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School of International Studies

http://www.pacific.edu/sis
Phone: (209) 946-2650
Location: George Wilson Hall

Bill Herrin, Director
email: DirectorSIS@pacific.edu 

Mary-Lou Tyler, Academic Adviser
e-mail: mtyler@pacific.edu

Undergraduate Degree Programs Offered

International Relations (BA)
Global Studies (BA)
Development and Cultural Change (BA)
International Affairs and Commerce (BA)
Applied International Economics (BA/MS) accelerated program (see Cooperative Programs Offered below)

Minors Offered

International Studies
    Diverse Academic Track
    Foreign Language Track
    Study Abroad Track
Anthropology

Cooperative Programs Offered

5-year BA/MS in Applied International Economics (traditional 4-year BA at Pacific followed by 1-year MS at Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin)

A professional school devoted to the interdisciplinary study of international affairs, offering students four undergraduate majors including one or two semesters of study abroad, and graduate studies in a master’s of intercultural relations.

Mission

The School of International Studies is Pacific’s window to the world. Through international, interdisciplinary and intercultural immersion, we prepare students to succeed in a variety of global professions in industry, government, not-for-profit organizations and educational institutions.

The School of International Studies (SIS) grew out of the innovative programs in two of University of the Pacific’s three former “cluster colleges” (Callison and Elbert Covell) and the international majors offered in College of the Pacific. Established in 1987, SIS offers a unique and challenging environment that immerses students in an interdisciplinary approach to international affairs, and provides a community of students and faculty who share a deep intellectual curiosity for global issues.

The undergraduate program combines the study of political science, economics, history, anthropology and geography. Students develop strong research, critical thinking and analytical skills. Study abroad and competency in at least one second language are central to the curriculum. Students benefit from the school’s internationally recognized cross-cultural training program before and after their study abroad experience. They can take advantage of any number of experiential learning opportunities through local and global internships, and many choose to design their own experiential program. The careers SIS graduates pursue range widely, and include positions in non-governmental organizations, business, the government, and academe.

Bachelor of Arts Major in International Relations

The International Relations major is designed for students with a particular interest in comparative and international politics. In addition to the CORE Requirements, students take additional coursework in Economics and substantial upper division work in Political Science. While all majors provide an excellent foundation for a range of careers, as evidenced by SIS alumni, this major prepares students for careers in government and law in particular, as well as for graduate school.

Students must complete a minimum of 128 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree in international relations.

I. General Education Requirements

Students who enter college for the first time are required to take PACS 001, PACS 002 and PACS 003 in addition to six courses from the breadth program. These breadth courses must come from categories IA, IB, IIA, IIC, IIIA and IIIB. Courses taken for the major can also fulfill these general education requirements.

Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units are not required to take PACS 001 and PACS 002. They are required to take PACS 003 and complete general education courses in the following categories: IA, IB, IIA, IIC, IIIA, IIIB and either a IC or IIB course and either an additional IIIA or IIIC course. Courses taken for the major can also fulfill these general education requirements.

Pacific Seminars

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

 
Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course (Transfer Students only)

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program. 2) * Courses satisfy both GE and major requirements, except as noted.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated diversity course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may also be used to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must Demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Core Requirements

ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics4
INTL 010Director's Seminar1
INTL 077Contemporary World Issues4
INTL 081Perspectives on World History4
INTL 101Social Science Research Methods4
Select one of the following:4
World Geography for the Social Sciences
Pacific Rim Geography
INTL 151Cross-Cultural Training I2
INTL 161Cross-Cultural Training II2
INTL 185SIS Capstone2
Select one of the following:4
Cultural Anthropology
Antropología Cultural
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Principles of Comparative Politics *
Competence in a Modern Foreign Language at the level of 4th semester college course or equivalent (typically demonstrated through LANG 025)
SABD 000Overseas Study12-18
*

 Cannot double count this course as a requirement in the International Relations major

Note: 1) The semester abroad must be in a program approved by the advisor as appropriate to the major. 2) Students from abroad and Global Nomad students may be exempt from SABD 000. 3) Seniors with a 3.0 GPA or above may choose to complete a four unit senior thesis/independent research project (INTL 197) under the supervision of a cooperating professor. Students who complete a Senior Thesis with a B+ or better grade earn an SIS Honors Research designation.

V. Major Requirements

POLS 051Introduction to International Relations4
ECON 055Introductory Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy4
ECON 071Global Economic Issues4
Select one of the following4
Econometrics
Introduction to Statistics and Probability
Calculus I
Select four of the following:16
Global Environmental Policy
Western European Comparative Politics
Latin American Politics
Politics of the Middle East
Political Development
Principles of Comparative Politics *
Politics of Asia
Theories of International Politics
International Organization
International Political Economy
International Conflict and Conflict Management
Comparative Foreign Policy
U.S. Foreign Policy
Inter-American Relations
*

 Cannot double count this course as a requirement in the International Relations major

Bachelor of Arts Major in Global Studies

The Global Studies major is designed for students who seek a more general global education. In addition to the CORE Requirements, students are required to take a course on globalization and spend a second semester abroad. Their further upper division international studies coursework may be in any discipline offering relevant courses; the program of study is decided upon by the student in consultation with his or her advisor. 

Students must complete a minimum of 128 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree in global studies.

I. General Education Requirements

Students who enter college for the first time are required to take PACS 001, PACS 002 and PACS 003 in addition to six courses from the breadth program. These breadth courses must come from categories IA, IB, IIA, IIC, IIIA and IIIB. Courses taken for the major can also fulfill these general education requirements.

Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units are not required to take PACS 001 and PACS 002. They are required to take PACS 003 and complete general education courses in the following categories: IA, IB, IIA, IIC, IIIA, IIIB and either a IC or IIB course and either an additional IIIA or IIIC course. Courses taken for the major can also fulfill these general education requirements.

Pacific Seminars

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course (Transfer Students only)

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program. 2) * Courses satisfy both GE and major requirements, except as noted.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated diversity course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may also be used to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Core Requirements

ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics4
INTL 010Director's Seminar1
INTL 077Contemporary World Issues4
INTL 081Perspectives on World History4
INTL 101Social Science Research Methods4
Select one of the following:4
World Geography for the Social Sciences
Pacific Rim Geography
INTL 151Cross-Cultural Training I2
INTL 161Cross-Cultural Training II2
INTL 185SIS Capstone2
Select one of the following:4
Cultural Anthropology
Antropología Cultural
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Principles of Comparative Politics
Competence in a Modern Foreign Language at the level of 4th semester college course or equivalent (typically demonstrated through LANG 025)
SABD 000Overseas Study (1st Semester)12-18

Note: 1) The semesters abroad must be in a program approved by the advisor as appropriate to the major. 2) Students from abroad and Global Nomad students may be exempt from SABD 000. 3) Seniors with a 3.0 GPA or above may choose to complete a four unit senior thesis/independent research project (ANTH 197/ INTL 197) under the supervision of a cooperating professor. Students who complete a Senior Thesis with a B+ or better grade earn an SIS Honors Research designation.

V. Major Requirements

INTL 105Globalization, the U.S. and the World4
SABD 000Overseas Study (2nd Semester)12-18
Select four 100 level international affairs courses from the following: *12-16
Modern Middle East
Anthropology of Africa
Language and Culture
Anthropology of Food
Culture and Economy
Culture and Power
Asian Cinemas
Society, Gender and Culture in East Asia
East Asian Literature
Globalization History: Economic, Environmental, and Demographic Interactions
International Trade
International Finance
Economic Development
Littérature Française B
Le Cinema Francais/French Cinema in English
La Francophonie
Individu et Societe
Europe in Turmoil 1900-1945
History of the Holocaust
Europe Since 1945
Modern Germany
Borderlands
Southeast Asia and the West
Modern Chinese History
Japan in War and Peace
People's History of Mexico
Modern Japanese Fiction
Western European Comparative Politics
Latin American Politics
Principles of Comparative Politics
Politics of Asia
Theories of International Politics
International Organization
International Political Economy
International Conflict and Conflict Management
Comparative Foreign Policy
U.S. Foreign Policy
Contemporary Russian Film
Cine hispano/Hispanic Film
Literatura mexicana
Poesía hispánica
Teatro hispánico
Literatura del boom latinoamericano
*

When selecting the four 100 level international affairs courses, it is to be approved by the advisor.  Additional upper division courses may be approved on a case by case basis.

Bachelor of Arts Major in Development and Cultural Change

The Development and Cultural Change major is designed for students with a particular interest in international development issues. In addition to the CORE Requirements, students take some additional coursework in Economics, as well as courses focusing on questions of development from a range of disciplinary perspectives. This major focuses on preparing students for careers and graduate work in development and international aid.

Students must complete a minimum of 128 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree in development and cultural change.

I. General Education Requirements

Students who enter college for the first time are required to take PACS 001, PACS 002 and PACS 003 in addition to six courses from the breadth program. These breadth courses must come from categories IA, IB, IIA, IIC, IIIA and IIIB. Courses taken for the major can also fulfill these general education requirements.

Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units are not required to take PACS 001 and PACS 002. They are required to take PACS 003 and complete general education courses in the following categories: IA, IB, IIA, IIC, IIIA, IIIB and either a IC or IIB course and either an additional IIIA or IIIC course. Courses taken for the major can also fulfill these general education requirements.

Pacific Seminars

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course (Transfer Students only)

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program. 2) * Courses satisfy both GE and major requirements, except as noted.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated diversity course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may also be used to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must Demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Core Requirements

ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics4
INTL 010Director's Seminar1
INTL 077Contemporary World Issues4
INTL 081Perspectives on World History4
INTL 101Social Science Research Methods4
Select one of the following:4
World Geography for the Social Sciences
Pacific Rim Geography
INTL 151Cross-Cultural Training I2
INTL 161Cross-Cultural Training II2
INTL 185SIS Capstone2
Select one of the following:4
Cultural Anthropology
Antropología Cultural
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Principles of Comparative Politics *
Competence in a Modern Foreign Language at the level of 4th semester college course or equivalent (typically demonstrated through LANG 025)
SABD 000Overseas Study12-18

Note: 1) The semester abroad must be in a program approved by the advisor as appropriate to the major. 2) Students from abroad and Global Nomad students may be exempt from SABD 000. 3) Seniors with a 3.0 GPA or above may choose to complete a four unit senior thesis/independent research project (ANTH 197/ INTL 197) under the supervision of a cooperating professor. Students who complete a Senior Thesis with a B+ or better grade earn an SIS Honors Research designation.

V. Major Requirements

INTL 105Globalization, the U.S. and the World4
ECON 055Introductory Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy4
ECON 071Global Economic Issues4
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to Statistics and Probability
Calculus I
Select three of the following:12
Economic Development
Political Development
Development, Modernization, and Cultural Change
Anthropology of Africa *
Anthropology of Food *
Culture and Economy *
Culture and Power *
Independent Research (in development (to be approved by the advisor))
*

 A maximum of one Anthropology course may count toward this requirement.

Note: A student in this major is strongly encouraged to complete a study abroad program in a developing country.

Bachelor of Arts Major in International Affairs and Commerce

The International Affairs and Commerce major is designed for students with a particular interest in economics, or an intention of working in international business. In addition to the CORE Requirements, students take further coursework in economics, as well as a two-course business sequence. The major prepares students for careers in business and economics, as well as for graduate school.

Students must complete a minimum of 128 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree in international affairs and commerce.

I. General Education Requirements

Students who enter college for the first time are required to take PACS 001, PACS 002 and PACS 003 in addition to six courses from the breadth program. These breadth courses must come from categories IA, IB, IIA, IIC, IIIA and IIIB. Courses taken for the major can also fulfill these general education requirements.

Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units are not required to take PACS 001 and PACS 002. They are required to take PACS 003 and complete general education courses in the following categories: IA, IB, IIA, IIC, IIIA, IIIB and either a IC or IIB course and either an additional IIIA or IIIC course. Courses taken for the major can also fulfill these general education requirements.

Pacific Seminars

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course (Transfer Students only)

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program. 2) * Courses satisfy both GE and major requirements, except as noted.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated diversity course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may also be used to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must Demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Core Requirements

ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics4
INTL 010Director's Seminar1
INTL 077Contemporary World Issues4
INTL 081Perspectives on World History4
INTL 101Social Science Research Methods4
Select one of the following:4
World Geography for the Social Sciences
Pacific Rim Geography
INTL 151Cross-Cultural Training I2
INTL 161Cross-Cultural Training II2
INTL 185SIS Capstone2
Select one of the following:4
Cultural Anthropology
Antropología Cultural
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Principles of Comparative Politics
Competence in a Modern Foreign Language at the level of 4th semester college course or equivalent (typically demonstrated through LANG 025)
SABD 000Overseas Study12-18

Note: 1) The semester abroad must be in a program approved by the advisor as appropriate to the major. 2) Students from abroad and Global Nomad students may be exempt from SABD 000. 3) Seniors with a 3.0 GPA or above may choose to complete a four unit senior thesis/independent research project (ANTH 197/ INTL 197) under the supervision of a cooperating professor. Students who complete a Senior Thesis with a B+ or better grade earn an SIS Honors Research designation.

V. Major Requirements

ECON 055Introductory Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy4
ECON 121International Trade4
ECON 123International Finance4
BUSI 031Principles of Financial Accounting4
Select one of the following:4
Econometrics
Introduction to Statistics and Probability
Calculus I
Select one of the following two-course sequences:8
A)
The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business
International Trade Law
B)
The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business
International Commercial Law
C)
Financial Management
International Financial Management
D)
Marketing Management
International Marketing
E)
Management and Organizational Behavior
International Management

Accelerated Master of Science in Applied International Economics at Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The School of International Studies, in collaboration with the Economics Department at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, offers students the opportunity to pursue a Master of Science degree in Applied Economics (MSAE) at Marquette with six possible specializations including International Economics. This accelerated degree is designed to be completed within 5 years of entering Pacific, which is 1 year sooner than the usual time required to complete undergraduate and masters degrees.

Interested students would earn their BA degree at Pacific's School of International Studies while following the typical 4-year plan. During this time, in consultation with academic advisers, they would also successfully complete

  • At least one calculus course,
  • ECON 055,
  • ECON 101,
  • ECON 103,
  • ECON 190, and
  • Two upper-division economics courses (with a grade of "B" or better) specifically tailored to satisfy 2 of the 10 courses required to complete the MSAE.

Students must inform their academic advisers of their interest in the program by the time they achieve junior standing or they may not be able to complete both degrees in 5 years.

Students would apply to the MSAE program at Marquette during the first semester of their final year at Pacific. Marquette requires all applicants to take either the GRE or GMAT exam and to have an overall GPA of 3.0 or better. Admission to the MSAE program is at the sole discretion of Marquette and is not guaranteed.

Anthropology Minor

The Anthropology Minor is designed to allow students with an interest in Anthropology the opportunity to combine a generalized sequence of courses into a program. An Anthropology Minor broadens a student’s major field of study by exposing the student to the diverse ways of life of people around the globe. Students who complete the Anthropology Minor have a greater knowledge of the theories, concepts, and methods used by Anthropologists in the study of human cultures, past and present. A Minor in Anthropology is excellent preparation for further study in any field that requires the abilities to understand and engage with people from other cultures (including teaching, medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, business, law, and counseling).

Students must complete a minimum of 20 units and five courses with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in anthropology,

Note: 1) At least 10 units of the minor must come from courses taken at Pacific or through an approved study abroad program 2) At least three courses taken in the School of International Studies must be taken at Pacific as specified below.

Select one of the following:4
Cultural Anthropology
Antropología Cultural
Select one of the following:4
Physical Anthropology
Approved ANTH Course
Select two of the following advanced anthropology electives:8
Modern Middle East
Anthropology of Africa
Language and Culture
Anthropology of Food
Culture and Economy
Culture and Power
Anthropology Theory
Approved ANTH Course
Select one of the following groups:4-14
A)
Anthropology (ANTH) 4 unit Elective
B)
Overseas Study
Cross-Cultural Training I
Cross-Cultural Training II

 

International Studies Minor

The minor in International Studies helps students from other disciplines prepare for globalization in the 21st century by systematically deepening their understanding of the world outside of the U.S. All minors in international studies start with an introductory course on the world of the 20th century, followed by one of three different international tracks. Students who pursue a major in the School of International Studies are not eligible for an SIS minor. A student interested in the International Studies minor consults with the SIS Director of Student Affairs early in his or her academic planning.

Students must complete the required courses with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in international studies.

Note: 1) At least 10 units of the minor must come from courses taken at Pacific or through an approved study abroad program.

Diverse Academic Track

(Minimum 20 units)

INTL 077Contemporary World Issues4
INTL 081Perspectives on World History4
Select 12 units from the following Electives:12
100 level courses selected from SIS Core
Modern Language & Literature courses (8 units maximum) and/or
International Electives from two different disciplines

 

Foreign Language Track

(Minimum 20 units)

INTL 077Contemporary World Issues4
LANG 025Intermediate Language, 4th Sem4
LANG Elective (One upper division Modern Language and Literature course taught in a foreign language. The course may be taken at the University of the Pacific or on an approved study abroad program.)4
Select 12 units from the following Electives:12
100 level courses selected from SIS Core and/or
Additional International Electives from two different disciplines

 

Note: 1) This language may not be the same one used to complete a major in the Department of Modern Language and Literature.

Study Abroad Track

(Minimum 20 units)

INTL 077Contemporary World Issues4
INTL 151Cross-Cultural Training I2
INTL 161Cross-Cultural Training II2
SABD 000 Overseas Study
Select 12 units from the following Electives:12
100 level courses selected from SIS Core and/or
International Electives from two different disciplines

 

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 053. Cultural Anthropology. 4 Units.

This introductory course covers the anthropological view of humanity, the character and nature of culture, and the diversity of the human species. The major concepts, methods, and theoretical assumptions of the discipline are illustrated by applying anthropological perspectives to peoples from around the world. Topics include culture, ethnicity, and language; kinship, marriage, and social organization; time and space; religion, magic and rituals; gender and sexuality; power, inequality, and political relations; economic production, circulation, and consumption; social control; and the various forces and forms of change. General Education IC. (DVSY, ETHC, GE1C)

ANTH 054. Antropología Cultural. 4 Units.

Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 053) is taught in Spanish. See course description above. (DVSY, ETHC, GE1C)

ANTH 093. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

Occasional offerings on topics in anthropology of current interest to faculty and students. Normally will have no prerequisite.

ANTH 112. Physical Anthropology. 4 Units.

Students examine human origins and an evaluation of humanity’s place in the natural world. This course examines processes and principles of human evolution from an anthropological perspective which emphasize the interaction between biology and culture. Major topics include reproduction and genetics, human variation, primate studies, and the fossil record. After reviewing the basic tenets of the “anthropological perspective” and evolutionary science, the course examines micro and macro level processes of evolution, that focus on the origins and dispersal of our own species, Homo sapiens. Finally, the course evaluates the current state of human biocultural evolution, the significance of human diversity, and the role of humans in ongoing planetary processes of change and interaction. General Education IIIC. (ETHC, GE3C)

ANTH 132. Modern Middle East. 4 Units.

How do Palestinians and Israelis conceptualize the ideal polity? How do Muslims understand the roles of women and men? How are historical experiences related to the collective memory of a community, and how does memory shape contemporary social life in the Middle East? How are local histories, societies, and cultures related to global processes of politics, economics, and culture? How do modern Middle Eastern peoples see their own identities and how and why do these conceptions differ from Western discourses about the region? This course is an introduction to thinking critically about these and related questions. Readings are drawn from various areas, that include history, anthropology, and literature. Middle Eastern experiences are also surveyed through other media, such as film. Students are encouraged to think critically about and beyond both popular Western images of the Middle East and supposed boundaries between nations and civilizations. Particular emphasis is given to the interconnections – political, cultural, etc. – between East and West, South and North. Sophomore standing.

ANTH 134. Anthropology of Africa. 4 Units.

Africa is a large and diverse continent that is characterized by a multiplicity of cultures, histories, identities and experiences. This course is designed to encourage an appreciation of the complexity of contemporary Africa and to consider how African realities may differ from common stereotypes of the continent. This is primarily a course on contemporary Africa but it also includes a historical overview of key events that continue to shape current realities such as trade and migration, colonialism, and nationalist struggles for independence. While contemporary issues such as poverty and political violence are addressed, the focus is on the richness and diversity of African lives and experiences from rural to urban settings across the continent. Course material addresses the interconnections between politics, kinship, gender, ethnicity, economics and history. Sophomore standing is required.

ANTH 153. Language and Culture. 4 Units.

In this seminar, the interconnections between language and culture are explored from an anthropological perspective that include approaches to the study of language within anthropology, methods of linguistic anthropological research, linguistic relativity, conversational styles, and links between language and power. (DVSY)

ANTH 164. Anthropology of Food. 4 Units.

The anthropological study of food examines human foodways within a bio-cultural and cross-cultural context. Anthropologists study humans and human culture across space and evolutionary time; this includes the examination of cultural patterns and social institutions. Food requires hunting, gathering, growing, storage, distribution, preparation, display, serving, and disposal, all of which are social and cultural activities. This course explores the important role of food production, preparation, and eating in different cultures, as well as the symbolism and economic importance of food. Students focus on the current transformations of the world food system, through processes of globalization, the growth of new technologies, human migration and fast food. The counter-movement for localization and ‘slow food’ are also explored. Students can expect to take part in some cooking and eating as well. Prerequisite: ANTH 053 or ANTH 054.

ANTH 170. Culture and Economy. 4 Units.

This course provides an anthropological approach to the study of economic behavior in a cross-cultural context. Are there places in the world where people don’t care about the latest cell phones or clothing fashions? Do people always seek to buy the most goods that they can with their money? Do different cultures define rational, maximizing behavior differently? In this class students explore the variety of different ways in which people produce, exchange and consume goods and how these processes are embedded in social and cultural institutions. Throughout the semester, students read ethnographic articles and case studies that discuss other peoples’ economic lives and touch on important issues of global poverty and development. Topics include markets, gifts, commodities, property rights, systems of production and exchange, and change within local and global economies. Prerequisite: ANTH 053 or ANTH 054.

ANTH 172. Culture and Power. 4 Units.

What is power? How are power relations configured differently across cultures? How is power institutionalized and contested in an increasingly interconnected world? The theme that unites all these concerns is the politics of everyday life: how power works in and through culture to shape the lives of individuals and societies. Topics of discussion include: conflict and conflict resolution,; law and custom, leadership and authority, social and cultural control, ritual and symbolism, gender, ethnicity, and identity politics, nationalism and colonialism, representation, agency and political subjectivity, civil society organizations and social movements, borders, boundaries and citizenship. (DVSY)

ANTH 187. Internship. 1-4 Units.

An internship, approved and supervised by a faculty adviser, is an opportunity for a student to intellectually reflect on a supervised work experience in a setting appropriate for the student's career and life goals. Prerequisites: two advanced anthropology courses with a minimum 2.5 GPA.

ANTH 188. Anthropology Theory. 4 Units.

This course provides a critical review of the history of anthropological theory, that include its epistemology, paradigms, major concepts, central questions, and methodologies, as well as the relationships of these to each other and to their historical context. In tracing the discipline’s history from its precursors to its establishment as an academic discipline and then through the last century to the present, the course introduces students to major theoretical approaches in anthropology and interrogates the interconnections between anthropological theory, knowledge, ethics, and practice. Prerequisites: ANTH 053 or ANTH 054. Junior standing.

ANTH 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Permission of instructor. Junior standing.

ANTH 193. Special Topics, Upper Division. 1-4 Units.

Occasional offerings on topics in anthropology of current interest to faculty and students. Prerequisite: ANTH 053.

ANTH 197. Independent Research. 1-4 Units.

Advanced students are offered the opportunity to design and complete an independent research project under the direction of a faculty member beyond the requirements of other course work. Prerequisites: two advanced anthropology courses with a 3.0 Pacific GPA. Permission of Instructor.

International Studies Courses

INTL 010. Director's Seminar. 1 Unit.

A general introduction to making a successful transition to college. Emphasis is placed on developing research and presentation skills, collaborative learning, critical thinking, and self-assessment. Students also develop a 4-year academic plan while learning about University resources and opportunities that complement and supplement their academic work. Required for all SIS first year students.

INTL 061. The UN System. 2 Units.

An in-depth examination of the formation, development and organization of the United Nations with special emphasis on its missions, priorities and activities on the international stage.

INTL 067. Introduction to Model United Nations (MUN I). 1-2 Units.

This course is an overview of the workings of the United Nations with particular attention paid to current world issues before that body. Emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking and oral advocacy skills in preparation for attending a competitive Model United Nations conference. Course may be taken for up to 2 units.

INTL 069. Introduction to International Law. 4 Units.

This course offers an in-depth examination of the intersection between international relations, economic globalization and national security – an intersection that has given rise to international law. In particular, the course addresses the growing cadre of actors (international as well as regional, inter-governmental and non-governmental) in this field.

INTL 071. Cross Cultural for International Students. 1 Unit.

Cross Cultural for International Students engages the theory and practice of living and studying in cultures other than your home culture. It delivers culture general frameworks for understanding cultural similarities and differences, and focuses specifically on the skills and knowledge necessary to integrate successfully into the United States and the American university context.

INTL 077. Contemporary World Issues. 4 Units.

Students are introduced to the most important current global issues through a look at their contemporaneous history over the last century. Students also examine the political, economic, and cultural changes around the world that have led to today’s problems and opportunities.

INTL 077L. Twentieth Century Through Documentaries. 1 Unit.

Complementing INTL 077 (Contemporary World Issues), this video course offers historical footage of significant persons, events, and movements around the world throughout the 20th century. The discussion of the videos seeks to deepen understanding of the atmosphere and attitudes surrounding significant events of the 20th century. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: INTL 077 or permission of instructor.

INTL 081. Perspectives on World History. 4 Units.

Students study of the shape of human history from its beginnings to the present day. The course is built around the work of several modern historians whose interpretations differ, but whose insights help us to understand humanity’s attempt to cope with life on Earth. General education IIB. (GE2B)

INTL 093. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

INTL 105. Globalization, the U.S. and the World. 4 Units.

This interdisciplinary course surveys the changing nature of global relations that focus on political, economic, and cultural aspects of globalization and the US role in global affairs. Students study US governance (which includes the institutions of government) in comparative perspective in order to better understand the country’s position in the world. The course also addresses the meaning and implications of globalization: what impact does it have on democracy in the world, the global environment, etc. Prerequisites: INTL 077 and ECON 053.

INTL 113. World Geography for the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

This interdisciplinary course is an overview of the study of human geography and is designed to promote both geographic literacy and critical geographical thinking. Issues and themes covered include cultural geography; political geography; space- and place-making; landscape, ecology, and resource consumption; cartography and its critics; and national, imperial, and gendered geographies and their critics. Case studies draw from many world regions and cultures. Sophomore standing.

INTL 113L. Video Lab for World Geography. 2 Units.

Complementing INTL 113 (World Geography), this course offers documentary videos which bring to life geographical concepts. Each video focuses on a different society that show insights into the way that geography influences the economy, politics, and culture of a society. The discussion of each video gives a deeper appreciation of human geography – the similarities and differences among people and societies around the world. The discussion also shows the importance of geography in understanding the current international news. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: INTL 113 or permission of instructor.

INTL 115. Pacific Rim Geography. 4 Units.

This course covers the geography of the Americas, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. The physical geography of each region is explored followed by an examination of the economic, political, social/cultural, and environmental patterns and issues in each of these regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on the countries with the largest populations in the regions that surround the Pacific Rim which includes China, the US, Indonesia, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico. Prerequisites: ECON 051 or ECON 053 or ECON 055. Sophomore standing.

INTL 123. Literature Across Cultures. 4 Units.

On the basis of selected works taken from the vast body of contemporary world literature, the course surveys the variety of literary expression from cultures around the globe. Although often separated physically by continents, creative writers respond to fundamental human dilemmas in ways characteristic of their craft as well as individuals and members of a culture. Students read, compare, and discuss these responses as they have been formed in Lagos, Berlin or Sao Paulo, Tokyo, Paris or Mobile. Emphasis is on conflicts that arise from post colonialism. General Education IC.

INTL 151. Cross-Cultural Training I. 2 Units.

This course prepares students for interacting in cultures other than their own. It is designed to assist students in developing learning and coping strategies when outside their native cultural environment, such as while studying abroad, as well as the communication and intercultural skills needed for interacting successfully in new cultural environments. Topics include cultural values and assumptions, intercultural communication, and cross cultural problems and adjustment. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills. (DVSY)

INTL 152. Inter-American Cross-Cultural Training. 2 Units.

Inter-American Cross Cultural Training deals with the theory and practice of living and working in US Latino and Latin American cultures. It is intended to prepare students to operate successfully in a professional context either abroad in a Spanish-speaking country or in Hispanic communities within the United States. Through course work leads up to an internship that requires experiential learning. Students will increase their understanding of the general character of the cross-cultural experience, explore learning and coping strategies to maximize that experience, amplify their understanding of themselves as cultural beings so that they can better understand others, and gain basic cultural knowledge necessary for them to operate successfully in bilingual (English/Spanish) professional settings. It is designed to build both culture-general skills as well as culture-specific ones. That is, students learn skills that serve them in intercultural encounters with people from all over the world, but emerge with particular preparation to productively engage across difference in Latin America and with US Latinos. Permission of instructor.

INTL 161. Cross-Cultural Training II. 2 Units.

This course analyzes and evaluates the effects and consequences of cross-cultural exposure. Topics include entry and return culture shock, communication styles and channels, alterations in value structure, and models that characterize personal and cultural change. Prerequisites: INTL 151 and study abroad (SABD). (DVSY)

INTL 165. Development, Modernization, and Cultural Change. 4 Units.

The purpose of this course is to examine what we know about defining and measuring sustainable human development in the areas of: economic development, political development (governance, democracy and civil society), human development (health, population, nutrition and gender issues), health, education, environmentally-sustainable development, and the areas of disasters and failed states. This course is interdisciplinary and problem-oriented. It uses databases that are made available, and students undertake country and context specific analyses and case studies. The successful completion of this course equips students with an interdisciplinary and holistic understanding of sustainable human development. Finally the emphasis placed on comparative analysis to help the student gain a deeper understanding of a country in a broader regional and international context. Prerequisites: POLS 011 or POLS 051; ANTH 053; ECON 053 or permission of instructor.

INTL 167. Advanced Model United Nations (MUN II). 1-2 Units.

This course offers advanced instruction on the workings of the specialized agencies of the United Nations and other international organizations with particular attention paid to current world issues before those bodies. Emphasis is placed on independent research and writing, as well as leadership skills, in preparation for attending a competitive Model United Nations conference. Prerequisite: POLS 051. May be taken for up to 2 units. (PLAW)

INTL 174. Global Environmental Policy. 4 Units.

Students examine the major environmental problems that confront the world today and an analysis of specific policies formulated to address those problems. Among the issues to be studied are deforestation, atmospheric and marine pollution, climate change, ozone depletion, and species loss. Prerequisite: POLS 051. (ENST)

INTL 175. SIS Mentor III: Ethics Across Cultures. 4 Units.

This interdisciplinary course helps students become aware of how they think about ethics. It puts students’ experiences in more than one culture into an ethical framework, and prepares students for ethical action in their professional lives. The students look at philosophical and religious bases for ethical decision making in different cultures, and they use case studies to show applications of different ways of approaching ethical dilemmas. As a capstone course for international studies students, it explores ethical issues associated with human rights, development, the environment, sovereignty, war, refugees, and international business practices. Students prepare an ethical biography of a significant person who has spent considerable time in two different cultures. Students also prepare their own ethical autobiographies. Prerequisites: INTL 151 and a semester of study abroad, or a bi-cultural background (and with permission of instructor).

INTL 185. SIS Capstone. 2 Units.

This capstone course integrates the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary SIS core curriculum with the experiential learning of study abroad. This is accomplished through analysis of the role of the individual in a variety of cultural and historical contexts that pay particular attention to questions of identity and ethics in a complex global environment. Prerequisites: a semester of study abroad or permission of instructor. Senior standing.

INTL 187. Internship. 1-4 Units.

An internship, approved and supervised by a faculty adviser, is an opportunity for a student to intellectually reflect on a supervised work experience in a setting appropriate for the student's career and life goals. Prerequisites: two SIS core courses and a minimum 2.5 GPA.

INTL 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Ordinarily limited to SIS juniors and seniors. Student must be in good academic standing. Permission of instructor.

INTL 193. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

INTL 193W. Special Topics-Business. 1-4 Units.

INTL 193X. Special Topics-Business. 1-4 Units.

INTL 193Y. Special Topics-Business. 1-4 Units.

INTL 193Z. Special Topics-Business. 1-4 Units.

INTL 197. Independent Research. 1-4 Units.

Advanced students are offered the opportunity to design and complete an independent research project under the direction of a faculty member beyond the requirements of other course work. A minimum 3.0 GPA is required. Permission of instructor.

SIS National Courses

ANTH 132. Modern Middle East. 4 Units.

How do Palestinians and Israelis conceptualize the ideal polity? How do Muslims understand the roles of women and men? How are historical experiences related to the collective memory of a community, and how does memory shape contemporary social life in the Middle East? How are local histories, societies, and cultures related to global processes of politics, economics, and culture? How do modern Middle Eastern peoples see their own identities and how and why do these conceptions differ from Western discourses about the region? This course is an introduction to thinking critically about these and related questions. Readings are drawn from various areas, that include history, anthropology, and literature. Middle Eastern experiences are also surveyed through other media, such as film. Students are encouraged to think critically about and beyond both popular Western images of the Middle East and supposed boundaries between nations and civilizations. Particular emphasis is given to the interconnections – political, cultural, etc. – between East and West, South and North. Sophomore standing.

ANTH 134. Anthropology of Africa. 4 Units.

Africa is a large and diverse continent that is characterized by a multiplicity of cultures, histories, identities and experiences. This course is designed to encourage an appreciation of the complexity of contemporary Africa and to consider how African realities may differ from common stereotypes of the continent. This is primarily a course on contemporary Africa but it also includes a historical overview of key events that continue to shape current realities such as trade and migration, colonialism, and nationalist struggles for independence. While contemporary issues such as poverty and political violence are addressed, the focus is on the richness and diversity of African lives and experiences from rural to urban settings across the continent. Course material addresses the interconnections between politics, kinship, gender, ethnicity, economics and history. Sophomore standing is required.

ARTH 120. Chinese Art History. 4 Units.

This course is an introductory survey of the visual arts of China, from the Stone Age to the present. Students analyze works of art stylistically and their meanings are examined within original political and social contexts. China's enduring artistic tradition is emphasized. (GE2C)

ARTH 122. Japanese Art History. 4 Units.

This introductory course surveys the visual arts of Japan from prehistoric to the present. Students analyze works of art for their style, meanings, and original political and social contexts. How artists worked within Japanese artistic tradition and how they absorbed influences from abroad is emphasized. (GE2C)

ENGL 043. British Literature after 1800. 4 Units.

This course begins with Blake and ends with Pinter, and includes such authors as Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, Tennyson, Browning and Hardy, Yeats, Thomas, Joyce, Eliot, Lawrence, and Lessing. The approach is historical, with a focus on the distinctive qualities of the Romantic, Victorian, Modern and Contemporary traditions. This course connects with ENGL 041, but that course is not a prerequisite. (GE2A)

FREN 051. French Literature in English. 4 Units.

A study of selected themes, periods, and genres in French and Francophone literature is examined. For specific topics, see FREN 124, FREN 122, and FREN 128. All readings, discussions, lectures, and exams are in English. This course is applicable to French Studies Majors. (GE2A)

FREN 114. Civilisation Française B. 4 Units.

Topics in the culture and civilization of France from the 18th century to the present are covered and studies include philosophers and revolutionaries, development of literary culture, avant-gardes, multi-cultural France, and the French nation within Europe. Prerequisite: FREN 025 with a "C-" or better or permission of instructor.

FREN 118. Littérature Française B. 4 Units.

An introductory study of French literature from the 19th century to the present. Includes works by Balzac, Sand, Flaubert, Zola, Proust, Colette, Gide, Modiano, Duras and others. Prerequisite: FREN 025 with a "C-" or better or permission of instructor.

FREN 120. Le Cinema Francais/French Cinema in English. 4 Units.

Students study the development of French cinema from its inception to the present through the analysis of themes, culture, styles, and cinematography. Directors who are studied include Lumiere, Melies, Vigo, Gance, Renoir, Carne, Godard, Truffaut, Resnais, Chabrol, Tavenier, Varda, Cantet, Kassovitz and others. The course is in French. Occassionally offered in English with no prerequisite. (Course is applicable to the French Studies Track in French or English version.) Prerequisite: FREN 025 with a "C-" or better or permission of the instructor. (FILM, GE2C)

FREN 124. Individu et Societe. 4 Units.

This course is the exploration of the construction of the self and its relation to the social in various periods in French culture through literature and film. The course focuses on universality and difference, the autobiographical project, social determinism, exclusion and revolt. Students examine works by Madame de Lafayette, Laclos, Rousseau, Votaire, Diderot, Balzac, Sand, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Zola, Gide, Camus, Ba, Modiano and others. This course is occasionally offered in English as FREN 051. Prerequisite: FREN 025 with a "C-" or better or permission of the instructor.

FREN 126. Penseurs et Philosophes. 4 Units.

Students study the French moralists, essayists and philosophers from the Renaissance to the present with a focus on the history of French though and its preferred fields of speculation. Selected readings are from Montaigne, Pascal, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Sartre, Camus, de Beauvoir, Foucault, Wittig and others. This course is taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 025 with a "C-" or better or permission of the instructor.

FREN 128. Images et Voix de Femmes. 4 Units.

Students study images and voices of women from medieval times to the present. The course includes an analysis of "la condition feminine" in the French literary and cultural context with a focus on authors that include Marie de France, Louis Labe, Mme de Lafayette, George Sand, Colette, Wittig, Nemirovsky and others. The course is in French. Prerequisite: FREN 025 with a "C-" or better or permission of the instructor. It is occasionally offered in English as FREN 051. May be repeated with permission of the instructor. (GEND)

HIST 061. Global History of Food. 4 Units.

The scope of the course is global, covering civilizations of Asia, America, Africa and Europe and how these cultures domesticated unique staples, which literally enabled these civilizations to expand and flourish. The course covers history of the interaction of humans with food resources from earliest hunting and gathering societies to the present. The major theme of the course is the process of globalization, imperialism and the growth of capitalist enterprise and the cost to indigenous cultures and traditional farming practices and how these processes were shaped by trade in food. (GE1C)

HIST 114. Modern Germany. 4 Units.

This course addresses politics and the social and cultural movements that shaped German history. In the last one hundred years, Germany has decisively shaped the world we live in, The country's history is framed by two unifications; Bismarck's unification in 1871 and the reunification of Germany in 1989 after the forty year-long Cold War split. The time between these dates was like a terrible roller coaster. Twice Germany tried to become a world leader and dominate large areas of land and people, Both times it failed but not without first bringing war and destruction to tens of millions of people. Good times included the rapid industrialization in the last decades of the nineteenth century, the "roaring twenties" in the metropolis Berlin, the miraculous economic recovery after 1945, and the euphoric atmosphere after the fall of the Berlin Wall. How can we explain these events and developments? Who are the Germans?

HIST 142. Modern Chinese History. 4 Units.

China's modern history is dramatic. Civil wars, foreign invasions, revolutions, high hopes, heroism, betrayed and bitterness marked what some called China's century of humiliation (ca. 1842-1950). The Chinese monarchy that collapsed in 1911 was replaced with a constitutional republic that never managed to achieve the heroic modernity imagined by its fervent patriots. The People's Republic of China sought to re-invent Chinese society from top to bottom and create a rich and powerful nation. The grimly spectacular failures to achieve this goal left many disappointed. Today, China is still run by a communist party but the newly assertive nation is now heralded by many as the next superpower. In this course, students gain specialized knowledge of events, individuals and ideas that shaped this tumultuous period. The focus is especially on the tension between westernization and modernization.

HIST 143. Japan in War and Peace. 4 Units.

In this course, you gain a broad overview of the processes, events and individuals in Japan’s history since 1800, a period of terrible war and uncertain peace. The historical vulnerabilities of its Pacific Rim location – including both natural disasters and international political rivalries – have been a constant throughout its history. Although life got better for most as the country raced from its feudal past to become an industrial and military giant, the nation could not escape the geopolitical rivalries that brought total war and foreign occupation to its lands for the first time in history. Its 1946 “Peace Constitution” helped lay the foundation for Japan’s global economic clout but did not extend Japan’s political interests in the same way. In 2011, its natural vulnerabilities were brought into focus again by the tsunami and nuclear accident that shook the nation’s confidence. The course concludes with a survey of contemporary East Asian international relations in which South Korea and China have become partners and rivals to Japan. As a seminar for History majors, the course is designed to focus especially on conceptual and theoretical consideration of the facts of Japanese history. This course satisfies the Asia requirement for History majors. This course also counts towards the Asian Studies major.

HIST 151. People's History of Mexico. 4 Units.

This course surveys the history of Mexico from its origins in pre-Columbian civilizations to the present day. In the process, students examine major historical themes and developments - the society and culture of the Aztecs and Mayas, the distinctive features of the colonial empire, the eras of Independence and of Revolution, modernization and post-modernity - as experienced by or as expressions of the actions and aspirations of Mexico's people. The course focuses on the historical experiences and struggles of Mexico's diverse ethnic and social groups and foregrounds their roles in the development of a uniquely Mexican nation. (GE1C, GEND)

JAPN 170. Japanese Literature in Translation. 4 Units.

A survey of Japanese literature from the 8th century to the present is covered with an emphasis on the unique body of prose, poetry and drama that developed during this thousand-year epoch - mostly in relative isolation from the rest of the world - which represents a brilliant literary heritage rarely matched anywhere in the world. This course is taught in English.

JAPN 180. Modern Japanese Fiction. 4 Units.

Students study Japanese fiction as a literary genre after 1867 and up to the present. This course examines representative works by Natsume Soseki and Mori Ogai, the greatest figures among the early modern novelists, and also deals with several leading authors of the post-war period that include Mishima Yukio and Abe Kobo. The readings are in Japanese. Prerequisite: JAPN 125 or JAPN 126 with a "C-" or better, or permission of the instructor.

RUSS 073. Russian Culture and Civilization. 4 Units.

Students examine the major cultural and artistic developments in Russia from the founding of the Kievan state to the 20th century. The course includes readings, lectures, discussions and student presentations on Russian literature and art as well as a survey of major literary works of the Golden Age of Russian literature. There is extensive use of audiovisual aids, and the course is taught in English.

RUSS 120. Contemporary Russian Film. 4 Units.

This is a 4-unit course designed for a general audience. No knowledge of Russian is required; lectures and readings are entirely in English. All the movies that are screened have English subtitles. This course is an overview of contemporary Russian film as representation and reflection of Russian cultural values and political and economic changes for the 1980s to the present. Students see and discuss works of major film directors in their social, political, historical, and cultural context. They learn about new cultural trends, the relationship between culture and officialdom, as well as peculiarities of national self-perception (the Russian Idea), gender/ethnicity based interpretations, and artistic realities in Russian film. (FILM, GE2C)

SPAN 112. Civilización española. 4 Units.

This course is a systematic survey of Hispanic literature and an overview of Spanish Peninsular culture and history through literature and art. Representative works from the Middle Ages to the contemporary period are studied in the context of intellectual history and local and international historic developments. Prerequisite recommended: SPAN 101 with a "C-" or better.

SPAN 128. Teatro hispánico. 4 Units.

A study of the works of major playwrights of the Spanish-speaking world. Writers, periods and regional focus varies. Prerequisite recommended: SPAN 101 or SPAN 103 with a "C-" or better.

SPAN 135. Literatura del boom latinoamericano. 4 Units.

This course is an analytical study of the novels of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Carlos Fuentes, and Mario Vargas Llosa, among others. The writers of the "Boom" are an important focus in the overview of literary trends as well as the cultures of Columbia, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, Chile, and other Latin American countries. Recommended: SPAN 101 and SPAN 103 with a "C-" or better.

SIS Regional Courses

ARTH 009. Survey of World Art After 1400. 4 Units.

A continuation of ARTH 007, this course surveys the history of world art from the fifteenth century to the present and considers major works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the applied arts. The course pays particular attention to situating works of art in their aesthetic, social, and cultural contexts and it also provides an introduction to the discipline of art history. (GE2C)

ARTH 112. 19th Century European Art. 4 Units.

Major artists and artistic movements of the period are explored and include Neoclassicism, Romanticiscm, Realism and Impressionism. Students analyze the effects of gender upon representation and artistic practice, the effects of politics and class upon visual representation and the impact of urbanization. Painting, sculpture, photography, and architecture are considered. Art historical methods that include formalism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, and gender theory are explored. (GE2C, GEND)

ARTH 114. 20th Century Art and Film. 4 Units.

Major styles of the 20th century that include Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism, etc., and their appearance in visual arts, theater design, and film are explored. Students also evaluate how Western European artists borrowed imagery from other cultures and their relationship to colonialist concerns. Students also consider representations of the body and how this imagery relates to gender constructions. The effects of urbanization upon the artistic enterprise and the development of abstract and non-objective art are also considered. This course satisfies a requirement of Film Studies minor. (FILM, GE2C, GEND)

HIST 011. Western Civilization II. 4 Units.

This course is an introductory survey of the history of Western Civilization from the sixteenth century to the present. The class explores some of the great political, social and economic transformations that led to the Western world as we know it today. The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment permanently changed humans’ view of the world. Modern states and new forms of governments emerged as the French and Industrial Revolutions undermined the political and economic order. The rise of nationalism and totalitarianism led to catastrophes in the twentieth century. After the Cold War, we faced new problems that pushed us to take stock of where we are at the beginning of the new millennium. (GE2B)

HIST 031. East Asian Civilization II. 4 Units.

This course is a survey of East Asian Civilizations from the 19th century to the present. The course covers China and Japan as well as Korea, Singapore and Vietnam and the class focuses on East Asian transformation from traditional societies to modern ones as a result of confrontation with the West. The course examines East Asian political, economic and cultural histories and traditions, providing a model of modernization different from that of the West. (GE1C)

HIST 041. The Problem with Latin America. 4 Units.

Since independence from Spain in the early nineteenth century Latin America has been plagued with struggles to achieve political stability, social justice, and economic development. Though an analysis of social movements, this course focuses on salient issues in the history of the independent nations of Latin America from the 1820s to the present and emphasizes the development of diverse societies and cultures. Students examine issues of state building, labor movements, inter-regional conflicts, and interethnic relations. The course uses a variety of sources - films, lectures, readings, and discussions - in an attempt to understand how social movements shaped and were shaped by economic and political forces. Finally, the class studies how colonial legacies, neocolonial ties and globalization have affected Latin America and its people. (GE1C, GEND)

HIST 111. Europe in Turmoil 1900-1945. 4 Units.

This first fifty years of the twentieth century were years of turmoil for Europe. Two world wars left the countries in ashes and devastated the political, social and political order of Europe. A communist revolution took place in Russia that shook other places in the world. The rise of Nazism in Germany led to the Holocaust. In between these enormous crises, there were years where people hoped for a new era of peace, growth and democracy. This course examines the origins of the conflicts, the course of events and their legacy for our societies today. (GE1C)

HIST 112. History of the Holocaust. 4 Units.

The Holocaust remains a unique and ultimately incomprehensible event in human history. Nevertheless, or perhaps because of this dilemma, it teaches us many profound ideas that we should never forget. This course examines the role of the perpetrators, the attitudes of the bystanders, and the reaction of the victims. The class looks at the emergence of Nazism, the life and career of Adolf Hitler and his helpers, and the implementation and execution of mass murder. How did other countries respond to the Holocaust? How did survivors live with the memory of the horrific events? How do we remember the Holocaust today? The course also analyzes the portrayal of the Holocaust in popular film and media today. (DVSY)

HIST 113. Europe Since 1945. 4 Units.

Since the end of World War II, Europe experienced a period of peace and stability unprecedented in its history. This course examines the emergence of Europe out of the rubble, the new postwar order, the division of Europe during the cold war, and the political, economic and social changes in modern Europe. The class looks at the building and the collapse of the Berlin Wall, life behind the Iron Curtain, the break-up of European empires and the end of colonialism. European life and societies changed dramatically with the establishment of the European Union, the students' revolt in the 1960s and the women's movement. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, new hopes and problems have replaced Cold War fears. The class also examines these changes and look at Europe at the beginning of a new millennium. (GE1C, GEND)

HIST 140. Southeast Asia and the West. 4 Units.

In this course examines the history of the "lands below the winds" - maritime and mainland southeast Asia - from their epochs of pre-modern greatness to the present as well as the lands of Southeast Asia as both a regional and global crossroads. Southeast Asians were connected with other civilizations through trade and religion early and consistently. Topics include the glories of Angkor and Khmer civilization, the spice trade and the world economy, and the spread of Islam. The course also focus on the European and U.S. colonization of the region's states and their subsequent independence struggles, with in-depth consideration of the Philippines, the Indo-Chinese wars and the events leading to the world's most destructive genocide under the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia.

HIST 150. Women in Latin America. 4 Units.

The history of Latin America is still, in many ways, the history of male leaders and heroes. This course analyzes gender as both a field of resistance and of the creation and internalization of social norms. Students explore the gendered roles of women and men in Latin America but focus primarily on the lives of women. The course also examines the institutions and ideas that have expanded and limited their place in history and society. Through the use of art, literature, film, and religious forms, students study the cultural attitudes that have affected Latin American women since pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include: Indian women and the conquest of Latin America, the Virgin Mary, women and Revolution, and icons such as Eva Peron and Frida Kahlo.

POLS 141. Western European Comparative Politics. 4 Units.

This course is a comparative analysis of the political and economic forces that have shaped the advanced industrial states of Western Europe. Topics include: 1) state-building, nation-building and industrialization; 2) political and economic reconstruction of France, Great Britain and Germany; 3) contemporary problems facing the advanced capitalist states of Western Europe.

POLS 146. Latin American Politics. 4 Units.

Students study the political processes and governmental structures of Latin American states, and focus on Mexico and Brazil, as well as certain other South and Central American countries. Selective attention is given to the expanding regional and international relations of Latin America.

POLS 148. Politics of the Middle East. 4 Units.

This course is a comparative study of contemporary politics in the Middle East, and it emphasizes the problems of development and the background, issues and political forces involved in the Arab-Israeli conflict.

SIS Comparing World Religions

ANTH 164. Anthropology of Food. 4 Units.

The anthropological study of food examines human foodways within a bio-cultural and cross-cultural context. Anthropologists study humans and human culture across space and evolutionary time; this includes the examination of cultural patterns and social institutions. Food requires hunting, gathering, growing, storage, distribution, preparation, display, serving, and disposal, all of which are social and cultural activities. This course explores the important role of food production, preparation, and eating in different cultures, as well as the symbolism and economic importance of food. Students focus on the current transformations of the world food system, through processes of globalization, the growth of new technologies, human migration and fast food. The counter-movement for localization and ‘slow food’ are also explored. Students can expect to take part in some cooking and eating as well. Prerequisite: ANTH 053 or ANTH 054.

ARTH 116. Contemporary World Art 1945 to Present. 4 Units.

This course explores major artists, styles, and movements in world art from 1945 to the present. Gestural abstraction, Pop, Photo Realism, Happenings, Video, Performance, Conceptual and Political art as well as film are a few of the trends that are considered. Ever-expanding notions of what constitutes art in this pluralistic era is also examined. This course satisfies a requirement of the Film Studies minor. (FILM, GE2C, GEND)

BIOL 035. Environment: Concepts and Issues. 4 Units.

Principles of ecology as they bear on world environmental problems are introduced with an emphasis on biological aspects of world problems and on the interrelationships between culture and environment. Global dimension of population, resources, food, energy and environmental impact are considered. Course does not count toward a biology major. (ENST, GE3C)

BUSI 169. International Management. 4 Units.

Develops cross-cultural awareness through understanding of social, political, economical, and historical influences on managerial practice. Methods include lectures, readings, videos, role-plays, and reports (written and oral). Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

COMM 143. Intercultural Communication. 4 Units.

This course analyzes the major variables affecting interpersonal communication between persons of different cultural backgrounds. (DVSY, ETHC, GE1C)

ECON 125. Economic Development. 4 Units.

Examines the plight of the world’s poor countries. Discussions of the extent of world poverty. and a review of the evolution of ideas on the topic of economic development over the past three decades are included. The course considers the following types of questions: What are the causes of development and/or underdevelopment? Are Third World countries merely at a primitive stage of development analogous to European countries prior to the Industrial Revolution? What are the roles of climate, the legal system, education, health and sanitation, natural resources, technology, multinational corporations, religious beliefs and so on? Are rich countries making a meaningful effort to aid poor countries? Can we, or even should we, help? Should emphasis be placed on the agricultural or industrial sector? This course is also listed as an SIS course. Prerequisites: ECON 053 and ECON 055 or permission of instructor.

INTL 123. Literature Across Cultures. 4 Units.

On the basis of selected works taken from the vast body of contemporary world literature, the course surveys the variety of literary expression from cultures around the globe. Although often separated physically by continents, creative writers respond to fundamental human dilemmas in ways characteristic of their craft as well as individuals and members of a culture. Students read, compare, and discuss these responses as they have been formed in Lagos, Berlin or Sao Paulo, Tokyo, Paris or Mobile. Emphasis is on conflicts that arise from post colonialism. General Education IC.

MHIS 006. Music of the World's People. 3 Units.

Students examine folk, primitive, popular, and classical musical traditions of Asia, Africa, Europe and North and South America. Open to all students. (DVSY, GE1C)

POLS 150. Political Development. 4 Units.

This course is a general introduction to the problems and politics of post-colonial or lesser developed countries. Case studies from Asia, Africa and Latin America are included.

POLS 152. Politics of Asia. 4 Units.

This course is a general political introduction to modern East, South-East and South Asia. The course includes a survey of geography, history and culture and it uses selected case studies in all three areas, an exploration of problems of development and modernization, as well as regional interaction and the relation of Asia to the West. (GE1C)

POLS 168. Comparative Foreign Policy. 4 Units.

Students examine of foreign policy making around the world, across major powers, middle powers, and small states. The course begins with a study of the different theories that try to explain why nations make the choices they do in the international arena, and then it considers the validity of those theories as students look at cases from the United States to China to New Zealand and a number of stops in between. Prior to the completion of a basic course in political science is recommended.

RELI 134. World Religions. 4 Units.

Students examine fundamental religious questions as developed in major religions of the world which includes primal religious experiences in African, Australian and Native American traditions. Special attention is also given to Islam, in context with other Abrahamic traditions, as the fastest growing religion in the world. Some attention is given to historical development and to major personalities, but attention centers on the religious questions as developed in each religious system. (GE2B)

RELI 135. Asian Religious Traditions. 4 Units.

Students study the traditional religions of India, China, Tibet and Japan, in attempt to delineate the spirituality, beauty, and wisdom of these traditions. The course traces the rich historical and cultural heritages of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, the Taoist ways of achieving harmony in the world, and the melding of nature and ritual life in Shinto. Each semester one or two of these religions is studied in depth to investigate how they influence society, politics and culture in the countries where they spread. The academic approach is supplemented by practical learning of mediation, energy-regulations and ritual. (GE2B)

SOCI 108. Food, Culture and Society. 4 Units.

Are you what you eat, or do you eat what you are? This course focuses on the role of food in society, with an emphasis on understanding food in its social and cultural contexts. Topics include food and nutrition; problems of over- and under-eating; food fads; food sacrifices and taboos; food and social and ethnic identity; and the global politics of food. Although beginning with a look at American food ways, the course is highly cross-cultural and comparative in nature. (DVSY, ETHC, GE1C)

SOCI 114. Social and Cultural Change. 4 Units.

Why do some social movements fail to produce social change, while others succeed? The goal of this course is to introduce students to sociological theories of social movements, analyzing the reasons they emerge at particular historical moments, and the types of political and cultural changes they can produce. Through a review of case studies that include the women’s, gay rights, abortion, civil rights, environmental, and peace movements, the course identifies key analytical questions and research strategies for studying contemporary social movements in depth. This course focuses largely on US examples, though cross-cultural comparisons add depth to the discussions. Prerequisite: a course in sociology or permission of instructor.

SIS Global & Int'l Interaction

ANTH 170. Culture and Economy. 4 Units.

This course provides an anthropological approach to the study of economic behavior in a cross-cultural context. Are there places in the world where people don’t care about the latest cell phones or clothing fashions? Do people always seek to buy the most goods that they can with their money? Do different cultures define rational, maximizing behavior differently? In this class students explore the variety of different ways in which people produce, exchange and consume goods and how these processes are embedded in social and cultural institutions. Throughout the semester, students read ethnographic articles and case studies that discuss other peoples’ economic lives and touch on important issues of global poverty and development. Topics include markets, gifts, commodities, property rights, systems of production and exchange, and change within local and global economies. Prerequisite: ANTH 053 or ANTH 054.

ANTH 172. Culture and Power. 4 Units.

What is power? How are power relations configured differently across cultures? How is power institutionalized and contested in an increasingly interconnected world? The theme that unites all these concerns is the politics of everyday life: how power works in and through culture to shape the lives of individuals and societies. Topics of discussion include: conflict and conflict resolution,; law and custom, leadership and authority, social and cultural control, ritual and symbolism, gender, ethnicity, and identity politics, nationalism and colonialism, representation, agency and political subjectivity, civil society organizations and social movements, borders, boundaries and citizenship. (DVSY)

BUSI 163. International Financial Management. 4 Units.

This course is an analysis of management problems that arise in an international financial environment. Specific consideration is given to financial risk (s), management and international financial markets. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 165. International Marketing. 4 Units.

Students examine the environment for marketing across borders. The course covers marketing practice, policies and strategies in the multinational setting. Students complete a global screening of countries and draw up a marketing plan and strategy for a given product. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

ECON 071. Global Economic Issues. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to international trade, international finance and economic development. Economic principles and tools are used to understand the interconnected global economy. Topics include trade theory and policy; regional and multilateral trading system; trade and climate change; balance of payments; foreign exchange markets and exchange rate determination; and the role of foreign aid private capital flows and trade policy in economic development. Prerequisites: ECON 053; ECON 051 or 055. ECON 071 cannot be taken for credit if the student has taken or is concurrently enrolled in ECON 121 or ECON 123. ECON 071 is also listed as an SIS course. (ENST)

ECON 121. International Trade. 4 Units.

Students study the economic theory surrounding the exchange of goods and services between countries and the application of this theory to current international issues. Topics include the determination of world trade patterns, the effects of changing trade patterns on income distribution within a country; the pros and cons of trade barriers; trade concerns of developing countries; and the effects of international trade on the world’s natural environment. This course is also listed as an SIS course. Prerequisites: ECON 053 and ECON 055.

ECON 123. International Finance. 4 Units.

Students study the financial side of international economics. Topics include balance of payments accounts and the foreign exchange market; exchange rate determination and the macro economy; the international debt crisis and capital flight; and the history of international monetary systems. This course is also listed as an SIS course. Prerequisites: ECON 053 and ECON 055.

HIST 062. History of Warfare. 4 Units.

Taking a global approach, this course examines the history of warfare from ancient times through the present. It looks at how warfare was shaped, and shaped by, social, political and technological changes. After briefly looking at warfare in ancient, traditional and medieval societies, the class turns to the era of modern war beginning in the seventeenth century. From then on, technological and social changes transformed the conduct of war in many parts of the world. The course ends with a consideration of nuclear capability and terrorism. In class assignments, students have an opportunity to pursue their own interests on a variety of military related themes, events, or issues. (GE2B)

HIST 065. Women and War. 4 Units.

This course takes an international approach to studying the history of women and war. The objective is to better understand how women’s experience during war has changed over time and differed for women in a variety of countries. The class begins by studying the mythology of women and war, connecting ancient Greek war goddess Athena with present-day Hollywood depictions of women warriors. Lectures then focus on the theories positioning women in war history, and proceeds with a survey of women’s participation in several modern wars, comparing women’s experience in the U.S. with women in other parts of the world. Finally, the course ends with an in-depth discussion of several key themes in the histories of women and war: domestic ideology, prostitution, nursing, soldiering, war work, and protest/peace politics. (GEND)

INTL 174. Global Environmental Policy. 4 Units.

Students examine the major environmental problems that confront the world today and an analysis of specific policies formulated to address those problems. Among the issues to be studied are deforestation, atmospheric and marine pollution, climate change, ozone depletion, and species loss. Prerequisite: POLS 051. (ENST)

POLS 051. Introduction to International Relations. 4 Units.

This course introduces the major issues of international politics and the analytical approaches applied to their study. Topics include: the causes of war, intervention, pursuit of economic prosperity and managing global resources. (GE1C)

POLS 162. International Organization. 4 Units.

Students examine the role of international organization in the contemporary global political system. Major theories and approaches in the field are studied in conjunction with topics such as interstate conflict and peacekeeping, arms control and nonproliferation, human rights, economic relations between developed and developing countries, food and nutrition and management of the global commons. Prerequisite: POLS 051 or permission of instructor. (PLAW)

POLS 164. International Political Economy. 4 Units.

Students examine the major analytical and substantive issues in the field of international political economy and explore the political and economic problems generated by growing interdependence among advanced industrial states and the conflicts between industrialized and developing countries over the structure and functioning of the postwar international economic order. Prerequisite: POLS 051.

POLS 166. International Conflict and Conflict Management. 4 Units.

This course is a study of the sources and nature of conflict and methods of conflict management in the international arena. The focus is to identify and understand the kinds and functions of nonviolent conflict management now in use. Topics include international law, international regimes, negotiation and arbitration. Prerequisite: POLS 051 or permission of instructor.

POLS 170. U.S. Foreign Policy. 4 Units.

Students examine of the major developments and current issues in U.S. foreign policy and various analytical approaches to their study. Topics include: U.S. diplomatic history, the processes and structures by which the U.S. government develops and implements foreign policy. Emphasis is placed on students developing the analytical capacity to pose and pursue significant puzzles about U.S. foreign policy. Prerequisite: POLS 051.

POLS 172. Inter-American Relations. 4 Units.

This course covers regional principles, laws, treaties and agreements, foreign policy formulation, hemispheric organizations, and exploration and analysis of contemporary trends in Latin American international relations.

SIS Comparative Politics
SIS Foreign Policy Courses
SIS Int'l Politics Courses

POLS 160. Theories of International Politics. 4 Units.

This course is an intensive study of the principal theories of international politics and behavior. The course covers major social scientific theories, critical approaches to theory, and international political theory. Prerequisite: POLS 051, or permission of instructor.

SIS Global Economic Relations

Learning Outcomes

1. The ability to think and communicate critically and clearly in both written and oral forms.
2. The ability to understand and apply economic, social, and political theory in the analysis of historical events and contemporary international issues.
3. The ability to communicate effectively in cross-cultural situations and to relate appropriately in a variety of cultural contexts.
4. The ability to understand, evaluate, and apply quantitative and qualitative research methods.

School of International Studies Faculty

William E. Herrin, Director and Professor of Economics, 1985, BS, Wilkes College, 1980; MA, Binghamton University, State University of New York, 1982; PhD, 1985.

Laura Bathurst, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, 2005, BA, Kansas State University, 1997; MA, University of California, Berkeley, 1999; PhD, 2005.

Arturo Giraldez, Professor, 1990, BA, Universidad Com-plutense de Madrid, 1976; MA, 1979; PhD, Spanish and Portuguese, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1990; PhD, History, University of Amsterdam, 1999.

Gerald J. Hewitt, Professor Emeritus, 1969, BA, University of Notre Dame, 1963; MA, University of Chicago, 1966; PhD, 1973.

Leonard A. Humphreys, Professor Emeritus, 1970, BS, United States Military Academy, 1945; MA, Stanford University, 1960; PhD, 1975.

Ahmed Kanna, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, 2009, BS, James Madison University, 1997; AM, Harvard University, 2000; PhD, Harvard University, 2006.

David Keefe, Associate Professor Emeritus, 1978, BS, Cornell University, 1965; PhD, University of California, Berkeley, 1980.

Yong Kyun Kim, Assistant Professor of Political Science, 2009, BS, Seoul National University, 1998; MA, Seoul National University, 2001; PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2009.

Bruce W. LaBrack, Professor Emeritus, 1975, BA, University of Arizona, 1967; MA, 1969; MPhil, Syracuse University, 1975; PhD, 1979.

Sarah M. Mathis, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, 2008, BS, Principia College, 1997; MA, University of Notre Dame, 1999; PhD, Emory University, 2008.

Daniel O'Neill, Assistant Professor of Political Science, 2010, BA, University of Texas at Austin, 1987; MA, Washington University in St. Louis, 2005; PhD, Washington University in St. Louis, 2010.

Analiese M. Richard, Associate Professor of Anthropology, 2006, BA, Southwestern University, 1999; MA, University of California, Berkeley, 2001; PhD, University of California, Berkeley, 2005.

Susan G. Sample, Associate Professor of Political Science, 1999, BA, University of Missouri, 1991; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 1996.

Elena Savelieva, Instructor, Area Studies in Russian, 1992, BA, Leningrad State University, 1969; MA, 1971.

Cortlandt B. Smith, Professor Emeritus, 1970, BA, University of California, Berkeley, 1968; MA, 1969; PhD, 1975.

Howard Moseley, Instructor, 2005, BA, University of the Pacific, 1989; JD, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, 1996.