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Conservatory of Music

http://www.pacific.edu/conservatory/
Phone: (209) 946-2415
Location: Faye Spanos Concert Hall

Giulio Maria Ongaro, Dean

Programs Offered

Master of Music in Music Education
Master of Arts in Music Therapy

The Conservatory of Music offers graduate degrees in music education and music therapy: Master of Music and Master of Arts in Music Therapy. Additionally, the Master of Education (with an emphasis in music education) is available through the Gladys L. Benerd School of Education.  The Conservatory of Music graduate programs give students individual faculty attention and opportunities to work with experts in their field. 

Graduate students in the Conservatory of Music take a range of coursework designed to enhance their musicianship and research skills. They develop advanced skills in music therapy, conducting, pedagogy, or other areas of music specialization depending on individual career goals.

Music education degrees are designed for those with a previous degree/credential in music; in general, the Master of Music includes more coursework in music, while the Master of Education includes more education courses. Applicants who have not attained a music education degree/teaching credential previously are expected to complete the credential program as part of earning their graduate degree. Building on previous music and teaching experiences, the education programs are individualized and lead to a creative, productive career in teaching music, pre-K through college. 

The Master of Arts in Music Therapy offers a choice of two tracks of study (research and clinical) that support (1) preparation for eventual entry into teaching and research careers or (2) development of advanced clinical, administrative, and program development skills. 

Comprehensive Examination

At the conclusion of the Master’s programs, all students are expected to pass a comprehensive written and/or oral examination/thesis defense on all work covered during their graduate study at University of the Pacific.

Admission Requirements

Admission to any graduate program in music at University of the Pacific is based upon both academic qualifications and musicianship, including overt musical behavior as demonstrated in performance and listening. Academic considerations for the entering Master’s student, regardless of major, are discussed in earlier pages of this catalog under Admission. 

Music Education Majors

  1. A live audition or tape of either:
    • The candidate’s primary solo performing medium.
    • A recent (within two years) example of a performance or demonstration by a school ensemble or class taught or conducted by the applicant.
    • The candidate’s original compositions (with scores).
  2. A Bachelor’s Degree in Music.
  3. Apply for and be accepted into the Graduate School.
  4. Grade point average of at least 3.0 for the last two year of undergraduate study.
  5. Successful completion of the basic aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination. (GRE). The music subject exam of the Graduate Record Examination is not required. In cases where a student has earned an exemplary undergraduate GPA (3.5 or higher), the GRE examination requirements may be waived by the Conservatory Graduate Studies Chair.
  6. Candidates must apply for and be accepted into the Graduate programs of the Conservatory of Music (and the School of Education, if they do not already possess a music education degree/teaching credential).
  7. Credential candidates must apply for and meet the admission procedures and standards of the Credential Program of the Gladys L. School of Education during the first term of attendance.
  8. Instructions regarding repertory and recording specifications are available in the Office of the Dean, Conservatory of Music and should be requested by all applicants.

Music Therapy Majors 

  1. Music Audition (live or DVD recording):
    • Candidates should prepare two contrasting pieces on their principal instrument/voice.
    • Sing two pieces from a traditional or contemporary musical repertoire with self-accompaniment on piano and guitar (proficiency on both piano and guitar is an important consideration for potential candidates). For these pieces, candidates may use sheet music or a lead sheet. 
    • Sing one American folk song from memory a capella.
  2. A Bachelor's degree in music. 
  3. Undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or better.
  4. Online application form through the Graduate School.
  5. 3 letters of recommendation.
  6. General GRE scores (GRE is not required for applicants with GPA of 3.5 or higher.)
  7. Official Transcripts

Music Education Courses

MEDU 100. Music for Children. 3 Units.

This course explores music fundamentals, resources, concepts and activities for the pre-adolescent child. This course is open to non-music majors only, and it is required for multiple subjects credential candidates.

MEDU 101. Woodwind Instruments I. 1 Unit.

Students study the principles of teaching and playing flute and clarinet.

MEDU 102. Woodwind Instruments II. 1 Unit.

Students study the principles of teaching and playing oboe, bassoon and saxophone.

MEDU 103. Brass Instruments I. 1 Unit.

Students study the principles of teaching and playing brass instruments.

MEDU 104. Brass Instruments II. 1 Unit.

Students study the advanced principles of brass instrument teaching.

MEDU 105. Percussion Instruments. 1 Unit.

Students study the principles of teaching and playing percussion instruments.

MEDU 107. String Instruments I. 1 Unit.

Students study the principles of teaching and playing violin and viola.

MEDU 108. String Instruments II. 1 Unit.

Students study the principles of teaching and playing string instruments which include the cello and bass.

MEDU 110. Band Development. 2 Units.

Students examine the teacher's role in instrumental music education which includes concert, marching, jazz band and orchestras in public schools.

MEDU 111. Choral Development. 2 Units.

Students examine the teacher's role in choral music education which includes concepts and techniques for choral ensembles.

MEDU 112. Orchestra Development. 2 Units.

Students examine the teacher's role in orchestras in public schools.

MEDU 113. Laboratory Ensemble. 0.5 Units.

This course offers laboratory experience of music education fieldwork that includes developmentally appropriate class and rehearsal skills, secondary instrument performance, vocal ensemble techniques, planning, and assessment.

MEDU 114. Music in Elementary School. 2 Units.

Students investigate the role of music within the elementary school and its environment. The course includes 50 hours of laboratory observation/teaching in the elementary schools. Corequisite: MEDU 115.

MEDU 115. Music Experiences, K-6. 2 Units.

This course offers a music specialist approach to materials and techniques that develop music experiences for elementary school children. Corequisite: MEDU 114. Open to music majors only.

MEDU 116. Music in Secondary School. 2 Units.

Students examine the role of school music in grades 6-12. The course includes 50 hours of laboratory observation/teaching. Corequisite: MEDU 117. Open to music majors only.

MEDU 117. Music Experiences, 7-12. 2 Units.

This course offers a music specialist approach to materials and techniques that develop music experiences in secondary school. Corequisite: MEDU 116. Open to music majors only.

MEDU 118. Advanced Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Units.

This course is supervised practical observation/teaching experiences in both public and private schools. Prerequisites: MEDU 114 and MEDU 116.

MEDU 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

MEDU 200. Video Microrehearsal for Music Teaching Candidates. 3 Units.

Course content includes microrehearsals, seminars, and individual and group viewing sessions to define and develop rehearsal-teaching techniques with video recording as a basic tool. Prerequisites: bachelor's degree in music and permission of Music Education faculty.

MEDU 201. Video Microrehearsal for Experienced Music Teachers. 1-4 Units.

Students study the restructuring of music teaching techniques that use video recording techniques. Other topics of study include microrehearsals, seminars, individual and group viewing sessions, and field application of new procedures. Prerequisites: bachelor's degree in music, two years of full-time music teaching in public schools and permission of instructor.

MEDU 202. Fieldwork in Music Education. 3 Units.

This course offers advanced work in schools. It may include music drama, small ensembles, unique curriculum design as well as large ensembles and class instruction.

MEDU 210. Seminar in Music Education. 2 Units.

This seminar course includes discussion, research and writing related to music education.

MEDU 220. Instrumental Organization, Conducting and Literature. 3 Units.

MEDU 221. Choral Organization, Conducting and Literature. 3 Units.

MEDU 222. Advanced Problems in Elementary Music Teaching. 3 Units.

MEDU 291. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

MEDU 293. Special Topics. 1-2 Units.

MEDU 299. Thesis. 3 Units.

MEDU 301. Video Microrehearsal for Experienced Music Teachers. 4 Units.

Students study the restructuring of music teaching techniques that use video recording techniques. Other topics of study include microrehearsals, seminars, individual and group viewing sessions, and field application of new procedures. A research component is required. Prerequisites: bachelor's degree in music and two years of full-time music teaching in public schools and permission of instructor.

MEDU 310. Seminar in Music Education. 2 Units.

This course includes discussion, research and writing related to music education.

MEDU 311. Philosophy of Music Education. 3 Units.

Students examine the development of individual music education philosophy through the study of history, aesthetics, sociology, psychology and school practice.

MEDU 312. Graduate Research in Music Education. 1-3 Units.

MEDU 313. Graduate Research in Music Education. 1-3 Units.

MEDU 322. Issues in Elementary Music Teaching. 3 Units.

MEDU 391. Graduate Independent Study. 1-3 Units.

MEDU 393. Special Topics. 1-2 Units.

Music Management Courses

MMGT 106. Sound Recording Fundamentals. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to basic audio techniques applicable to recording sound. This course is a combination of lecture, lab sessions and independent studio projects which provides a basic understanding of how audio is captured, stored and manipulated in the recording industry. (FILM)

MMGT 107. Performing Arts Administration. 3 Units.

This course is a practical approach to management and business issues that affect arts organizations. Topics include program planning, budget development, fund-raising, community relationships and concert promotion and production.

MMGT 108. Artist Management. 3 Units.

This course introduce students to the roles and responsibilities of a personal manager for a recording artist. Through reading, discussion, project-based work and taking on a working artist to advise and "manager" during the term, students have the opportunity to learn first-hand about the nature of the work of the artist manager and how to plan and execute a project for an artist. Prerequisite: MMGT 011 or permission of the instructor.

MMGT 109. Beyond Talent: Managing Performance Career. 2 Units.

This course provides students intending a career as a performer or artist with the knowledge and skills to help manage their career and image. This course combines readings, workshops, activities, and interviewing successful artists while students develop a basic promotional kit and career plan. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MMGT 111. Music Industry Analysis. 4 Units.

Using reading, research, and discussion, students investigate the evolution of the American popular music industry during the last century. Social, cultural, business and technological changes are considered. The course emphasizes critical thinking, forming and defending opinions, and clearly presenting written and oral arguments that support student-developed theses which relate to a variety of eras and themes. Coursework includes a substantial research project on a topic of the student's own choosing. Prerequisite: MMGT 011 or permission of instructor. Junior standing. (DVSY)

MMGT 120. Media Production. 4 Units.

A laboratory class in which student teams learn to capture, edit, and publish live events such as concerts, recitals, lectures, as well as community and regional music events. Students will become familiar with audio, video and streaming tools, as well as the protocol and processes of working with various stakeholders to accomplish the course learning objectives. Prerequisites: MMGT 009, MMGT 106, Junior Standing or instructor permission.

MMGT 121. Media Promotion. 4 Units.

This is a hands-on lab class in which students learn to promote designated projects for clients, such as the MMGT 120 Media Production projects, using various means including paid, owned, and earned media such as a YouTube, Facebook, Vimeo, Pinterest, Reddit, as well as traditional media outlets including print and broadcast. Program faculty designate various live events such as concerts, recitals, lectures, as well as community and regional music events. Students will become familiar with audio, video and streaming tools, as well as relevant forms of social media to accomplish the course learning objectives which primarily focus on audience-building, data analytics, measurement and evaluation of the effectiveness of various tactics and strategy used in media promotion. Prerequisites: MMGT 120, junior standing or permission of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in MMGT 120 is not permitted. Priority enrollment for major; non-majors may enroll with instructor permission, pending available space.

MMGT 130. Poplular Songwriting. 3 Units.

Students will gain a fundamental understanding of how songs are written, co-written and produced. Genre-specific songwriting and production conventions will also be addressed. Study of popular song structure, lyrics, melodic and other musical elements are included. Prerequisite: MMGT 009 or permission of instructor.

MMGT 140. Music Products Management. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the inner workings of the operations, sales and financial aspects of the music products industry. Course work includes case studies, lab sessions at a music retailer, development of a retail store start-up plan and site visits to leading regional music products firms.

MMGT 153. Entertainment Law. 4 Units.

Students study all aspects of legal relationships and rights of problems in films, television, music and records. Prerequisites: BUSI 053 and MMGT 011 or permission of instructor. Junior standing. (PLAW)

MMGT 160. Recording Studio Production. 2 Units.

This course provides students an opportunity to work independently and as part of a group learning about acoustical sound recording and digital production techniques. Classes develop sound recording and aural acuity relevant to the production of high quality music recordings. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MMGT 106 with a grade of "B" or better or permission of instructor.

MMGT 170. Topical Seminars in Music Industry Studies. 1-3 Units.

Rotating series of seminars that study various segments of the music industry. Past seminars have included topics such as concert production/promotion, music licensing and supervision, and live sound engineering.

MMGT 180. Senior Project Proposal. 1 Unit.

Students will prepare a comprehensive project proposal addressing an industry-related topic, problem or issue of concern to the student, which directly relates to their intended career path. Proposal must meet with faculty approval prior to end of semester. Graded on a Pass/No Credit basis only. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

MMGT 185. Senior Project. 1 Unit.

Students will complete and present a senior project that is based on their approved proposal from MMGT 180. Students will deliver both written and oral presentations in a public forum. Students receive a letter grade based on their overall semester’s work as well as the quality and clarity of their final project. Prerequisites: MMGT 180, Senior Standing.

MMGT 187. Music Management Internship. 1-4 Units.

This course is an opportunity for qualifying students to work in an area of the music industry that interests them. The course is coordinated with the Pacific Career Resource Center. Prerequisite: Successful completion of two courses in Music Management. Permission of faculty adviser. Graded Pass/No Credit.

MMGT 190A. Portfolio Review II. 0 Units.

Each Music Industry Studies major prepares an ePortfolio over the course of his/her study containing signature assignments from specified courses as well as other work products relevant to measuring progress toward attaining program learning outcomes as well as knowledge in the students’ area of focus. This course is a milestone review, which occur in each semester of the junior year. Each student meets bi-monthly with a faculty advisor to determine appropriate quality and relevance of portfolio contents and to receive feedback on how to maximize its impact. This course is graded on a Pass/No Credit basis only. Prerequisite: MMGT 090, Junior standing in BS in Music Industry.

MMGT 190B. Portfolio Review III. 0 Units.

Each Music Industry Studies major prepares an ePortfolio over the course of his/her study containing signature assignments from specified courses as well as other work products relevant to measuring progress toward attaining program learning outcomes as well as knowledge in the students’ area of focus. This course is a milestone review, which occur in each semester of the junior year. Each student meets bi-monthly with a faculty advisor to determine appropriate quality and relevance of portfolio contents and to receive feedback on how to maximize its impact. This course is graded on a Pass/No Credit basis only. Prerequisite: MMGT 090, MMGT 190A, Junior standing in BS in Music Industry.

MMGT 190C. Portfolio Presentation. 1 Unit.

Each Music Industry Studies major prepares an ePortfolio over the course of his/her study containing signature assignments from specified courses as well as capstone assignments and other work products relevant to measuring progress toward attaining program learning outcomes as well as knowledge in the students’ area of focus. This course is the final portfolio, which also incorporates a student presentation that is videotaped and added to the students’ portfolio. Each student meets bi-monthly with a faculty advisor to determine appropriate quality and relevance of portfolio contents and to finalize their presentation. This course is graded on a Pass/No Credit basis only. Prerequisite: MMGT 190B, Senior standing in BS in Music Industry.

MMGT 191. Independent Study. 1-2 Units.

MMGT 196. Music Industry Career Development. 2 Units.

MMGT 196 is a launch pad for seniors about to enter the music industry. Students assess current career trends, meet with leading practitioners, perform research in their specific field of interest and fine-tune their professional portfolio. Professional skill development in interviewing and presenting one's self to employers. Senior standing in MMGT of School of Business Arts and Entertainment emphasis.

MMGT 197. Undergraduate Research. 1-4 Units.

MMGT 199. Music Management Exit Examination. 1 Unit.

This class is a requirement for all students earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Music Management or Music Industry Studies within the Conservatory. This summative oral examination is administered midway through the last semester of work prior to graduation. Students planning to graduate in the fall term must make arrangements with the Program Director to enroll in the prior spring semester. Graded on a Pass/No Credit basis only.

MMGT 206. Sound Recording Fundamentals. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to basic audio techniques applicable to recording sound. This course is a combination of lecture, lab sessions and independent studio projects which provides a basic understanding of how audio is captured, stored and manipulated in the recording industry.

MMGT 207. Performing Arts Administration. 3 Units.

This course is a practical approach to management and business issues that affect arts organizations. Topics include program planning, budget development, fund-raising, community relationships and concert promotion and production.

MMGT 208. Artist Management. 3 Units.

This course introduce students to the roles and responsibilities of a personal manager for a recording artist. Through reading, discussion, project-based work and taking on a working artist to advise and "manager" during the term, students have the opportunity to learn first-hand about the nature of the work of the artist manager and how to plan and execute a project for an artist. Prerequisite: MMGT 011 or permission of the instructor.

MMGT 209. Beyond Talent: Managing Performance Career. 2 Units.

This course provides students intending a career as a performer or artist with the knowledge and skills to help manage their career and image. This course combines readings, workshops, activities, and interviewing successful artists while students develop a basic promotional kit and career plan. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MMGT 220. Media Production. 4 Units.

A laboratory class in which student teams learn to capture, edit, and publish live events such as concerts, recitals, lectures, as well as community and regional music events. Students will become familiar with audio, video and streaming tools, as well as the protocol and processes of working with various stakeholders to accomplish the course learning objectives. Prerequisites: MMGT 009, MMGT 096, Junior Standing or instructor permission.

MMGT 221. Media Promotion. 4 Units.

This is a hands-on lab class in which students learn to promote designated projects for clients, such as the MMGT 120 Media Production projects, using various means including paid, owned, and earned media such as a YouTube, Facebook, Vimeo, Pinterest, Reddit, as well as traditional media outlets including print and broadcast. Program faculty designate various live events such as concerts, recitals, lectures, as well as community and regional music events. Students will become familiar with audio, video and streaming tools, as well as relevant forms of social media to accomplish the course learning objectives which primarily focus on audience-building, data analytics, measurement and evaluation of the effectiveness of various tactics and strategy used in media promotion.

MMGT 240. Musical Products Management. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the inner workings of the operations, sales and financial aspects of the music products industry. Course work includes case studies, lab sessions at a music retailer, development of a retail store start-up plan and site visits to leading regional music products firms.

MMGT 260. Recording Studio Production. 2 Units.

This course provides students an opportunity to work independently and as part of a group learning about acoustical sound recording and digital production techniques. Classes develop sound recording and aural acuity relevant to the production of high quality music recordings. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MMGT 106 with a grade of "B" or better or permission of instructor.

MMGT 270. Topical Seminars in Music Industry Studies. 1-3 Units.

Rotating series of seminars that study various segments of the music industry. Past seminars have included topics such as concert production/promotion, music licensing and supervision, and live sound engineering.

Music Therapy Courses

MTHR 135. Music with Children in Inclusive Settings: Therapeutic and Educational Applications. 3 Units.

This course presents specific music therapy techniques and skills for development of programs for children's successful integration within home/school/community environments. Students will identify and create therapeutic music strategies to effect changes in children's academic, social, motor, and leisure skills development. This course also acquaints students with relevant music therapy/education research and current legislation regarding children within inclusive settings. Open to non-majors. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and either MTHR 018 or MCOM 002; or with instructor permission.

MTHR 140. Psychology of Music. 3 Units.

This course introduces the psychological foundations of music that include the study of acoustics, perception of sound, and physical and psychosocial responses to music. Students survey current research in music/music therapy and develop skills in applied research methodology. The course is open to non-majors. Prerequisite: MCOM 002 or permission of the instructor.

MTHR 141. Music Therapy in Mental Health and Social Services. 3 Units.

MTHR 141 examines theory, research, and clinical skills related to music therapy for adults, children, and adolescents in various mental health and social service treatment settings. It also includes an introduction to current DSM criteria for mental disorders commonly encountered by music therapists, and an overview of major theories of psychotherapy as they relate to music therapy. The course introduces music therapy techniques for group treatment which includes music improvisation, songwriting, and basic relaxation methods. This course is for music therapy majors only and it must be taken concurrently with Fieldwork in Music Therapy. Prerequisites: MTHR 011, MTHR 018, MTHR 135, and MTHR 140, PSYC 111 and completion of Voice, Guitar, and Piano competencies.

MTHR 142. Music Therapy in Medicine and Health Care. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview of music therapy with children, adults, and older adults in medical settings. Students survey theories, methods, and empirically supported treatments in settings such as acute care, physical rehabilitation, gerontology, palliative care, preventative medicine, and health maintenance. It also includes the study of physical and psychosocial processes natural to aging and end of life, and assists students in developing skills in improvised music for relaxation and palliative care. The course is for music therapy majors only. Prerequisites: MTHR 141, BIOL 011 and completion of Voice, Guitar, and Piano competencies.

MTHR 143. Supervisory Techniques. 1 or 2 Unit.

This course offers techniques in the supervision of music therapy fieldwork. The course is only open to music therapy majors by permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: MTHR 020, MTHR 140 and MTHR 150.

MTHR 150. Fieldwork in Music Therapy. 1-2 Units.

Fieldwork provides students with structured clinical experiences in music therapy under the supervision of a music therapist in varying community settings. This course repeated for credit and taken concurrently each semester students are enrolled in MTHR 135, MTHR 140, MTHR 141 and MTHR 142. Prerequisites: MTHR 011 and MTHR 018. This course is open only to music therapy majors, and a minimum of 4 units of Fieldwork (MTHR 150) is required for completion of the music therapy degree program.

MTHR 187. Internship in Music Therapy. 1 Unit.

This course consists of clinical training experience at an internship site approved by the AMTA. Successful completion of required hours and competencies allows students to sit for the Music Therapy Board Certification Examination. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all coursework and functional music skills, competency evaluation and individualized internship training plan. Students are required to enroll in MTHR 150 within the period of one year prior to the start of internship.

MTHR 191. Independent Study. 1-2 Units.

MTHR 197D. Undergraduate Research. 1-4 Units.

MTHR 230. Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music Level I Training. 3 Units.

Intensive 5-day residential seminar introduces theory and clinical applications of the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music (BMGIM) and other music and imagery techniques. Participants gain intensive personal experience with BMGIM. Hands-on experiential exercises, demonstrations, and clinical examples introduce simple imagery techniques to add to participants' existing repertoire of therapeutic interventions. This residential phase of the course meets the Association of Music and Imagery (AMI) requirements for introductory training in the Bonny Method. The on-line learning component extends and deepens the student's understanding through exposure to literature in the Bonny Method, sharing of discoveries from readings and music listening, as well as personal reflection and integration of experiential learning. Due to the experiential nature of this course, participants must be willing to participate in all learning activities and in the group sharing process, and attend all seminar sessions as listed in the residential seminar course schedule. All students and instructors are expected to maintain confidentiality of personal material shared by group members. Prerequisites: Evidence of clinical experience and permission of instructor.

MTHR 231. Individual Music Therapy: Advanced Theory and Techniques. 3 Units.

This course explores current theories and techniques of music-centered psychotherapy for supportive, re-educative/rehabilitative, and re-constructive levels of clinical practice with a variety of populations. The course includes development of therapeutic relationship through music improvisation, and focused music-evoked imagery to address supportive and re-educative goals for individual clients. Experiential learning includes classroom simulations and supervised clinical practice. Prerequisites: MTHR 187 (or an AMTA-approved clinical internship) and MTHR 230 (or Level I training in the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music) or permission of instructor.

MTHR 232. Group Music Therapy: Advanced Theory and Techniques. 3 Units.

This course examines theories and models for group music therapy with applications for a variety of clinical populations. The course includes approaches for quick group assessment and brief treatment environments. The focus in on therapist and member roles and tasks within group development processes. Students refine group facilitation skills that use music-centered techniques of improvisation and music-evoked imagery through in-class simulations and supervised clinical practice. Prerequisite: MTHR 231 with a "B" or better or permission of instructor.

MTHR 240. Psychology of Music. 3 Units.

Students examine the psychological foundations of music. Topics include the study of acoustics, perception of sound, and physical and psychosocial responses to music. Students survey current research in music/music therapy and develop skills in applied research methodology. Students enrolled for graduate credit also complete a formal research project proposal and mock IRB proposal as preparation for eventual research activities within the graduate program or professional venues. This course is recommended for graduate students in music therapy or music education, but it is open to students in other majors. Prerequisite: competency in basic music reading skills.

MTHR 245. Clinical Clerkship in Music Therapy. 1-4 Units.

As an alternate requirement for Thesis, Clinical Clerkship is designed for students who may want to focus on clinical skills and knowledge. Students complete a major project related to an applied therapeutic or educational setting.

MTHR 251. Music Therapy Supervision I: Introduction to Theory and Applications. 1 Unit.

This course provides a foundation for effective music therapy clinical supervision. It introduces multicultural, ethical, and legal considerations and explores factors unique to music therapy supervision. Readings, workbook assignments, field observations and in-class discussion of theories and techniques prepare students for MTHR 252, and practical experience supervising undergraduate students in clinical training settings. Prerequisite: MTHR 187 or an AMTA approved clinical internship.

MTHR 252. Music Therapy Supervision II: Applied Experience. 1 Unit.

This course provides mentored practice in clinical supervision and it supports individualized skill development of competencies for professional participation in clinical management and student, volunteer, or peer supervision situations. Learning experiences include direct on-site supervision of undergraduate music therapy students in fieldwork placements, maintaining the on-site learning environment, monitoring student progress, conducting formal evaluations, conducting group student supervision and regular participation in supervisors group consultation meetings with faculty. Prerequisite: MTHR 251 with a "B" or better.

MTHR 260. Advanced Clinical Practice in Music Therapy. 1 Unit.

This course provides individualized experiences for development of advanced clinical skills in music therapy. Students may focus on a new area of specialization, or may work within a familiar clinical environment that develops skills at a more advanced level. Experiences may include supervised practice in advanced music therapy techniques, interdisciplinary collaboration, new program development, or expansion of an existing clinical program. Prerequisites: two semesters of MTHR 187 or clinical internship.

MTHR 265. Human Research in Music Therapy: Supervised Experience. 1 Unit.

This course offers individualized experiences for development of advanced research skills in music therapy. It provides faculty oversight and supervision of human research in clinical or laboratory settings. Students may focus on their own independent research project or may work within a collaborative or faculty-directed research environment. It is required for students who conduct summer research activities with human subjects and includes projects that contribute to completion of the master's thesis or clinical clerkship. This course may be repeated. Prerequisites: Completion of University Human Subjects (IRB) training for student investigators, and permission of instructor.

MTHR 275. College Teaching in Music Therapy: Curriculum, Competencies and Classroom. 3 Units.

Students review the AMTA requirements for music therapy undergraduate program curriculum and for competency-based education and clinical training. The course provides mentored practice in teaching foundational level music therapy college courses, and it supports individualized skill development for professional participation in academic music therapy programs as an instructor. Permission of instructor.

MTHR 291. Graduate Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

MTHR 299. Thesis. 1-4 Units.

Students create an original monograph that embodies original research.

General Music Courses

MUSC 202. Introduction in Music Research. 3 Units.

This course is designed for the graduate level student to develop music research skills.

MUSC 203. Contemporary Issues in Music Education and Music Therapy. 3 Units.

Graduate students research, analyze, and reflect on current values, philosophical issues, and contemporary trends in the professions of music education and music therapy.

Conservatory of Music Faculty

James W. Hipp, Interim Dean of the Conservatory of Music, 2007, BM, University of Texas, Austin, 1956; MM, University of Texas, Austin, 1963; Doctor of Music, University of Texas, Austin, 1979.

Giulio Maria Ongaro, Dean, 2009, BM, University of Iowa, 1978; MA, University of North Carolina, 1981; PhD, University of North Carolina, 1986.

Robert Coburn, Chair, Composition and Music History, Professor of Music Theory and Composition, 1993, BM, University of the Pacific, 1972; MA, University of California, Berkeley, 1974; PhD, University of Victoria (Canada), 1995.

Stephen C. Anderson, Director of the Brubeck Institute, 2007, Dean, Conservatory of Music, 2000, BA, Southwestern College, 1967; MM, Louisiana State University, 1968; DMA, University of Oklahoma, 1977.

Ruth Brittin, Program Director and Professor of Music Education, 1997, BME, Texas Tech University, 1983; MME, 1985; PhD, Florida State University, 1989.

Edward Cetto, Assistant Professor of Music, Director of Choral Activities, 1994, MM, Boston Conservatory of Music, 1992; BME, Hart School of Music (University of Hartford), 1981; Certificate, Kodaly Musical Training Institute (Hungary), 1980.

Eric Hammer, Professor, Director of Band Activities, Professor of Music Education, 1993, BM, University of the Pacific, 1973; MM, University of Oregon, 1990; DMA, University of Oregon, 1994.

Sarah Clemmens Waltz, Assistant Professor of Music History; Program Director of Music History, 2007, PhD in Music History, MPhil, Yale University, 2007; BM in Music History with Honors, Oberlin Conservatory, 2000; BA in Physics, Oberlin College, 2000.

K. Allen Brown, Assistant Professor of Percussion, 1981, BM, University of Oregon, 1969; MM, Western Michigan University, 1972; Doctoral study at the University of Illinois.

Rex Cooper, Professor of Piano, 1973, BM, Oberlin College Conservatory of Music, 1969; Juilliard School of Music, 1970, MusD, Indiana University, 1987.

Daniel Ebbers, Assistant Professor of Voice, 2004, BM, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, MM, University of Southern California.

James Haffner, Assistant Professor, 1999, BA, Baldwin Wallace College, 1993; MFA, University of Cincinnati College, 1996.

Keith N. Hatschek, Associate Professor, 2001, BA, University of California Berkeley, 1973; Certificate in Marketing, University of California Berkeley, 1993.

Feilin Hsiao, Associate Professor of Music Therapy, 2006, PhD, University of Iowa, 2006; MA, New York University, 1994; Certified Music Therapist, 1994; BA, Chinese Cultural University (Taipei, Taiwan), 1986; Board Certified Music Therapist, 2001; Teaching Credential in Music Education (1996) and Special Education (1999).

Patrick Langham, Associate Professor of Jazz Studies, 2003, BM, University of Tennessee, 1992; MM, 1994.

Burr Cochran Phillips, Assistant Professor of Voice, 2007, BM, University of North Texas, 1982; MM, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX, 1994.

Patricia Shands, Associate Professor of Clarinet, 1995, BM, Peabody Conservatory of Music, 1981; MM, University of Southern California, 1985.

Eric Waldon, Assistant Professor of Music Therapy, 2011, PhD in Educational Psychology, University of the Pacific; MA in Music Therapy, MA in Educational and Counseling Psychology, University of the Pacific; BM in Music Therapy, Western Michigan University. In addition to board certification as a music therapist, Dr. Waldon holds a credential as a school psychologist as well as a license as a psychologist in the state of California.

Nicholas Waldvogel, Associate Professor, 2001, BA, MA, Harvard University, 1989; MM, Peabody Conservatory, 1993; Graduate diploma in Conducting, Peabody Conservatory, 1994; PhD, Yale University, 1992.

Linda Wang, Assistant Professor of Violin, 2003, BM, University of Southern California, 1992; Artist Diploma, 1996; MM, 1997.

Frank H. Wiens, Professor of Piano, 1976, BM, University of Michigan, 1970; MM, 1971.

Lynelle Frankforter Wiens, Professor of Voice, 1978, BM, University of Nebraska, 1975; MM, Indiana University, 1978; MusD, Indiana University, 1988.