domestic laws that govern the exploration and use of outer space. It will address property rights in outer space, the rescue and return of astronauts, liability for damage caused by space objects, the allotment of orbital slots, and other aspects of the legal regime governing governmental and private activities in space.

LAW 706. Persuasive Public Speaking. 2 Units.

This course introduces students to the many aspects of persuasive public speaking including content, word choice, and delivery. Students study the theory of persuasion through reference to historical and social science sources. Students develop public speaking confidence by practicing their skills and receiving constructive feedback. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 709. Criminal Law Defenses. 2 Units.

This course focuses on the moral underpinnings and public policy controversies of criminal law defenses. Topics include the purpose of criminal law defenses, categorization of defenses, moral/legal controversies surrounding traditional defenses (self-defense and duress), and proposed new defenses (battered-women defense, “rotten social backgrounds,” brainwashing, euthanasia). Enrollment limit.

LAW 710. HIPAA Privacy - Health Law. 2 Units.

This course provides an in-depth examination of the federal health information confidentiality regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Through projects that require problem solving and other professional skills, students learn how to identify, understand, and apply the regulations to individuals and entities falling within HIPAA; the definition of protected health information; and the HIPAA privacy enforcement process.

LAW 713. Persuasive Analysis, Strategies and Skills II. 1 Unit.

The PASS II course allows students to learn and practice the specific skills necessary to write performance tests successfully on the CA Bar Exam. Substantial individual written and oral feedback is provided to students concerning critical reading skills, answer outlining and time management, answer structure and tone, and effective analytical and persuasive use of provided facts and law. CA Bar Exam procedures, standards, and techniques are explained and practiced. Prerequisite: Completion of 703 PASS I.

LAW 723. PASS III. 3 Units.

PASS III is a three-credit, graded course that provides a head start on becoming reacquainted with three bar-tested subjects: Property, Civil Procedure, and Contracts, and will further hone bar essay writing and multiple choice skills. This course partners with Themis Bar Review to provide an online platform for course content and assessments. There is a $150 course materials fee that will be charged upon enrollment in PASS III.

LAW 745. Elder Law and Social Policy. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the broad range of legal and policy issues and options affecting older persons. Topics covered include the demographics of aging; special ethical issues when representing the elderly; Social Security, SSI, Veteran's benefits and private retirement income plans; financing health care through Medicare, Medi-Cal and the VA; housing options and long term care; the definition of legal incapacity and planning for incapacity; end of life decision making; and elder abuse. Students join UCD Medical students for joint, interdisciplinary classes. (Practicum).

LAW 747. Elder & Health Law Clinic. 3 Units.

This course is offered in conjunction with Elder Law and Social Policy and is designed to help students integrate legal theory, practice skills, and professionalism in the growing field of law and aging. Students undertake representation of the elderly in the greater Sacramento area, including family law, housing, elder abuse, advanced health care directives, powers of attorney, simple wills, and conservatorships. Students interview and counsel clients, conduct factual investigation and legal research, develop case theories and strategies, manage case files, draft documents negotiate client's positions and present or defend client's cases in court. Admission into the Elder & Health Law Clinic is by an application process. Choice of 2 or 3 units, with the approval of the professor. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in Elder Law and Social Policy. Enrollment limit.

LAW 770. Critical Race Theory. 2 Units.

This course is an examination of the intersection of race relations and legal institutions in the United States, including analysis of the effect of race on selected areas of law; the sources of ethnic and racial identity in law and society; the role of cultural differences; formal vs. substantive equality; contrasts between critical race theory and traditional theoretical frameworks; and the importance of perspective in making and evaluating the law.

LAW 780. Sexual Orientation and Gender ID. 2 Units.

This course examines the law’s treatment of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons. Topics covered include the recognition and/or regulation of LGBT sexuality, relationships, and employment. The students undertake a substantial research and writing project. (Limited Enrollment.).

LAW 801. Arbitration: Advocacy and Practice. 1 Unit.

This course focus is on the legal basis of arbitration from commencing arbitration and the arbitrators’ jurisdiction to confirming awards and vacatur. Students learn the importance of the arbitration clause or submission agreement, forum selection, arbitration provider rules and traditional litigation. The format will be interactive with simulated arbitrations, in which students will act both as advocates and arbitrators, and will experience the challenges faced by both the neutral and counsel during an arbitration. (Limited Enrollment.) (Simulation).

LAW 802. Negotiation and Settlements Seminar. 2 or 3 Units.

This course examines the theoretical, ethical, and practical skills essential to being an effective advocate in negotiations involving legal disputes. Students learn negotiation skills through lecture, discussion, video simulations, and extensive interactive exercises and role-plays. Students are introduced to negotiation tools and techniques that enhance negotiation success. This course helps students identify strengths and weaknesses in personal negotiating style. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 803. Advanced Legal Research - Blended. 2 Units.

This course is an in-depth examination of the principles, techniques, and sources of legal research taught via a combination of in-person class meetings and distance education. Students gain an understanding of research strategies through in-person and online lectures, readings, videos, discussions, and research exercises. Students complete multiple fact-based assignments as well as a final examination. There is ample interaction with the professor and other students both inside and outside the formal structure of the course throughout its duration, and ample assessment of student effort and learning throughout the course. Students are precluded from this course if they have taken Advanced Legal Research in a different format. (P/F) Enrollment Limit. (Practicum).

LAW 804. Criminal Pretrial Litigation. 2 Units.

This course includes lectures, demonstrations, and extensive student participation in all phases of criminal pretrial litigation: investigation, client and witness interviewing and preparation, case evaluation, charging decisions, discovery, pretrial hearings including grand jury and preliminary hearings, pretrial motions, plea negotiations, sentencing considerations, and ethical considerations in all phases. Students draft documents pertaining to all aspects of criminal pretrial practice. (Simulation).

LAW 806. Honors Legal Writing Seminar. 2 Units.

This limited-enrollment graded course is designed for students with demonstrated strong writing ability and a desire for greater writing sophistication. The emphasis will be on rhetorical approaches to legal writing, including principles of organization, clarity, and style. Students will write almost weekly assignments, some of which will be critiqued and graded by the professor, and many of which will be used as the basis for critique and suggestion from all the members of the seminar. Students will be invited to apply based on past performance in LAW 122 and on the appellate brief in LAW 182. (Limited enrollment).

LAW 807. Advanced Appellate Advocacy Seminar. 2 Units.

This course is required for students competing on Moot Court teams. It focuses on advanced theory and practice of appellate advocacy, including the appellate process, preparation of appellate briefs and presentation of oral arguments; Enrollment must be approved by course instructor and is limited. All students will prepare two appellate briefs while participating in interschool competitions. Prerequisite: Global Lawyering Skills II, unless waived by the professor.

LAW 809. Civil Pretrial Litigation. 2 Units.

This course includes lectures, demonstrations, and extensive student participation in simulations concerning all aspects of civil litigation before trial with particular emphasis on strategies for efficiently securing favorable outcomes. Areas of coverage include: early informal investigation, identifying a “theory of the case,” how case theory affects formation of a discovery plan, selecting among informal and formal discovery choices, choosing deponents, tactics of taking and defending depositions, preparing interrogatories and interrogatory responses, tactics of propounding and responding to other discovery requests, options for resolution of discovery disputes, evaluation of potential pretrial motions for full or partial summary adjudication, and pretrial submissions. Students draft documents pertaining to all aspects of civil pretrial practice. (Simulation).

LAW 812. Trial Advocacy. 3 Units.

This course is designed (a) to make students competent in the basic skills of courtroom jury trial, (b) to enhance student’s knowledge of the rules of evidence by application in the trial context, and (c) to enhance students capabilities in public speaking and persuasion. The course deals with all phases of trial work including voir dire of jury panel, opening and closing statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, and presentation of evidence (including the use of computer-based slides and exhibit displays). Ethical problems in trial practice are also considered. Each student conducts a full-scale mock civil and criminal trial. Extensive use is made of videotape for feedback and critique. Open to all students currently enrolled in or having completed one of the following: LAW 174, LAW 175 or LAW 176. (P/F or graded, at the student’s option, which must be declared by the end of the first week of the course.) (Simulation).

LAW 812L. Trial Advocacy - Lecture. 0 Units.

This course is designed (a) to make students competent in the basic skills of courtroom jury trial, (b) to enhance student’s knowledge of the rules of evidence by application in the trial context, and (c) to enhance students capabilities in public speaking and persuasion. The course deals with all phases of trial work including voir dire of jury panel, opening and closing statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, and presentation of evidence (including the use of computer-based slides and exhibit displays). Ethical problems in trial practice are also considered. Each student conducts a full-scale mock civil and criminal trial. Extensive use is made of videotape for feedback and critique. Open to all students currently enrolled in or having completed one of the following: LAW 174, LAW 175 or LAW 176. (P/F or graded, at the student’s option, which must be declared by the end of the first week of the course.) (Simulation).

LAW 815. Advanced Trial Advocacy. 3 Units.

This course consists of lecture (including frequent demonstrations), combined with weekly practice sessions, covering at an advanced level: case theory development (including discussion of integration of case theory with jury instructions), persuasive opening statements, organization and technique of direct examination, advanced techniques of cross examination, direct and cross examination of expert witnesses, closing argument using analogy and storytelling techniques, jury selection, complex topics in evidence, special exercises in communications, vocal arts, and movement. Prerequisite: LAW 812 OR LAW 816. (Simulation).

LAW 815L. Adv. Trial Advocacy- Lecture. 0 Units.

This course consists of lecture (including frequent demonstrations), combined with weekly practice sessions, covering at an advanced level: case theory development (including discussion of integration of case theory with jury instructions), persuasive opening statements, organization and technique of direct examination, advanced techniques of cross examination, direct and cross examination of expert witnesses, closing argument using analogy and storytelling techniques, jury selection, complex topics in evidence, special exercises in communications, vocal arts, and movement. Prerequisite: LAW 812 OR LAW 816. (Simulation).

LAW 816. Integrated Trial Advocacy. 3 Units.

This integrated course for second-year day and third-year evening students coordinates topics covered in Evidence with skills learned in Trial Advocacy. In Trial Advocacy, students learn how to analyze a trial file, construct a case theory, and practice all phases of trial. At the end of the course, students conduct a full-day jury trial. In Evidence, students learn how to analyze admissibility issues under Federal and State Rules of Evidence and work through evidentiary issues concurrently with issues raised in their skills classes, such as making and meeting objections, articulating offers of proof, and learning evidentiary foundations. The concepts taught in Evidence every week are reinforced in Trial Advocacy exercises, while skills taught in Trial Advocacy every week, are reinforced in Evidence hypotheticals. This concurrent study of evidentiary issues with their practical application in the trial setting is designed to reinforce a deep understanding of both Evidence and Trial Advocacy in context. The Integrated Course satisfies the requirement of Evidence, earning students 4-units for Evidence, and qualifies as an elective earning 3 credits for Trial Advocacy. Students who enroll in the combined course must take and complete all 7 units. (Evidence - Graded; Trial Advocacy – Optional. Graded or P/F) (LAW 174 or LAW 175 or LAW 176, Graded; LAW 812 or LAW 816, optional, Graded/Pass-Fail. Automatically enrolled in course LAW 176). (Simulation).

LAW 820. Administrative Adjudication Clinic. 2 Units.

This clinic is a comprehensive overview of administrative process through classes & simulated hearings. Students are assigned to an administrative agency to participate as an actual decision-maker. Admission into the Administrative Adjudication Clinic is by an application process. (P/F) Enrollment limit.

LAW 821. Taking and Defending Depositions. 2 Units.

This course provides students with the practical, hands-on experience of preparing for, taking and defending depositions. Using a realistic case file, each student learns to: understand the various roles of a deposition – use as a discovery tool, evidentiary support for motions and impeachment at trial; prepare for the deposition including preparing the deponent; create an outline of a deposition; take a deposition, defend a deposition and play the role of a client or witness being deposed; and draft a file memo summarizing the deposition. Each student receives in-depth feedback from the professor. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 822. Lawmaking in California. 2 Units.

This course covers the fundamental components of the legislative process, policy and ethics including legislative procedure, bill drafting and analysis, history and intent, advocacy, relationships with the executive branch, and powers and limits of the legislative branch. Students learn about statutory and regulatory lawmaking and observe the lawmaking process in action. Students draft legislation (bills and amendments) and analyses. The making of statutory law has an increasingly critical role in our legal system. This course prepares students who want to continue their studies in the legislative arena and participate in the Legislation & Public Policy Clinic.

LAW 824. Written Discovery. 2 Units.

This course introduces students to the conceptual, legal, strategic, and practical issues relating to written discovery in civil litigation. The course also teaches students how to draft and respond to special and form interrogatories, requests for admission, and demands for production in a simulated case. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 826. Negotiating Disputes Into Deals. 2 Units.

This course focuses on creative problem-solving techniques integral to a negotiator’s toolbox, examining how to create value when negotiating common disputes. The course uses a live negotiation simulation where students can develop strategies, employ bargaining tactics, and structure agreements, tools that are applicable to a wide range of negotiation contexts. Through simulation, combined with lecture and small group exercises, students negotiate a resolution to a conflict and draft a settlement agreement. Enrollment limit. (Simulation).

LAW 853. Legislative & Public Policy Clinic. 2 Units.

Students gain practical experience in researching, drafting, and pursuing adoption of California state legislative and regulatory proposals. Students participate in a weekly meeting to present the results of their team collaborations with other students outside of the classroom and to receive feedback from the professor and fellow students. Students are responsible for identifying a client in need of a state law change, analyzing the deficiencies in current law and practice, drafting proposed statues or regulations, refining the proposals to reflect public affairs and political realities, crafting a strategy for effectuating the change, and pursuing adoption of their final proposals in the California Legislature or an administrative agency. Activities include preparing briefing materials, presenting proposals to the appropriate governmental offices, assembling a grassroots and support coalition, seeking favorable media coverage, lobbying for change, meeting with opposing parties to discuss their concerns and negotiate changes, and participating in public hearings. By the end of the course, students are expected to have demonstrated competence in devising and executing a realistic strategy for passing legislation or petitioning a state government department to adopt a rule change. Admission into the year-long clinic is by an application process, and preference will be given to students pursuing a Capital Certificate in Public Law and Policy. Enrollment limit. Year-long (4 Graded, 2 per semester).

LAW 859. Small Business Law Clinic. 3 Units.

Students will gain practical experience in client interviewing, researching, case management, document preparation and other skills necessary to represent the legal needs of small business entrepreneurs. Working with a business law firm that agrees to represent clients in a pro or low bono capacity, students will participate in a weekly seminar to discuss best practices, legal and procedural issues that arise when meeting the legal needs of small business clients. By the end of the course, students will be expected to have demonstrated competence of the basic business and transactional legal skills necessary to represent the legal needs of a small business, either in the start-up process or on-going needs. Completion of Business Associations is a pre-requisite unless waived with the approval of the professor. The clinic includes a weekly, one-hour seminar. (Limited enrollment.) Graded.

LAW 865. Immigration Clinic. 2 or 3 Units.

Students will provide legal assistance to low-income clients on immigration matters and direct representation in adjustment of status & naturalization matters, such as family petitions. Admission into Immigration Law Clinic is by an application process. Choice of 2 or 3 units, with the approval of the professor. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Immigration & Naturalization Law. Enrollment limit.

LAW 874. Federal Defender Clinic. 3 Units.

Students represent indigent defendants charged with misdemeanors before Federal Magistrate Judges in the first semester, under the joint supervision of a Federal Defender and McGeorge faculty. Students hone their skills in client counseling, plea negotiation, case analysis, oral and written advocacy and trial techniques. Students conduct evidentiary hearings and many conduct full jury trials. Admission into the year-long Federal Defender Clinic is by an application process. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in LAW 895. Enrollment limit.

LAW 875. Bankruptcy Clinic. 3 Units.

The Bankruptcy Clinic provides a practical skills experience in insolvency issues and proceedings. Enrolled students interview and counsel clients, and assist clients in all aspects of case assessment, negotiation and settlement, and representation of debtors and creditors in bankruptcy proceedings in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of California. The Bankruptcy Clinic also represents both debtors and creditors in adversary proceedings including objections to discharge and other related proceedings. Choice of 2 or 3 units, with the approval of the professor. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in LAW 225 or LAW 223. Enrollment limit.

LAW 881. Legal Problem Solving for Construction Clients. 1 Unit.

Students learn practical problem solving skills and become familiar with construction law in California, using a simulated California construction project to address legal issues as they would arise on a real project. Upon completion of the course, students are able to provide competent and ethical advice to construction professionals in both public and private settings. Students work with construction contracts to learn the typical parties to such contracts, and to identify contractual provisions frequently contested in construction disputes. Students learn about the public and private works bidding process and construction claims process, and also how to draft a detailed opinion letter to a construction client. Students identify and resolve ethical issues in counseling a construction client. Enrollment limit. (Practicum).

LAW 882. California Parole Hearings and Litigation. 1 Unit.

Students learn the procedural and legal components of parole suitability hearings for life-term prison inmates eligible for parole in California. This course covers a brief history of parole, the procedures of parole suitability hearings, regulatory standards, the Governor's review of parole decisions, litigation avenues available to inmates denied parole, and judicial review of parole determinations. Students participate in lectures, in-class discussions, mock parole suitability hearings, and oral arguments challenging or defending parole decisions. Students gain an understanding of the parole process in California from the perspective of inmates, parole commissioners, victims' families, inmate attorneys, district attorneys, appellate litigators, and the Governor. (Limited Enrollment.).

LAW 886. Criminal Appellate Advocacy Clinic. 3 Units.

This clinic is a natural next step for students who have completed the GLS series, and will complement the simulated advanced experience students may obtain in the appellate competition teams. Students represent indigent clients in criminal appeals to the Third Appellate District of the California Court of Appeals. This representation is done in cooperation with CCAP, the Central California Appellate Program, which is appointed counsel for these appeals. Working in teams of two, students review the record and prepare an appellate brief. As part of the requirements of the clinic, students give a mock oral argument for one of the appeals they are handling. Admission into the Criminal Appellate Advocacy Clinic is by an application process. Prerequisites: GLS II, Criminal Procedure, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure for State Bar student certification. Enrollment limit. Prerequisites are LAW 182, LAW 165, and prior or concurrent enrollment in LAW 174 or LAW 175 or LAW 176 and LAW 105 for State Bar student certification. Limited Enrollment.

LAW 895. Federal Pretrial/Trial Litigation Seminar. 2 Units.

This course provides the podium component of a full year Federal Defender Clinic experience. Students participate in in-depth legal and case analysis, problem-solving, advocacy training, client counseling, simulated hearings and trials based on actual case files, and the preparation of motions, briefs and case analysis memoranda. Class discussions include ethical issues encountered in criminal defense work. The focus is on criminal defense in the Federal system, including how the structure and prosecution/defense roles reflect social and political values. Students are required to stay current on criminal law procedure and sentencing issues and engage in critical thinking about both legal/case strategy and broader issues raised by the representation of indigent clients. (Enrollment limited to those enrolled in LAW 874.).

LAW 909. Prisoner Civil Rights Mediation Clinic. 3 Units.

Students co-mediate Section 1983 prisoner civil rights cases with a Federal Magistrate Judge during this year-long clinic. Under Section 1983, prisoners in state prisons have the right to file a civil rights complaint seeking relief for alleged violation of rights protected by the Constitution or created by federal statute. Students learn both the theory and practice of mediation and develop the skills necessary to serve as mediators, including conducting pre-mediation meetings with both sides. Students learn Section 1983 prisoner case law and work closely with Federal District Court personnel. Admission into the year-long Prisoner Civil Rights Mediation Clinic is by an application process, and is limited to third and fourth-year students. Prerequisite: LAW 526, LAW 802, LAW 525 or a non-credit basic 40-hour mediation workshop with the consent of the professor. Enrollment limit.

LAW 912. Housing Mediation Clinic. 3 Units.

Students learn the basics of landlord/tenant law and develop the skills necessary to serve as mediators. They participate in landlord/tenant mediation simulations to prepare them to serve as mediators in landlord/tenant mediations in an innovative Housing Court pilot project funded by the Shriver Civil Counsel Act. Admission into the Housing Mediation Clinic is by an application process. Prerequisite: LAW 526, LAW 802, LAW 525 or a non-credit basic 40-hour mediation workshop with the consent of the professor. (P/F) Enrollment limit.

LAW 920. Pacific Law Review - Editors. 3 Units.

Editorial board members are elected by the outgoing board. Editors supervise the staff and make policy decisions concerning McGeorge Law Review publications. The Editor-in-Chief and the Chief Managing Editor receive three credits. All other Editors receive two credits. (P/F)).

LAW 921. Pacific Law Review - Staff. 3 Units.

Staff members are competitively selected from advanced students. Two credits are awarded on completion of a draft comment or casenote of publishable quality. One additional credit is awarded on completion of all editorial and production processes necessary for publication of a comment or casenote. The additional credit is awarded in the academic year in which the requirements for the additional credit are completed, which can be in the same year in which the initial two credits are awarded or in the following year. (P/F).

LAW 922. Pacific Legislative Law Review. 2 Units.

Students review and analyze selected California legislation. Work is performed during summer and fall. Academic credit varies. (P/F).

LAW 923. Law Review Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar is required for and limited to students selected to write a comment for the McGeorge Law Review or the Global Business and Development Journal. The seminar focuses on development and production of a law review comment including: topic selection, legal research techniques, methodological approaches, thesis development, voice and audience. Students receive instruction in editing techniques and become familiar with giving and receiving feedback on legal scholarship.

LAW 930. Pacific Mcgeorge Global Business & Development Law Journal Board of Editors. 3 Units.

Editorial board members are elected by the outgoing board. Editors supervise the staff and make policy decisions concerning publications. The Editor-in-Chief and the Chief Managing Editor receive three credits. All other Editors receive two credits. (P/F).

LAW 931. Pacific Mcgeorge Global Business & Development Law Journal Staff. 3 Units.

Staff members are competitively selected from advanced students. Two credits are awarded on completion of a draft comment or casenote of publishable quality. One additional credit is awarded on completion of all editorial and production processes necessary for publication of a comment or casenote. The additional credit is awarded in the academic year in which the requirements for the additional credit are completed, which can be in the same year in which the initial two credits are awarded or in the following year. (P/F).

LAW 932. Global Business Development Law Journal. 1 Unit.

Staff editors are selected based on an application from students in the top 75% of each upper-division class (2D, 2E, 3D, & 4D). One credit will be awarded based on completion of managing edits and technical edits for articles and student comments. The credit will be awarded in either the fall or the spring of the academic year in which the editing responsibilities are completed. (P/F).

LAW 950. Field Placement - Administrative Law. 0 Units.

Externship participants will also be required to concurrently enroll in a seminar, in which students will attend five (5) seminar meetings throughout the semester and consult with their seminar leader. Seminar-leaders may require students to keep a reflective journal or write periodic reflective essays. Additionally, seminar leaders may require a final written work product or an appropriate writing sample that is reflective of their placement.The Externship Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 951. Field Placement - Business and Tax Law. 1-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in government agencies or non-profit entities which specialize in business law, including agencies which collect state or federal taxes. Students may also choose to staff a pro bono legal assistance program which provides legal assistance to low income taxpayers who have cases pending before the State Board of Equalization. Placement site and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. Current placement sites include various sections of the California Attorney General’s Office, CalPERS, California Department of Corporations, Department of Insurance and Department of Real Estate, California’s Franchise Tax Board, the State Board of Equalization, and the IRS. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 952. Field Placement - Criminal Justice. 1-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in government agencies or non-profit entities which specialize in criminal law, including the United States Attorney, the California Attorney General’s office, and county District Attorneys or Public Defenders. Placement site and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 953. Field Placement - Environmental Law. 1-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in government agencies or non-profit entities which specialize in environmental law. Placement site and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. Current placement sites include various sections of the California Attorney General’s Office, the California Environmental Protection Agency, California Department of Water Resources and Department of Fish and Game, and the U.S. Department of Interior and Department of Justice. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 954. Externship. 3-4 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in government agencies or non-profit entities which specialize in the practice of civil law. This is an umbrella course which includes placement sites that do not easily fit into the other externship categories. Placement site and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. Current placement sites include the Yolo and San Joaquin County Counsel’s Offices, the Sacramento, Roseville and Stockton City Attorney’s Offices, California Office of Homeland Security, California Department of Education, the Pacific Justice Institute and the Pacific Legal Foundation. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 955. Field Placement - Health Law. 1-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in government agencies or non-profit entities which specialize in the practice of health law. Placement site and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. Current placement sites include California Department of Social Services, Department Managed Health Care, and Department of Health Services, and the Legal Affairs Department of the U.C. Davis Health System. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 956. Externship - Judicial. 2-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work with court research attorneys or Judges at various local California Superior Courts, or such other court(s) as the Field Placement Director may approve. Placement sites (which may include Superior Court divisions with specialized jurisdictions such as probate, juvenile or family law courts) and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student's registration. (P/F).

LAW 957. Externship - Seminar. 4 Units.

Externship participants will also be required to concurrently enroll in a seminar, in which students will attend five (5) seminar meetings throughout the semester and consult with their seminar leader. Seminar-leaders may require students to keep a reflective journal or write periodic reflective essays. Additionally, seminar leaders may require a final written work product or an appropriate writing sample that is reflective of their placement.The Externship Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 957A. Externship-Judicial. 2 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work with court research attorneys or Judges at various local California Superior Courts, or such other court(s) as the Field Placement Director may approve. Placement sites (which may include Superior Court divisions with specialized jurisdictions such as probate, juvenile or family law courts) and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student's registration. (2 Units Graded) (Must be taken with 957B 14 Units P/F).

LAW 957B. Externship-Judicial. 12 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work with court research attorneys or Judges at various local California Superior Courts, or such other court(s) as the Field Placement Director may approve. Placement sites (which may include Superior Court divisions with specialized jurisdictions such as probate, juvenile or family law courts) and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program office. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student's registration. (14 Units P/F) (Must be taken with 957A 2 Units Graded).

LAW 958. Field Placement - Special Externship. 1-14 Units.

Students will pursue unique opportunities to gain practical experience under professional supervision in placements not otherwise available through regular field placement offerings, including distant and off-shore placements. Placements may include government agencies, nonprofit entities, and limited private placements. Private placements are limited to those areas in which students are unable to gain practical experience without receiving academic credit. Private placements have included IP, Entertainment, General Counsel, Water, and Lobbying-related placements. Requires advance approval of the Field Placement Director and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. (P/F).

LAW 959. Field Placement - Government Practice. 1-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in governmental units which specialize in matters of local, state and federal government law and policy, including city and county attorney’s offices, state legislative committees, and agencies or departments which participate in or facilitate our system of representative government. Placement site and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available on the internet at the Pacific McGeorge website or in the Field Placement Program Office. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student’s registration. (P/F).

LAW 960. Field Placement - Legislative Process. 2-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in offices that are involved in the legislative process, including working with the State and Federal senators and representatives, legislative committees, lobbyist offices, and legislative offices of government agencies. Prerequisite: Legislative Process, Strategy and Ethics, unless waived by the Director of Field Placements. P/F.

LAW 961. Externship - Semester in Practice. 2-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as half-time externs (minimum of 280 hours) or full-time (minimum of 560 hours) externs during a semester under the supervision of a field placement supervisor in a court, government agency or nonprofit organization, or in a private placement. Private placements are limited to those areas in which students are unable to gain practical experience without receiving academic credit and are not otherwise available through regular field-placement offerings. Private placements have included IP, Entertainment, General Counsel, Water, and Lobbying-related placements. Students must complete pre-placement interviews with the Director of the Field Placement Program and the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs before applying to placement sites. A student’s enrollment in a half time or a full time externship must be approved by the Field Placement Director, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, and by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Half time and full time externships may have class rank requirements, and generally, are recommended only for students in the top half of their class. (Up to 7 P/F units for half-time; up to 14 P/F, or 12 P/F units and 2 graded units, for full-time).

LAW 962. Field Placement - Immigration and Related Law. 1-14 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as externs under the supervision of field placement supervisors in government agencies or non-profit entities, which specialize in the practice of immigration and citizenship law, and related legal issues such as housing, domestic violence, public benefits, employment, and human trafficking. Some of these placements require, or would welcome, bilingual ability in languages such as Spanish, Korean, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Pacific Islander languages. Current placement sites and practice descriptions are set forth in the Directory of Field Placements, which is available in the Field Placement Program office. Placement sites may include Executive Office of Immigration Review, California Rural Legal Assistance, Opening Doors, Inc., General Consulate of Guatemala, Los Angeles, General Consulate of Mexico, Sacramento, Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach Organization, Asian Law Alliance, My Sister's House, and Legal Services of Northern California. The Field Placement Director will help students find an appropriate placement, and must approve each student's registration. (P/F).

LAW 962A. Externship-Sem. in Practice. 2 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as half-time externs (minimum of 280 hours) or full-time (minimum of 560 hours) externs during a semester under the supervision of a field placement supervisor in a court, government agency or nonprofit organization, or in a private placement. Private placements are limited to those areas in which students are unable to gain practical experience without receiving academic credit and are not otherwise available through regular field-placement offerings. Private placements have included IP, Entertainment, General Counsel, Water, and Lobbying-related placements. Students must complete pre-placement interviews with the Director of the Field Placement Program and the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs before applying to placement sites. A student’s enrollment in a half time or a full time externship must be approved by the Field Placement Director, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, and by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Half time and full time externships may have class rank requirements, and generally, are recommended only for students in the top half of their class. (2 Units Graded) (Must be taken with 962B 14 Units P/F).

LAW 962B. Externship-Sem. in Practice. 12 Units.

Students will perform on-site legal work as half-time externs (minimum of 280 hours) or full-time (minimum of 560 hours) externs during a semester under the supervision of a field placement supervisor in a court, government agency or nonprofit organization, or in a private placement. Private placements are limited to those areas in which students are unable to gain practical experience without receiving academic credit and are not otherwise available through regular field-placement offerings. Private placements have included IP, Entertainment, General Counsel, Water, and Lobbying-related placements. Students must complete pre-placement interviews with the Director of the Field Placement Program and the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs before applying to placement sites. A student’s enrollment in a half time or a full time externship must be approved by the Field Placement Director, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, and by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Half time and full time externships may have class rank requirements, and generally, are recommended only for students in the top half of their class. (14 Units P/F) (Must be taken with 962A 2 Units Graded).

LAW 969. Trial Evidence. 1 Unit.

Enrollment limited to the members of the current Mock Trial Team. Trial Evidence will hone the skills of the Mock Trial Team in making and responding to evidentiary objections in the cauldron of the trial arena. The Fall competition cases will be used to isolate and analyze the likely issues that will arise. For those who have already taken Evidence this will be an intensive review. For those now taking Evidence, it will be an opportunity to learn Evidence law in context.

LAW 970. Mock Trial Team. 1-3 Units.

Students selected for Mock Trial teams prepare simulated civil and criminal jury trials, then compete regionally and nationally against other law school teams. Expert litigator-coaches train students during practices held several times a week. The course enhances the student's persuasion and advocacy skills and reinforces the integration of the rules of evidence into actual trial practice. (Simulation) (P/F).

LAW 971. Moot Court Competition Teams. 2 Units.

For Moot Court Competition Teams register under LAW 807.

LAW 972. Moot Court Competition Teams. 2 Units.

For Moot Court Competition Teams register under LAW 807.

LAW 980. LLM Legal Research, Writing and Analysis I. 2 Units.

This course covers the legal skills necessary for students whose first law degree is not from the U.S. to be successful in U.S. law school and in legal practice. Coverage includes U.S. legal systems, legal reasoning, and legal writing skills relevant to law school success, bar examinations, and legal practice, as well as legal research using print and electronic sources. Students will receive detailed feedback on their completed exercises to improve their analytical thinking and written expression. (LL.M. Students Only) (May be waived with permission of the Director of Graduate and International Programs.).

LAW 981. LLM Legal Research, Writing and Analysis II. 2 Units.

This course expands the coverage of the legal skills necessary for students whose first law degree is not from the U.S. to be successful in U.S. law school and in legal practice. Coverage includes U.S. legal systems, legal reasoning, and legal writing skills relevant to law school success, bar examinations, and legal practice, as well as legal research using print and electronic sources. Students will receive detailed feedback on their completed exercises to improve their analytical thinking and written expression. (LL.M. Students Only) (May be waived with permission of the Director of Graduate and International Programs). Prerequisite: LAW 980.

LAW 982. Trial Evidence. 1 Unit.

This course will teach students trial evidence using the case files they will be assigned in regional and national competitions. They will learn “integrated evidence/advocacy” by studying the Federal Rules of Evidence and applying them to different fact patterns. This method of integration will deepen their knowledge of the FRE and assist them in persuasive advocacy by offering and opposing evidence in trial. This course is a 1 unit graded course required for all Mock Trial team members.

LAW 986. Dissertation. 12 Units.

This course is for JSD students who are completing an approved Dissertation. (12 units, graded).

LAW 989. Master's Thesis. 6 Units.

This course is for LLM students who are completing an approved Master's Thesis project. (3 units, graded).

LAW 990. Directed Research. 1-2 Units.

Students complete comprehensive individual research projects under the supervision of a faculty member resulting in a scholarly paper. Topic and unit credit must be approved in advance. (P/F).

LAW 991. Directed Research, Graduate Level. 1-2 Units.

Graduate Level Directed Research provides the opportunity for LL.M. students to engage in a comprehensive individual research project under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The work product may take the form of a scholarly paper, empirical study, analysis of topical readings, or other creative format that demonstrates in-depth legal research and original analysis. Advanced approval of the research topic and unit credit is required. A student must submit a detailed written proposal of the research topic and obtain approval from a full-time faculty member willing to supervise the student's research. The proposal and a complete "Graduate Level Directed Research Approval Form" must then be submitted for approval to the Director of Graduate & International Programs prior to end of the registration period for the term in which the student intends to enroll in Directed Research. Directed Research must be supervised throughout the semester by a full-time faculty member. Specifics regarding supervision of the course are left to the supervising faculty member, however, the general expectation is that the student will take responsibility for ensuring that an outline, drafts, and the final project are completed by the established deadlines. A student may enroll for either one or two credit units for Directed Research. A student is expected to put in at least 50 hours of work for each credit hour. If the resulting work product is a paper, as a general rule, the student should produce a paper of approximately 15 pages in length including footnotes for one unit of credit or 25 pages in length including footnotes for two units of credit. A student is not permitted to receive credit for Directed Research for a project produced for the student's employer or for any other law school course or activity.

LAW 995. Visiting Program/Off Campus. 18 Units.

This course is used to track enrollment for students taking coursework at another institution as a visiting student.