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Speech-Language Pathology

http://www.pacific.edu/Academics/Schools-and-Colleges/Thomas-J-Long-School-of-Pharmacy-and-Health-Sciences/Academics/Speech-Language-Pathology.html
Phone: (209) 946-2381
Location: Chan Family Health Sciences Learning Center

Robert Hanyak, Chair

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science
Master of Science (see Graduate Catalog for information)

Majors Offered

Speech-Language Pathology
Speech-Language Pathology with Departmental Honors

Minors Offered

Speech-Language Pathology

Mission

The mission of the Speech-Language Pathology department is to prepare reflective speech-language pathologists for lifelong success by providing an excellent, student-centered experiential learning environment. Our students are mentored in developing leadership, critical thinking skills, and a strong commitment to their profession and society. These efforts are assisted by the department’s commitment to professional and liberal arts programs. The faculty is dedicated to continued professional growth through clinical practice, scholarly activity, and service to the profession and the community. The graduate professional preparation program is developed in accordance with state and national accreditation standards and guidelines to ensure that graduates provide exemplary professional practice throughout their careers.

The Study of Speech-Language Pathology

Speech-Language Pathology is a professional program of habilitative and rehabilitative services. This program leads to varied occupations involved with persons with communication handicaps.

Speech-Language Pathologists work with people of all ages and are prepared to evaluate speech and language problems. They plan and implement programs to correct or modify the disorder, or develop other means of communicating. Some examples of the types of problems include articulation disorders, stuttering, voice, delayed language development and aphasia.

The Bachelor of Science in Speech-Language Pathology is a pre-professional program that leads toward a career in rehabilitative services for speech, hearing and language impaired individuals. The department has a designed major which, when combined with the graduate program, leads to the academic and in-residence clinical requirements for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology. This certificate is awarded by the American Speech-Hearing-Language Association.

Special Features

In addition to demonstrating satisfactory academic performance, students are allowed to demonstrate clinical competence. This includes:

  1. The ability to identify individuals with communication disorders.
  2. The ability to perform comprehensive evaluation of individuals with communicative disorder.
  3. The ability to effect positive changes in the communicative skills of individuals with communicative disorders.
  4. The ability to relate effectively to clients, their families and fellow professionals.
  5. The ability to conduct oneself as a prospective professional, accepting the responsibilities and exhibiting the interest which this requires.

Clinical competencies are assessed throughout the clinical experience and are considered in the recommendation to grant the BS degree.

Clinical practicum experiences are performed in the University’s Speech, Hearing and Language Center and the Stockton Scottish Rite Childhood Language Disorders Center. These local centers allow the student to directly observe and participate in the habilitative and rehabilitative processes. At the junior level, students may participate in a junior clinician role in conjunction with more advanced students. At the senior level, students are directly responsible for their own clients in the Center. All clinical experiences are under the direct observation of licensed and certified personnel.

Accreditation

The program in Speech-Language Pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Speech-Language Pathology Facilities

The department is housed in quarters designed specifically for the clinical aspects of the program. Observation mirrors and audio-monitoring systems are installed in each of the 18 therapy rooms. Facilities allow for close student-faculty interaction and clinical experiences incorporating all persons involved in the therapeutic process. The University Speech, Language and Hearing Center and the Scottish Rite Language Center strengthens the clinical aspect of the program and serves to abet the development of strong clinical skills.

Career Options

Speech-language pathologists are members of health care teams. Depending upon the nature of the problem, they may work with physicians, surgeons, orthodontists, psychologists, educators, counselors or social workers. Employment settings of the speech-language pathologist include public schools, clinics, hospitals and private practice.

Recommended High School Preparation

A strong college preparatory program serves the student very well in this major. Although not required, experience in a foreign language, good writing skills, behavioral and biological sciences and mathematics enhances the student’s skills for performance in the major.

Typical First-Year Program

No courses within the major are required during the first year. However, students interested in the major are encouraged to take SLPA 051-Introduction to Communication Disorders for an overall survey of the field during their first semester. The student is also encouraged to take a broad selection of courses in the Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences and the Physical Sciences toward fulfillment of the general education requirements.

Program Requirements

The BS degree in Speech-Language Pathology is viewed as a pre-professional degree which requires a year of clinical experience. In order to participate in Beginning and/or Intermediate Clinical Practicum (SLPA 189A/SLPA 189B) and Diagnostic Lab (SLPA 183), the student must have a 3.2 GPA in all required courses for the degree and no less than a "B-" in any Speech-Language Pathology major course.  These include the following required courses taught outside the department: Biology, Physics/Chemistry, Statistics, Child Development and Sociology or Psychology.  

In addition, students who have declared the major prior to their junior year (less than 56 units) must complete all three of the following courses before the beginning of the senior year: Biology, Physics/Chemistry, and Statistics. Transfer students who have declared the major during the junior year (more than 56 units) must complete two of the three following courses before the beginning of the senior year: Biology, Physics/Chemistry, and Statistics

If a student is ineligible to participate in SLPA 189A/SLPA 189B and SLPA 183, SLPA 110 and SLPA 181 must be taken in place of these courses.

In order to be certified, licensed and/or credentialed in the field the student must acquire the Master’s degree. Further information regarding advanced work is obtained by contacting the Speech-Language Pathology Department.

Bachelor of Science Major in Speech-Language Pathology

Students must complete a minimum of 124 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of science degree with a major in speech-language pathology.

I. General Education Requirements

Minimum 42 units and 12 courses that include:

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 24 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from below in place of taking PACS 001 and PACS 002.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)

Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may also be used to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Major Requirements

PSYC 029Developmental Psychology4
SLPA 051Introduction to Communication Disorders3
SLPA 101Clinical Methods I2
SLPA 103Clinical Methods II1
SLPA 105Clinical Methods III2
SLPA 107Clinical Methods IV1
SLPA 121Speech and Language Development3
SLPA 123Language Disorders I3
SLPA 125Speech Sound Disorders I3
SLPA 127Audiology3
SLPA 129Anatomy and Physiology of Speech3
SLPA 131Phonetics3
SLPA 133Neurogenic Case Studies in Speech-Language Pathology3
SLPA 137Speech and Hearing Science3
SLPA 139Diagnostics3
SLPA 143Multicultural Populations3
SLPA 145Disorders of Fluency3
SLPA 151Behavior Modification for SLPs3
Select one of the following:1
Diagnostic Laboratory
Diagnostic Observation
Select one of the following:1
Clinical Observations
Beginning Clinic
Select one of the following:1
Clinical Observations
Intermediate Clinic
Select one of the following:4
Elementary Statistical Inference
Introduction to Statistics and Probability
Statistical Inference in Behavioral Sciences
Select one of the following introduction to psychology/sociology courses:4
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Select one of the following biology courses:4
Human Anatomy and Physiology
Introduction to Biology
Select one of the following physical science courses:4
Elements of Chemistry
Concepts of Physics
Physics of Music
Additional requirement for Speech-Language Pathology Services credential:
SPED 123The Exceptional Child3

Bachelor of Science Major in Speech-Language Pathology with Departmental Honors

Students must complete a minimum of 124 units with a Pacific cumulative grade point average of 3.5 and major/program grade point average of 3.7 in order to earn the bachelor of science degree with a major in speech-language pathology with departmental honors.

I. General Education Requirements

Minimum 42 units and 12 courses that include:

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 24 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from below in place of taking PACS 001 and PACS 002.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)

Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may also be used to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Major Requirements

PSYC 029Developmental Psychology4
SLPA 051Introduction to Communication Disorders3
SLPA 101Clinical Methods I2
SLPA 103Clinical Methods II1
SLPA 105Clinical Methods III2
SLPA 107Clinical Methods IV1
SLPA 121Speech and Language Development3
SLPA 123Language Disorders I3
SLPA 125Speech Sound Disorders I3
SLPA 127Audiology3
SLPA 129Anatomy and Physiology of Speech3
SLPA 131Phonetics3
SLPA 133Neurogenic Case Studies in Speech-Language Pathology3
SLPA 137Speech and Hearing Science3
SLPA 139Diagnostics3
SLPA 143Multicultural Populations3
SLPA 145Disorders of Fluency3
SLPA 151Behavior Modification for SLPs3
Select one of the following:1
Diagnostic Laboratory
Diagnostic Observation
Select one of the following:1
Clinical Observations
Beginning Clinic
Select one of the following:1
Clinical Observations
Intermediate Clinic
Select one of the following:4
Elementary Statistical Inference
Introduction to Statistics and Probability
Statistical Inference in Behavioral Sciences
Select one of the following introduction to psychology/sociology courses:4
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Select one of the following biology courses:4
Human Anatomy and Physiology
Introduction to Biology
Select one of the following physical science courses:4
Elements of Chemistry
Concepts of Physics
Physics of Music
Additional requirement for Speech-Language Pathology Services credential:
SPED 123The Exceptional Child3

Speech-Language Pathology Minor

A minor in Speech-Language Pathology provides a basic understanding of normal speech, language and hearing processes, as well as an introduction to the identification of speech and language disorders.

The minor serves as an adjunct to such programs as Education, Music Therapy, Pre-Physical Therapy, Recreation Therapy, Psychology, Communication and Pre-Health Profession Preparation.

Minor in Speech-Language Pathology

Students must complete a minimum of 20 units with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in Speech-Language Pathology.

Minor Requirements
SLPA 051Introduction to Communication Disorders3
SLPA 121Speech and Language Development3
SLPA 127Audiology3
SLPA 129Anatomy and Physiology of Speech3
SLPA 131Phonetics3
Electives - select two of the following:5-6
Sign Language I
Language Disorders I
Speech Sound Disorders I
Speech and Hearing Science
Multicultural Populations
Disorders of Fluency

Note: 1) 12 of these units must be completed at the University of the Pacific. 2) Electives are chosen in consultation with a departmental advisor.

Speech Courses

SLPA 051. Introduction to Communication Disorders. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to language, voice, fluency, articulation and hearing disorders in children and adults. It is open to non-majors. (GE1A)

SLPA 053. Sign Language I. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to comprehension and expression through sign language. It is open to non-majors with permission of department. (GE2A)

SLPA 055. Sign Language II. 3 Units.

A major part of the instruction for this course is conducted in sign language. This course requires active participation by the students to further develop beginning sign language skills.

SLPA 101. Clinical Methods I. 2 Units.

Students participate in observations and analysis of therapy, materials, teaching methods, behavioral management and data collection.

SLPA 103. Clinical Methods II. 1 Unit.

Students study methods, materials, and treatment of communicative disorders. Content includes: staffings, case studies, presentations, demonstrations, and class discussion.

SLPA 105. Clinical Methods III. 2 Units.

This course assists the beginning clinician with: writing professional reports, accountability issues while exploring a variety of therapy delivery models.

SLPA 107. Clinical Methods IV. 1 Unit.

Students discuss and analyze current clinical experiences. They also explore different disorders, populations, and work environments.

SLPA 110. Clinical Observations. 1 Unit.

SLPA 110A. Clinical Observations. 1 Unit.

This course offers structured clinical observations for seniors not enrolled in SLPA 189A or SLPA 189B. Grading is Pass/No Credit only.

SLPA 110B. Clinical Observations. 1 Unit.

This course offers structured clinical observations for seniors not enrolled in SLPA 189A or SLPA 189B. Grading is Pass/No Credit only.

SLPA 121. Speech and Language Development. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide basic information relative to speech and language acquisition in normal children. Phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic development is considered, as well as pyschosocial and intellectual correlates. This course is open to non-majors.

SLPA 123. Language Disorders I. 3 Units.

This introductory course examines the speech language and behavioral characteristics associated with mental retardation, hearing impairment, emotional disturbance and neurological involvement. Discussion of appropriate diagnosis and therapeutic techniques is included.

SLPA 125. Speech Sound Disorders I. 3 Units.

An introduction to the etiology, assessment and remediation of articulation and phonologic disorders is the primary focus of the course. It is further designed to prepare students for the beginning clinical practicum experience.

SLPA 127. Audiology. 3 Units.

This introductory course in audiology emphasizes basic acoustics and psychoacoustics, anatomy and physiology of the ear, hearing measurement (pure-tone, speech and tympanometry) and types of causes of hearing impairment. This course is open to non-majors.

SLPA 129. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech. 3 Units.

Students examine the anatomy and physiology of the mechanisms of speech and hearing. This course is open to non-majors.

SLPA 131. Phonetics. 3 Units.

Students study the analysis and classification of the phonemes of standard and nonstandard dialects of American English. The course includes: intensive practice in the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, the intensive use of Visual Phonics, and the application of phonetics to communicative disorders.

SLPA 133. Neurogenic Case Studies in Speech-Language Pathology. 3 Units.

This course requires students to integrate course content from all SLPA courses taken previously in analyzing and synthesizing clinical cases related to acquired neurogenic communication disorders.

SLPA 137. Speech and Hearing Science. 3 Units.

Speech and Hearing Science provides the student with academic and laboratory training in the sciences that provide the foundation of clinical practice in communication disorders. Students gain proficiency with various types of clinical equipment through hands-on experience.

SLPA 139. Diagnostics. 3 Units.

Students study the principles, models and methods of assessment of speech and language disorders. Topics include interview, testing, and reporting procedures.

SLPA 143. Multicultural Populations. 3 Units.

Students examine theoretical models of normal second language acquisition and bilingualism that emphasize the relationship to accurate identification of communication disorders. The content distinguishes between language differences due to differing cultural linguistic variables and underlying, cross-lingual language impairment. Current research and trends in diagnosis and re-mediation techniques for multicultural clients is studied as well as. Problem-solving approaches for specific clinical cases. (DVSY, ETHC)

SLPA 145. Disorders of Fluency. 3 Units.

This introductory course in fluency disorders (stuttering) emphasizes etiology, theory, diagnosis and treatment of this speech disorder.

SLPA 151. Behavior Modification for SLPs. 3 Units.

This class focuses on basic and advanced principles of behavior modifications as they relate to the area of communication sciences and disorders. Multiple strategies to increase, decrease, or modify behaviors are introduced. Theoretical and applied experiences in planning intervention strategies, measurement techniques, generalization and maintenance of changed behaviors are emphasized.

SLPA 181. Diagnostic Observation. 1 Unit.

SLPA 181 offers structured diagnostic observations for seniors not registered in SLPA 183. Grading is Pass/No Credit only.

SLPA 183. Diagnostic Laboratory. 1 Unit.

This course is a weekly three-hour lab experience that includes demonstration and practicum in assessment of speech and language disorders.

SLPA 189A. Beginning Clinic. 1 Unit.

SLPA 189B. Intermediate Clinic. 1 Unit.

SLPA 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Major Field Competence

Demonstrate knowledge in the discipline

Critical and Creative Thinking

Demonstrate critical and creative thinking

Communication

Demonstrate effective oral and written skills

Ethical Reasoning

Understand the importance of integrating ethical behavior in their personal and professional lives

Collaboration & Leadership

Demonstrate the importance of collaborating with others within and across disciplines

Intercultural and Global Perspectives

Evidenced by satisfactory completion of the assessment and intervention project in SLPA 143 – Multicultural Populations.

Program Specific Student Learning Outcomes

1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic human communication processes.
2. Demonstrate introductory knowledge of human communication disorders and swallowing disorders.
3. Demonstrate introductory knowledge of assessment and intervention procedures for the major types of communication disorders and swallowing disorders.
4. Demonstrate a commitment to ethical and compassionate service.
5. Demonstrate knowledge of the biological sciences, physical sciences, statistics, and the social/behavioral sciences.
6. Demonstrate knowledge of basic human communication and swallowing processes, including the appropriate biological, neurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural bases.
7. Demonstrate the ability to integrate information pertaining to normal and abnormal human development across the life span.

Speech-Language Pathology Faculty

Robert E. Hanyak, Chair and Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, 1985, BA, University of the Pacific, 1979; MS, University of Utah, 1981; AuD, University of Florida, 2005

Gail Amornpongchai, Assistant Clinical Professor of Audiology, Clinical Director, 2015, BS, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, 2007; AuD, Vanderbilt University, 2011.

Larry Boles, Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, Graduate Program Director, 2010, BA, San Francisco State, 1978; MA, 1982; PhD, University of Arizona, 1995.

Nicholaus Brock, Assistant Clinical Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, Director, Stockton Scottish Rite Childhood Language Center, 2016, BS, University of the Pacific, 2011; MS, 2012.

Benjamin Reece, Assistant Clinical Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, Director of Clinical Education, 2015, BA, University of the Pacific, 2001; MS, University of the Pacific, 2008.

Jill K. Duthie, Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, 2006, BA, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1972; MA, California State University, Northridge, 1976; PhD, University of Oregon, Eugene, 2005.

Derek Isetti, Assistant Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, 2015, BA, University of California, Berkeley, 1996; MS, University of the Pacific, 2008; PhD, University of Washington, 2014.

Stephanie Raval, Assistant Clinical Professor of Audiology, 2014, BA, University of California, Santa Cruz, 2008; AuD, San Diego State University and University of California, San Diego, 2013.

Simalee Smith-Stubblefield, Professor Emeritus of Speech-Language Pathology, 1983, BS, University of Wyoming, 1976; MA, University of the Pacific, 1982.

Michael Susca, Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, 2001, BS, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1975; MS, University of New Mexico, 1977; PhD, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 2001.

Jeannene Ward-Lonergan, Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, 1999, BS, St. Joseph's College, 1984; MS, Boston University, 1989; PhD, University of Connecticut, 1995.