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Electrical Engineering

Phone: (209) 946-2153
Location: Anderson Hall
Website: Electrical Engineering

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering
 

Electrical Engineering Program Educational Objectives

Through their careers in electrical engineering or related profession, Pacific graduates are expected to demonstrate the following within a few years of earning their Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering:

  • Competency in the electrical engineering profession via promotion to positions of increasing responsibility, publications, and/or conference presentations
  • Adaptability to new developments in science and technology by successfully completing or pursuing graduate education in engineering or related fields, or participating in professional development and/or industrial training courses

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

Students must complete a minimum of 120 units of academic work and a minimum of 32 units of Cooperative Education in order to earn the bachelor of science in electrical engineering.

I. General Education Requirements

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

 
Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from below in place of taking PACS 001 and PACS 002.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Two courses from the following:
Arts and Humanities
One course from the following categories:

 

 Note: 1) Only one course can come from each subcategory (A, B, or C) within each category. 2) No more than 2 courses from a single department may be applied to meet the breadth program requirements, with the exception of certain 1-unit GE IIC courses.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)
ENGR 030Engineering Ethics and Society3


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated diversity course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis


Note: Fundamental skills must be satisfied before enrolling in upper division courses. 

IV. Major Requirements

Mathematics and Science (minimum of 30 units)
MATH 051Calculus I4
MATH 053Calculus II4
MATH 055Calculus III4
MATH 057Applied Differential Equations I: ODEs4
PHYS 053Principles of Physics I5
PHYS 055Principles of Physics II5
Select one of the following science courses:4-5
General Biology with Applications for Engineers I
General Biology with Applications for Engineers II
Principles of Biology
Principles of Biology
Fundamentals of Chem
General Chemistry
General Chemistry
Select one of the following math courses:4
Introduction to Linear Algebra
Numerical Analysis
Applied Linear Algebra
Cryptography
Vector Analysis
Real Analysis I
Applied Differential Equations II
Graph Theory
Engineering Science
ECPE 005Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering1
ECPE 041Circuits3
ECPE 041LCircuits Laboratory1
ECPE 071Digital Design3
ECPE 071LDigital Design Lab1
ENGR 010Dean's Seminar1
Electrical Engineering Core
COMP 051Introduction to Computer Science4
COMP 053Data Structures4
ECPE 121Digital Signal Processing4
ECPE 127Random Signals3
ECPE 131Electronics3
ECPE 131LElectronics Lab1
ECPE 141Advanced Circuits4
ECPE 172Microcontrollers4
ECPE 194Core Assessment Exam (CAE)0
ECPE 195Senior Project I2
ECPE 196Senior Project II2
ENGR 025Professional Practice Seminar1
Select one of the following:4
Applied Electromagnetics
Electricity and Magnetism
Technical Electives
Select one of the following:3-4
Power Electronics
Energy Conversion
Power System Analysis
Select one of the following:4
Digital Image Processing
Power Electronics
VLSI Design
Autonomous Robotics
Automatic Control Systems
Communication Systems
Select two of the following:6-8
Any ECPE course listed above
Bioelectricity
Solid State Devices
Computer Systems and Networks
Computer Organization and Arch
Advanced Digital Design
Computer Networking
Computer Network Security
Independent Study
Undergraduate Research
Solar Energy Engineering
Systems Analysis and Control
Engineering Science Elective
Select one of the following:3-4
Civil Engineering Graphics
Engineering Mechanics I (Statics)
Materials Science- Properties and Measurements
Thermodynamics I
Mechanical Engineering Graphics
Upper Division SOECS Elective
Select one 100 or 200 level BENG, CIVL, COMP, ECPE, ENGR, EMGT, or MECH course *3-4
Cooperative Education (Minimum 32 units that include)
ENGR 181Professional Practice1-18
ENGR 182Professional Practice1-18
ENGR 183Professional Practice1-18
*

 Excludes: ENGR 150ENGR 181,ENGR 182, and ENGR 183.

Electrcl & Computer Engr Courses

ECPE 005. Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1 Unit.

This course introduces students to various sub-disciplines of Electrical and Computer Engineering and to the tools, both hardware and software, that are used in Electrical & Computer Engineering. Prerequisite: ENGR 010 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 041. Circuits. 3 Units.

Students study concepts of voltage, current, power, energy. Topics include ideal circuit elements and their I/V characteristics, Kirchhoff's laws, circuit analysis using node voltage and mesh current methods Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, maximum power transfer, and operational amplifier circuits. The course examines step response of 1st order (RC, RL) and 2nd order (RLC) circuits, phasor analysis, impedance calculations, sinusoidal steady state response, instantaneous, average, and reactive power, frequency response, bandwidth of first order, and lowpass and highpass filters. Prerequisite: PHYS 055; MATH 055; COMP 051 or ENGR 019 with a "C-" or better. Corequisite: ECPE 041L.

ECPE 041L. Circuits Laboratory. 1 Unit.

Students study the use of standard test equipment to make DC and AC measurements and characterize electric circuits. Circuit simulation is taught with software tools, and data analysis is emphasized. Corequisite: ECPE 041.

ECPE 071. Digital Design. 3 Units.

Students study number systems, binary arithmetic, and Boolean logic. Topics include the analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits and the use of MSI, LSI, FPGA and CPLD devices. Prerequisite: Fundamental Math Skills requirement; COMP 051 or ENGR 019 with a "C-" or better. Recommended: ECPE 071L.

ECPE 071L. Digital Design Lab. 1 Unit.

This course involves laboratory treatment of the concepts discussed in ECPE 071. Prerequisites: Fundamental Math Skills requirement; COMP 051 or ENGR 019 with a "C-" or better. Corequisite: ECPE 071.

ECPE 121. Digital Signal Processing. 4 Units.

Students analyze discrete-time signals and systems using z transforms and Fourier transforms, the fast Fourier transform and its applications, digital filters and their applications and implementation of DSP algorithms using Matlab and Simulink. Prerequisites: ECPE 041 and MATH 057 with a “C-“ or better.

ECPE 124. Digital Image Processing. 4 Units.

This course is the analysis and design of algorithms in digital image processing. Topics include: image formation, file format, pixel-based processing, object recognition, filtering and edge detection, image transforms, segmentation, stereo-vision, and motion tracking. Prerequisites: COMP 053, ECPE 121 with a “C-“ or better.

ECPE 127. Random Signals. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to probability and statistics in engineering applications. Students will become familiar with discrete and continuous random variables and their probability models. Topics include counting methods, reliability problems, probability mass functions (PMF), probability density functions (PDF), cumulative distribution functions (CDF), conditional PDF’s, expected value and variance, joint and marginal PDF’s and CDF’s, functions of two random variables. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills, MATH 055 with a “C-“ or better.

ECPE 131. Electronics. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to semiconductor physics. Topics include modeling, analysis, and simulation of analog and digital circuits containing diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and MOSFETs. Other topics include analysis and design of single stage amplifiers, frequency response of amplifiers, gain, bandwidth, DC biasing, and small signal analysis of amplifiers. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 041, ECPE 041L, ECPE 071, ECPE 071L; MATH 055, PHYS 055, completion of CHEM 024 or CHEM 025 or CHEM 027 or BIOL 051 or BIOL 061 or BENG 053 or BENG 063 with a "C-" or better. Prerequisite that may be taken concurrently: ECPE 071, ECPE 071L Corequisite: ECPE 131L.

ECPE 131L. Electronics Lab. 1 Unit.

Students examine the use of standard electronic test equipment and simulation tools to analyze, design, and test electronic circuits. Emphasis on analog circuits. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills. Corequisite: ECPE 131.

ECPE 133. Solid State Devices. 4 Units.

This course introduces concepts related to the crystal structure of semiconductors and electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of semiconductors. Dynamics of carriers under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions are presented as a frame work for understanding the behavior of a number of devices including Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) and Hetero-junction Bipolar (HBT) devices. On such a background, the course builds an understanding of the latest advances in the field. This course is cross listed with PHYS 170. Prerequisite: MATH 057, PHYS 055 with a “C-“ or better.

ECPE 135. Power Electronics. 4 Units.

Switch-Mode DC-DC converters, Feedback control of converters, Rectifiers and power factor correction circuits, switch mode DC power supplies, applications to motor control and renewable energy integration to the grid. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 131 and ECPE 131L with a "C-" or better. Prerequisite may be taken concurrently: ECPE 121 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 136. VLSI Design. 4 Units.

Students examine issues in VLSI design. Topics include logic families, sizing, timing models, fabrication, layout, high speed and low power design tradeoffs, circuit simulation and device modeling. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 071, ECPE 071L, ECPE 131, ECPE 131L with a "C-" or better. (Spring odd years).

ECPE 141. Advanced Circuits. 4 Units.

Analysis and design of circuits in the continuous time domain. Topics include: frequency response, Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, stability and feedback. Applications include high-order filter design and controls. Prerequisites: ECPE 041, ECPE 041L, and MATH 057 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 144. Applied Electromagnetics. 4 Units.

The purpose of this course is for students to gain an understanding of transmission lines and field theory as it applies to communication circuits and systems. Electromagnetic wave propagation, reflection, and transmission through common materials are examined. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; PHYS 055, MATH 057, ECPE 041 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 155. Autonomous Robotics. 4 Units.

This course is an overview of the design of autonomous robotics. Students study architectures for robot organization and control, configurations of fixed and mobile robots, sensors and actuators. Students also study the design of algorithms and knowledge representations. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; COMP 053 and ECPE 172 with a "C-" or better or permission of instructor.

ECPE 161. Automatic Control Systems. 4 Units.

Students study component and system transfer functions, open and closed loop response; stability criteria; applications to engineering systems. this course include a laboratory. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills and ECPE 121 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 162. Communication Systems. 4 Units.

Students examine signal characterization in time and frequency domains. Topics include baseband communication, pulse code modulation, multiplexing, complex envelope representation of bandpass signals. AM, FM, and digital modulations. Students also examine applications to radio, television, telephone, and cellular phone systems. A laboratory is included. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills and ECPE 121 with a "C-" or better. (Spring).

ECPE 163. Energy Conversion. 4 Units.

Students study three phase power systems. Topics include magnetic circuits, transformers, rotating machines: DC, induction, and synchronous machines as well as equivalent circuits and characteristic curves of transformers and rotating machines, renewable energy sources and technologies. the course includes a laboratory. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 041 and ECPE 041L; PHYS 055 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 165. Power System Analysis. 3 Units.

Students study electrical power generation and transmission, Three-phase systems, power system component models, per-unit system and single line diagrams, power flow analysis. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills and ECPE 041 with a "C-" or better. Junior standing.

ECPE 170. Computer Systems and Networks. 4 Units.

This course is a comprehensive and holistic examination of the modern computing environment. Students gain an understanding of the various hardware and software components that enable computers and networks to process information and execute applications. Students learn to apply this knowledge in the development of efficient and robust software applications. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 071, COMP 053 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 172. Microcontrollers. 4 Units.

Students study the design and implementation of digital monitoring and control systems that use micro-controllers. Topics include hardware and software development, interfacing input and output devices, assembly and C programming as well as representative applications. The course includes a laboratory. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 071 and ECPE 071L with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 173. Computer Organization and Arch. 3 Units.

The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of how a complete modern computer system operates. Students learn about design of control, datapath and arithmetic-logic units. Other topics include pipelining, memory hierarchy and assembly language programming. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 170; ECPE 172 or ECPE 174 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 174. Advanced Digital Design. 4 Units.

Students learn how to analysis, design, and implement synchronous state machines using programmable logic devices. Topics include CAD-based simulation and development that use schematic capture and hardware description languages, and representative applications. The course includes a laboratory. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 071 and ECPE 071L with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 177. Computer Networking. 4 Units.

Students study computer networks and the Internet. Topics include LAN and WAN architectures, packet switched networks and routing, the 7-layer OSI model and Internet protocol stack, socket programming and client/server systems as well as wireless security. The course includes a laboratory. Also listed as COMP 177. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; COMP 053 and ECPE 170 with a "C-" or better. Junior or Senior standing.

ECPE 178. Computer Network Security. 3 Units.

This course is an examination of the pervasive security threats related to the Internet, data communications and networking. Topics include TCP/IP protocols, authentication, encryption, malware, cybercrime, and social engineering. Emphasis is on computer and network attack methods, their detection, prevention and analysis, and the integration of the tools and techniques employed in this effort. Includes lab. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills and ECPE 170 or COMP 175 with a “C-“ or better.

ECPE 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Special individual projects are undertaken under the direction of one or more faculty members knowledgeable in the particular field of study. Permission of department chairperson and faculty members involved.

ECPE 194. Core Assessment Exam (CAE). 0 Units.

Each student in the ECPE department is required to take the Core Assessment Exam (CAE). The CAE tests students knowledge of the material covered in the core courses and in basic math. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 041, ECPE 041L, ECPE 071, ECPE 071L, MATH 055, PHYS 055, COMP 051 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 195. Senior Project I. 2 Units.

This course instructs students in the application of design processes and teamwork. Topics include multiple interdisciplinary team design experiences of increasing complexity. Projects incorporate consideration of engineering standards and realistic constraints such as economics, the environment, sustainability, manufacturability, and safety. Students are given instruction and practice in documentation and as well as oral and written communications skills. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 071, ECPE 071L, ECPE 121, ECPE 131, ECPE 131L with a "C-" or better. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: ECPE 194 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 196. Senior Project II. 2 Units.

This capstone design course integrates earlier studies, including ECPE 195, to perform interdisciplinary team design projects. Student design teams define a requirements document, a test document, and a design document for a prescribed product, then design, build and test a prototype. Complete documentation is expected. Final oral and written reports and project demonstrations are required. Prerequisites: Completion of all Fundamental Skills; ECPE 194 and ECPE 195 with a "C-" or better.

ECPE 197. Undergraduate Research. 1-4 Units.

This course offers applied or basic research in electrical and/or computer engineering under faculty supervision. Permission of faculty supervisor and department chair. The student must be in good academic standing.

Students graduating with a BS in Electrical Engineering will have:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability. 
  • an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams. 
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. 
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. 
  • an ability to communicate effectively. 
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context. 
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning. 
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues. 
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Electrical Engineering Faculty

Jennifer Ross, Associate Dean and Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1993, BS in Electrical Engineering University of Illinois, 1988; MS in Electrical Engineering, University of California Berkeley, 1990. PhD in Electrical Engineering University of California Berkeley, 1993; Solid state, short wavelength lasers, analog circuits and devices.

Kenneth F. Hughes, Chair and Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1993, BS, Information and Computer Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1985; MS, Computer Science, University of South Florida, 1989; PhD, Computer Science and Engineering, University of South Florida, 1994. Robotics, sensors and sensor fusion, computer vision, artificial intelligence, embedded systems, microprocessors and microcontrollers, digital systems.

Rahim Khoie, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Program Director of Engineering Physics, 2002, BSEE, 1977, Abadan Institute of Technology, Abadan, Iran; MS, 1980, University of Pittsburgh; PhD, 1986, University of Pittsburgh. High speed electron devices, Quantum effect devices, Solid state physics, Renewable energy, Analog and digital electronics, and Embedded Systems.

Elizabeth Basha, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2010, BS in Computer Engineering, University of the Pacific, 2003; SM in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2005; PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2010. Sensor networks, autonomous robotics, international development.

Cherian Mathews, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2005, BE in Electrical Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, India, 1987; MS in Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, 1989; PhD in Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, 1993; Statistical signal processing, Array signal processing, Real-time digital signal processing using DSP processors, power systems.

David Mueller, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2015, BS Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2006; MS Electrical Engineering, 2008; PhD Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2015, University of Missouri - Columbia. Semiconductor devices, Optical electronics, Computational intelligence, Robotics, Device simulation, Photovoltaics, Renewable energy, Device fabrication and characterization.

Fadi Muheidat, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Enginnering, 2017, BS Electrical and Computer Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, 2000; MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Columbia, Missouri, 2015; PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, 2017. Computational Intelligence, Computer Networking, Embedded Systems.

Vivek Pallipuram, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2015, BS National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirapalli, India 2008; MS Computer Engineering, Clemson University, 2010; PhD Computer Engineering, Clemson University, 2013. Computer architecture, High performance computing, Cloud computing, Machine learning, Statistics, & Digital signal processing.

Jeffrey Shafer, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2010, BS, Computer Engineering, University of Dayton, 2002; MS, Electrical Engineering, University of Dayton, 2004; PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 2010; Computer architecture, Network systems architecture, Data-intensive computing, Cloud computing, Virtualization.

Huihui Xu, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, 2014, B.E., Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China, 2006; M.S., Applied Mathematics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China, 2002; Ph.D., Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL., 2006; Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Imaging, Bio-instrumentation.