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Gladys L. Benerd School of Education

http://www.pacific.edu/education/
Phone: (209)946-2556
Location: Gladys L. Benerd School of Education

Vanessa Sheared, Dean

Degree Offered

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies

Majors Offered

Diversified
Pedagogy

Minors Offered

Teaching Professions

A Diversified Major leads to a preliminary credential for elementary teaching in California. A Pedagogy Major is designed for undergraduate students from other countries who wish to teach in their home countries.

Contents

Diversified Major (Liberal Studies)
Pedagogy Major
Multiple Subject Credentials
Single Subject Credentials
Special Education/Education Specialist Credentials
Single Subject Credentials are offered in conjunction with other University academic units
.

For more information on graduate programs see Graduate Catalog.

This is a professional school of University of the Pacific that offers programs for Bachelor of Arts, Master’s, Educational Specialist, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

Mission

The mission of the Gladys L. Benerd School of Education is to prepare thoughtful, reflective, caring, and collaborative professionals for service to diverse populations. The School of Education directs its efforts toward researching the present and future needs of schools and the community fostering intellectual and ethical growth, and developing compassion and collegiality through personalized learning experiences. Undergraduate, graduate degree, and professional preparation programs are developed in accordance with state and national accreditation standards and guidelines to ensure that students who complete these programs represent the best professional practice in their positions of future leadership in schools and the community.

Core Values of the School of Education

The core values of the School of Education include scholarship, integrity and ethical conduct, diversity, social and community responsibility, collegiality, and teaching and learning.

The History of the School of Education

The School of Education was organized at University of the Pacific in 1923 and officially recognized by the California State Department of Education on January 10, 1924. Its goals are to prepare competent personnel for service in public and private pre-elementary, elementary, secondary, and post-secondary schools; to provide programs for the in service growth of experienced school personnel, so that they may update and upgrade their understanding, knowledge, and skills in a rapidly changing educational enterprise; to provide educational leadership in cooperation with all those agencies engaged in and interested in schools; and to engage in and promote research leading to better public education.

Accreditation

The University of the Pacific was the first university in California whose professional education programs were fully approved by both the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) from bachelor’s through doctoral levels, thus permitting its professional education program graduates to be licensed upon request in 38 other states. Although teacher education is considered to be an all-University responsibility, all professional education degree and credential programs at University of the Pacific are offered and coordinated through the Gladys L. Benerd School of Education. Continuing accreditation has been conferred through the year 2018 on all eligible programs in the Benerd School of Education.

Programs in the School of Education

At the undergraduate level, programs are offered to prepare classroom teachers and special educators. At the graduate level, programs are offered to prepare instructional specialists, school psychologists, supervisors, principals, superintendents, central office personnel, and leaders in higher education, non-profit, and other organizations. Undergraduate and graduate programs through the doctorate for teachers and other educational personnel are offered by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Graduate programs through the doctorate for educational administrators are offered by the Department of Educational Administration and Leadership. Graduate programs through the doctorate for school psychologists are offered by the Department of Educational and School Psychology. Detailed requirements for a Master of Education (MEd), Master of Arts in Education (MA), Educational Specialist (EdS), Doctor of Education (EdD), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) can be found in the Graduate School Catalog.

Student Organizations

Student organizations in the School of Education include the School of Education Student Association (SESA); a student chapter of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development; a student chapter of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC); the Math, Science, and Critical Thinking Club and the Music Education Student Association (MESA).

Membership in these student organizations is open to all undergraduate students who are enrolled in the School of Education and all graduate students who are working toward a credential or an advanced degree offered through the School of Education and who have paid the ASUOP student body fees.

Facilities and Support Services

The School of Education has a state-of-the-art flexible learning classroom, and the University Library contains other comprehensive resources for students in education in its collections of books, professional periodicals, pamphlets, microfilms, and other reference materials.

The Testing Office in the School of Education is an officially designated national testing center for the subject test of the Graduate Record Examination. In addition, the Office maintains a collection of restricted psychological assessments for use by faculty and approved advanced students in the school psychology program. The Testing Office is available for proctoring services for individuals who seek to take an exam of any subject. Proctoring services are open to Pacific students, students who attend other institutions, and the general public, whether offered through another college, university, and/or private/public business. Individuals who are interested in proctoring services may call (209) 946-2559. The Testing Office is located at the Gladys L. Benerd School of Education, Room 101.

The Speech, Hearing and Language Center in the School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences provides a program for children and adults who need individual or group therapy for such challenges as stuttering, cleft palate, aphasia, cerebral palsy, articulation, and delayed speech, and it provides speech reading for the hard of hearing. Comprehensive audiological assessment is also available for children and adults.

Earning a Credential to Teach

The School of Education provides programs whereby any student in any unit of the Stockton campus can prepare for a teaching career. The School is committed to a philosophy of combining professional theory with practical fieldwork and utilizes the unique diversity of Stockton area schools as laboratories for teacher preparation. The School insists that students meet qualitative criteria. They must be strong academically, respect and relate well to children and other students, be of fine character, and be recommended by persons who know of their capabilities. In particular, they must demonstrate that they are fully committed to achieving excellence in teaching.

So that students can assess themselves, their relationships with children, and their willingness to commit to excellence in teacher preparation, any freshman or higher level student may enroll in the sequence of prerequisite courses prior to the professional course sequence and directed teaching.

Completion of More Than One Credential

It is possible to earn more than one teaching credential while enrolled as a student at the University of the Pacific. For information about specific requirements and to plan an appropriate study that supports the earning of more than one credential, please see an advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Services for Out-of-State Teachers

Teachers who have been prepared in other states may apply directly to the Commission on Teacher Credentialing, 1900 Capitol Avenue, Sacramento, CA 95814-4213. Such teachers may enter Pacific for the purposes of earning a credential or satisfying selected requirements. A credential file should be opened, with the credential analyst being given copies of credential documents. Admission to Pacific’s Graduate School is also necessary. The School of Education recommends the appropriate credential when California requirements are met if the necessary study is completed at this institution. A fee of $30 is required to open a credential file.

Services for Prospective Transfer Students

Students who contemplate transferring to qualify for a teaching credential may write to the School of Education or phone (209) 946-2558 or 946-2685 to confer about course selection. They may also contact the University’s Office of Admissions for transfer admission requirements, (209) 946-2211. Graduating University seniors contact the Graduate School for information and application and confer with the School of Education. If the GPA for junior/senior years is above 3.0, they can inquire about the Master of Education degree which includes credential preparation. The GRE General Examination scores are required for application for the EdD and PhD degrees and advanced degrees in the Department of Educational and School Psychology.

Programs in English as a Second Language: Pedagogy Major for International Students

The School of Education offers an undergraduate program for International students who wish to become teachers of ESL (English as a Second Language) or EFL (English as a Foreign Language). At the undergraduate level, international students may choose the Pedagogy Major with a specialization in either Language and Culture or Second Language Pedagogy. (See description under Degrees in the School of Education for specific courses required for the Pedagogy Major.)

Programs to Earn Multiple Subject Credential

The courses and experiential learning opportunities for students seeking a multiple subject credential is included as a part of the Bachelor of Arts with Liberal Studies with credential program discussed below under “Undergraduate Degrees.” As noted, students also have the option of earning a credential through post-baccalaureate programs of study (credential only or MEd) These are discussed in the Graduate Catalog. Information about all programs is available in the Curriculum and Instruction office.

Programs to Earn Credentials to Teach Special Education

The courses and experiential learning opportunities for students who seek to become special education teachers (Educational Specialist-mild/moderate or moderate/severe Levels I/Preliminary and II/Clear) are discussed below under “Undergraduate Degrees.” As noted, students also have the option of earning a credential through post-baccalaureate programs of study (credential only or MEd) These are discussed in the Graduate Catalog. Information about all programs is available in the Curriculum and Instruction office.

Programs To Earn Single Subject Credential

Undergraduate students who seek to earn a single subject credential in one of the following areas: English, Art, Social Sciences, Sciences, Mathematics, Spanish, Music, and Physical Education consult with a faculty advisor in the appropriate academic department. Undergraduates can plan to earn a single subject credential concurrent with the bachelor's degree in selected content fields. The option of earning a credential through post-baccalaureate programs of study (credential only or MA or M. Ed) is available as well. Students should consult with a School of Education advisor for appropriate education courses.

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers a Preliminary Single Subject Credential Program that consists of the following:

I. Prerequisite courses:

EDUC 140Transformational Teaching and Learning4
EDUC 141Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum *2
EDUC 130Technology Enhanced Learning Environments2
*

EDUC 141 is not taken by Music Education students.

II. Professional Teacher Education Courses for the Single Subject Credential 

EDUC 155Teaching in the Content Areas I3
EDUC 156Content and Disciplinary Literacy Development in Secondary Schools3
EDUC 160Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Classrooms2
EDUC 163Teaching English Learners3-4
or EDUC 166 Teaching English Learners, Single Subject
EDUC 165Teaching in the Content Areas II2

The Single Subject Program in Music Education and Physical Education take methods courses in their content fields.

III. Directed Teaching: 12 units 

EDUC 170Professional Practice2-10
EDUC 172Professional Practice Seminar2-10

Normally, EDUC 170 and EDUC 172 total to 12 units.

Completion of the following course:

SPED 125XTeaching Exceptional Learners2

In addition to meeting degree requirements and completion the program outlines above, a student who seeks a Single Subject Preliminary Requirement must also:

  • Complete CBEST prior to Student Teaching or Internship
  • Pass the California Subject Exam For Teachers (CSET) for the specific subject matter field (see advisor for information regarding the required exams and the timeline for completion of this exam.) Music has the option of an approved subject matter program.
  • Complete the United States Constitution requirement
  • Pass all program requirements which includes maintaining a 2.5 GPA, advancing to Credential Candidacy, and meeting standards on all embedded signature assignments (implemented in the electronic portfolio on TaskStream)
  • Demonstrate his/her competence in relationship to thirteen Teaching Performance Expectations and through the completion of all requirements in the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT), the Teaching Performance Assessment
  • Demonstrate his/her competence in professional practice (student teaching/ internship) as assessed by University Supervisor and their cooperating teacher(s) in their student teaching and/or internship placement(s)
  • Complete an application for the SB 2042 Single Subject Preliminary Credential at the Office of the Credential Analyst
  • Complete CPR Certification Infant, Child and Adult level.

Under SB 2042 legislation, the holder of a Single Subject Preliminary Credential must complete requirements for a Clear Credential through a CTC-approved Induction Program provided by a school district or some California colleges or universities.

Advising materials for the Single Subject are available in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Room 102, School of Education Building. Students are required to meet with a department advisor for registration.

The credentials or licenses for teaching in California schools offered by the University include the Multiple Subject Credential, the Single Subject Credential, and the Educational Specialist Credentials, Mild/Moderate Disabilities or Moderate/Severe Disabilities, Preliminary- Level One and Clear- Level Two.

The Single Subject Credential authorizes its holder to teach that subject at any level between kindergarten and grade 12, though it is used typically in grades 7-12. The Multiple Subject Credential authorizes its holder to teach in any classroom in which the students remain with the teacher. The Multiple Subject Credential is required for teaching grades K through 6. Some districts require a Single Subject Credential for teaching one subject field in middle school or junior high school. The Multiple Subject Credential may be used for teaching upper grades in which students remain with the teacher in a self-contained classroom and for adult education.

Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree and who meet admissions criteria have the option to pursue their teaching credentials through a post-baccalaureate credential, MEd, MA, or internship programs. Details regarding these options are available in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Details regarding the MEd or MA program are also available in the Graduate Catalog.

Students who seek to earn a credential must complete an approved program of study and take and pass required state examinations. Specific information about the requirements for each program is available in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies Major Diversified Liberal Studies

Students must complete a minimum of 124 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts in liberal studies degree with a major in diversified. (Please note – a 2.5 GPA is required in all courses that lead to a teaching credential.)

The program of study includes the following:

I. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

II. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

III. Language, Literature, Communication

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
ENGL 025English 25 (Literature Analysis)4
EDUC 100Introduction to Language4
EDUC 131First and Second Language Acquisition/Linguistic Foundations4
COMM 143Intercultural Communication4

IV. History (World, United States, California)

HIST 020United States History I4
HIST 021United States History II4
HIST 130History of California4
Select one of the following:4
Western Civilization I
World History I

V. Mathematics (Two Courses)

MATH 161Elementary Concepts of Mathematics I4
Select one of the following:
Elementary Statistical Inference
Introduction to Statistics and Probability *
*

MATH 037 is for students with advanced mathematics abilities.


VI. Sciences

BIOL 041Introduction to Biology4
GESC 057Earth Systems Science4
PHYS 017Concepts of Physics4

VII. Visual and Performing Arts

EDUC 142Visual Arts in Education3
MEDU 100Music for Children3
THEA 011Introduction to the Theatre4

VIII. Physical Education and Child Development

PSYC 029Developmental Psychology4
HESP 151Elementary Physical Education3

IX. Senior Capstone Courses

PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

X. Concentration “Depth of Study” Courses

Three to four courses in one of the following recommended concentrations: 12

  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
  • Mathematics
  • Sciences
  • Special Education
  • Evening Program Concentration for EdPro2 students
  • Other areas: History and Social Sciences, Visual/Performing Arts, or Physical Education are available in consultation with an advisor in the Diversified Major.

Note: 1) These concentrations are described in advisement materials found in the Curriculum and Instruction Department, Room 102. 2) Students must complete successfully Pacific Seminar 3. 3) Courses in the major and in credentialing must be taken for a letter grade. 4) No more than eight units of extension coursework from Pacific may count towards the degree. 5) Limitations on ACTY courses also apply.

Note: Evening Degree (EdPro2) students are subject to complete a specialized concentration designed for their cohort group.

XI. Prerequisite Teacher Education Courses (Required for the Degree in the Traditional Degree Program)

EDUC 130Technology Enhanced Learning Environments2
EDUC 140Transformational Teaching and Learning4
EDUC 141Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum2

XII. Professional Teacher Preparation Courses – Multiple Subject (Required for a Preliminary Multiple Subject Credential)

EDUC 150Teaching and Assessment4
EDUC 153Teaching Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics4
EDUC 160Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Classrooms2-3
or SPED 195E Positive Behavioral Support in the Classroom
EDUC 161Literacy Development (Multiple Subject)4
EDUC 163Teaching English Learners4


XIII. Directed Teaching: 12 units

EDUC 170Professional Practice2-10
EDUC 172Professional Practice Seminar2-10
SPED 125XTeaching Exceptional Learners2


Note: Normally, EDUC 170 and EDUC 172 total 12 units.

In addition to meeting the above degree requirements, a student who seeks a Multiple Subject Preliminary Requirement must also:

  • Pass CBEST examination
  • Pass the California Subject Exam For Teachers (CSET-MS) prior to Student Teaching or Internship
  • Pass the Reading Instruction Competency Assessment (RICA) prior to applying for the credential
  • Pass all program requirements which includes maintaining a 2.5 GPA, credential candidacy, and meeting standards on all embedded signature assignments (implementation in the electronic portfolio on TaskStream)
  • Demonstrate his/her competence in relationship to thirteen Teaching Performance Expectations and through the completion of all requirements in the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT)
  • Demonstrate his/her competence in professional practice (student teaching/ internship) as assessed by University Supervisor and their cooperating teacher(s) in their student teaching and/or internship placement(s),
  • Completion of the United States Constitution requirement.
  • Completion of CPR Certification Infant, Child and Adult level.
  • Complete an application for the SB 2042 Multiple Subject Preliminary Credential at the Office of the Credential Analyst.

Under SB 2042 legislation, the holder of a Multiple Subject Preliminary Credential must complete requirements for a Multiple Subject Clear Credential through a CTC-approved Induction Program provided by a school district or some California colleges or universities.

Advising materials for the Diversified Major are available in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Room 102, School of Education Building. Students are required to meet with a department advisor for registration each semester as they progress through the degree program.

Course Requirements for the Pedagogy Major (for international students)

  1. University general education requirements with emphasis on selecting courses for intercultural understanding (30 units) must be completed. Only three general education courses may be taken on a pass/no credit basis, and not more than one course in each of the three main categories may be taken on a pass/no credit basis. Students must complete Pacific Seminars 1, 2 and 3 and two courses in each of the three main categories in general education. If a Pacific Seminar 1 or 2 course is waived, or not passed, a course from an appropriate category for general education is required.
  2. Development of proficiency in the English language through intensive English programs, as needed, to pass proficiency examinations (24 units or equivalent) is required.
  3. Professional education – A minimum of 24 units is required. The student’s advisor assists him/her to determine appropriate courses.
  4. Electives (3 units minimum) are completed from a list of courses available in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
  5. Concentration Area: Students complete a Concentration Area in one of the following options: (24 units)
    1. Second Language Pedagogy (for international students who are preparing to teach English as a foreign language): courses in language structure, language development and second language acquisition.
    2. Language and Culture Pedagogy (for international students who are preparing to teach the language and culture of the United States): courses in literature of the English language, expository writing, reading and English instructional techniques, and courses providing special understanding of American culture.
    3. Technical Pedagogy (for international students who are preparing to teach classes in technical subjects): courses selected from science, mathematics, computer subjects, engineering, health and physical education, educational technology and instructional methods.
    4. Special Education Pedagogy (for international students who are preparing to teach in a specialized learning field): teaching the physically and psychologically handicapped.
  6. Elective courses are completed to meet degree requirements of 124 units.
  7. A grade point average of 2.0 is maintained in all professional education and concentration area courses. None of the courses in these two areas is taken on a pass/no credit basis.

Undergraduate Preparation for a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies and a Level One Education Specialist Credential

Students in the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies program in the Benerd School of Education may pursue an Education Specialist Credential, Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe Disabilities, Level One and the Diversified-Liberal Studies Major. Students complete:

  • the Diversified-Liberal Studies Major described previously,
  • prerequisite courses in Teacher Education Program described above (these are listed later in this section),
  • the following courses in the Education Specialist Level One program:

I. Prerequisite Courses:

EDUC 130Technology Enhanced Learning Environments2
EDUC 140Transformational Teaching and Learning4
EDUC 141Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum2

II. Courses in the Diversified-Liberal Studies Major’s Concentration in Special Education:

SPED 123The Exceptional Child3
SPED 166Building Family-Professional Partnerships3
Select two of the following:
Assessment of Special Education Students
Advanced Programming for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
Advanced Programming for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities
Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities

III. Professional Methods Courses:

SPED 124Assessment of Special Education Students (already completed in the concentration) *3
Select one of the following:3
Advanced Programming for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
Advanced Programming for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities
Select one of the following:3
Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (already completed in the concentration) *
Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities
SPED 131Evidence Based Practices in Autism Spectrum Disorder3
SPED 195EPositive Behavioral Support in the Classroom3
EDUC 150Teaching and Assessment4
EDUC 161Literacy Development (Multiple Subject)4
EDUC 163Teaching English Learners3-4
or EDUC 166 Teaching English Learners, Single Subject
*

Units taken in the concentration also fulfill credential course requirements. Units count only once.


IV. Directed Teaching

SPED 198M or SPED 198S Directed Teaching: M or S Mild/Moderate Or Moderate/Severe

In addition to meeting the above degree requirements, a student who seeks an Educational Specialist Level I credential must also:

  • Pass the Reading Instruction Competency Assessment (RICA) (see advisor for the timeline for completion of this exam.)
  • Pass other mandated exams: CBEST and CSET (see advisor for details and the timeline.)
  • Completion of the United States Constitution requirement
  • Pass all program requirements which includes maintaining a 2.5 GPA, credential candidacy, meeting standards on all embedded signature assignments (implementation in the electronic portfolio on TaskStream)
  • Demonstrate his/her competence in relationship to Education Specialist competencies and completion of a portfolio and all requirements in the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT), when implemented for the Education Specialist credential(s)
  • Demonstrate his/her competence in professional practice (student teaching/ internship) as assessed by University Supervisor and their cooperating teacher(s) in their student teaching and/or internship placement(s)
  • Completion of CPR Certification Infant, Child and Adult level
  • Complete an application for the Education Specialist Level I/Preliminary Credential at the Office of the Credential Analyst.

The holder of a Educational Specialist Level I/Preliminary Credential must complete requirements for a Level II/Clear Credential through a CTC-approved Level II Clear Program provided by California colleges or universities or district programs.

Advising materials for the Educational Specialist Credential programs are available in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Room 102, School of Education Building. Students must meet with a department advisor for registration each semester.

Prerequisite courses in Special Education:

SPED 123The Exceptional Child3
SPED 166Building Family-Professional Partnerships3

Teacher Education Prerequisite Courses:

EDUC 130Technology Enhanced Learning Environments2
EDUC 140Transformational Teaching and Learning4
EDUC 141Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum2

Professional Methods Courses:

Students must complete Advancement to Teacher Education (Credential Candidacy) steps as described in the Multiple Subject description in this Catalog to enroll in the following courses:

EDUC 150/250Teaching and Assessment4
EDUC 161/261Literacy Development (Multiple Subject)4
EDUC 163/263Teaching English Learners3-4
or EDUC 166 Teaching English Learners, Single Subject
SPED 124/224Assessment of Special Education Students3
Select one of the following:3
Advanced Programming for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
Advanced Programming for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities
Select one of the following:3
Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities
SPED 131/231Evidence Based Practices in Autism Spectrum Disorder3
SPED 195E/295EPositive Behavioral Support in the Classroom3


Subject matter competence (CSET) may be met with successful completion of the Diversified major or a Single Subject subject matter program or the state-approved examination(s) for the Multiple or Single Subject-subject matter content areas. State requirements for subject matter competence are subject to change. Federal, state, and school district requirements may designate subject matter examinations for level of teaching placement.

Approval for Special Education Directed Teaching:

Prior to admission to Directed Teaching, students must attend a meeting that the Coordinator of Special Education and the Director of Field Experiences hold to inform students about application procedures for student teaching or internship placements (STAR review). GPA requirements and minimum grade requirements in teacher preparation courses are reviewed and must be completed. The CBEST examination must be passed and subject matter requirements for the credential must be completed. CPR for infant, child, and adult certification is required for a credential. Students will not be allowed to register for Directed Teaching if the CBEST and successful passage of the CSET examination(s) for the Multiple Subject credential, are not met. A subject matter program or passage of examinations for a Single Subject content area is allowed for the Education Specialist Credential. Students must also complete the United States Constitution requirement (See the Multiple Subject section in the Catalog.) Most school districts may require passage of the CSET-Multiple Subjects examination for employment. Single Subject examinations may also be required for employment.

Directed Teaching

SPED 198MDirected Teaching: Mild/Moderate1-10
SPED 198SDirected Teaching: Moderate/Severe1-10

Internship is an option for Directed Teaching for the Education Specialist Credentials. A student must have a bachelor’s degree and meet all program requirements for an Internship. See the Internship section in the Catalog for requirements for Internship.

Students must complete competencies for the Education Specialist Program, pass the RICA examination, complete a professional portfolio and program and state assessments, and satisfy all program requirements for a recommendation for the Level One Credential. CPR Certification for infant, child, and adult level is required.

Minor in Teaching Professions

The Teaching Professions Minor offers undergraduates interested in pursuing a career in education a cohesive set of courses that provides them with the foundation for teaching in a variety of settings and/or pursuing related careers while continuing to build strong subject matter knowledge in their majors. The minor lays the groundwork for graduation with either a bachelor's degree with a single subject (secondary) preliminary teaching credential or preparation for a post baccalaureate credential. Students consider how humans learn as well as the social, psychological, economic, historical, political, cultural factors that influence teaching and learning in public schools.

Students must complete a minimum of 22 units with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the minor in teaching professions.

Minor Requirements

EDUC 130Technology Enhanced Learning Environments2
EDUC 140Transformational Teaching and Learning4
EDUC 141Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum2
EDUC 155Teaching in the Content Areas I3
EDUC 156Content and Disciplinary Literacy Development in Secondary Schools3
EDUC 160Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Classrooms2
EDUC 163Teaching English Learners4
or EDUC 166 Teaching English Learners, Single Subject
EDUC 167Adolescent Development3

Education Courses

EDUC 010. Dean's Seminar. 1 Unit.

A basic introduction to the career of teaching and the programs and methodologies of the School of Education including educational requirements, professional orientation, career opportunities and school and university regulations.

EDUC 011. Children's Literature. 3 Units.

Students examine various genres of quality literature for children from preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is on how books affect the growing child and on ways to develop children’s appreciation and comprehension of stories as well as to extend their subject matter knowledge.

EDUC 100. Introduction to Language. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the central role of language in cultures and societies. Emphasis is on social and regional language variation, language and prejudice, gender and social class differences in conversation styles, the history and evolution of languages, and societal attitudes toward language and socio-political-economic influences on language use. Students gain more precision in their academic language development as they explore English grammatical structures and develop an appreciation of the work sociolinguists do through conversational analysis. As part of the University of the Pacific's general education program (1-A), this is a library intensive course. This means that students do library research, using online and other sources to meet some of the course requirements. (GE1A)

EDUC 129. Seminar: Cultural Basis of Conflict in Education. 3 Units.

Analysis of cultural diversity in American classrooms. Not open to doctoral students. (ETHC)

EDUC 130. Technology Enhanced Learning Environments. 2 Units.

This course focuses on basic skills and software for creating multimedia projects, completing assignments in all education courses, and meeting the state’s technology standards for teachers. All assignments in this course relate to building the structure and first section of a candidate’s teacher education electronic portfolio. Thereafter, candidates add sections to the portfolio during other courses and activities in their programs of study, which includes evidence that they have met the state’s technology standards. Upon graduation, the portfolios are archived in the BSE, and candidates can create a DVD of their entire portfolio or of parts they wish to use. This course is a prerequisite to Admission to Teacher Education.

EDUC 131. First and Second Language Acquisition/Linguistic Foundations. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to first and second language development, using a compare and contrast framework. It covers theoretical perspectives in first and second language acquisition and explores the relationship between theories and practice in language learning and teaching. This course addresses pedagogical implications of various theories of second language acquisition and discusses socio-cultural factors that influence second language learning. In addition, there is particular attention given to language structure (phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax) as it relates to the language development of native speakers of English as well as English language learners. This course includes a fieldwork component for which students work with young elementary students off campus once a week during the semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 100.

EDUC 140. Transformational Teaching and Learning. 4 Units.

This is an introductory course that explores the complex relationships within and among local, state, and national levels of public instruction. The course introduces historical, legal, and social issues that affect diverse educational settings. Topics include key movements and legal cases of prominence in American education; demographic information about learners and schools in California; home, family and school partnerships; and professional stages in teaching careers (e.g., subject matter preparation, teacher education, initial licensure, induction programs, and professional development). The course also includes an introduction to “reflective practice”; an overview of stages in human development; prominent learning and motivation theories; the characteristics of learners with exceptional needs; and individual differences among learners, which include English language learners. This course is taken by students interested in Multiple Subject, Single Subject and/or Educational Specialist credentials. It is a prerequisite to Admission to Teacher Education, but it is open to all students at the University. Fieldwork requires fingerprint review and clearance at local districts and TB clearance. There are fees for these services.

EDUC 141. Transformational Teaching and Learning Practicum. 2 Units.

This supervised practicum is taken concurrently with EDUC 140: Transformational Teaching and Learning. Students examine the community, school, and classroom contexts and how they influence the teaching and learning process. Translation of current learning theories into practice are analyzed and applied. Students interact with K – 12 students and teachers in public school settings.

EDUC 142. Visual Arts in Education. 3 Units.

This course assists students in developing an understanding of the visual arts and how they interface with children’s development through age 18. The course acquaints students with Visual Arts curriculum in the K-12 classroom. A philosophical emphasis is be placed upon the interface of visual arts with children’s development. The course explores such concepts and processes as aesthetic perception, creative expression, visual arts heritage and aesthetic valuing, and media and materials, suitable for children through age 18. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (GE2C)

EDUC 150. Teaching and Assessment. 4 Units.

This course supports reflective teaching and learner-centered principles and practices in the K-12 schools. The course focuses on state-adopted curriculum standards and frameworks in seven content fields, particularly on the content area of History/Social Science; approaches to classroom management; selection of curriculum materials at the state level; and evaluation. Topics include implementing appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of students with special needs and culturally diverse learners; and using developmentally appropriate diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments to plan instruction. Technology is used to enhance curriculum design and student interaction with content knowledge. This course is taken concurrently with EDUC 153, Teaching STEM, for Multiple Subject candidates. EDUC 150 is taken by Education Specialist candidates. (EDUC 153 is not taken by Special Education candidates, unless they are planning to earn a Multiple Subject Credential.) Prerequisite: EDUC 140. Fingerprint and TB test clearance is required.

EDUC 153. Teaching Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. 4 Units.

Methods and curriculum presented for teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics in self-contained classrooms. Topics include state-apopted content standards and curriculum framework; essential mathematics, technology, engineering, life, physical, and earth science themes, concepts, and skills; instructional planning and diverse and appropriate teaching strategies for meeting the needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; needs of diverse learners, including mainstreamed and culturally diverse learners; principles and practices of evaluation of students' learning. Fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 140.

EDUC 154. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Secondary Classrooms. 2 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Prerquisites: Instructor approval or C & I department permission; minimum 2.5 GPA, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 155. Teaching in the Content Areas I. 3 Units.

This is the first of a three-part course for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. Candidates learn and apply current learning theories to planning, instruction, and assessment, focusing on the general knowledge, skills, and dispositions associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. Candidates begin to learn about specific subject matter content and pedagogy and a variety of instructional and assessment strategies to benefit all learners. The needs of all secondary school students, including English Learners, and characteristics of the school environment are emphasized for fostering effective teaching and learning.

EDUC 156. Content and Disciplinary Literacy Development in Secondary Schools. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to research-based content literacy instruction. The course focuses on preparing candidates to teach content-based reading and writing skills to a full range of students which includes struggling readers, students with special needs, and English Learners. A variety of content-based literacy strategies (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) is presented to facilitate learning in the content areas. The course meets credential requirements. Prerequisites: EDUC 140, admission to Creditial Candidacy, Instructor/Curriculum and Instruction department permission, fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 157. TESOL Theory and Practice. 4 Units.

This course provides a link between theory and practice in the teaching of ESL. Aspects of language learning is discussed, and concomitant instruction and curriculum is analyzed while developing a working model for the development of curriculum that is appropriate for the teaching situation.

EDUC 160. Productive Learning Environments for Diverse Classrooms. 2 Units.

Core course concepts and activities include using culturally responsive techniques that contribute to productive learning environments and equitable student outcomes. Preservice teachers in this course survey current discipline and management models and practice research-based strategies designed to promote positive classroom behavior. Establishing and maintaining relationships with families, students, and colleagues are explored as well as practices that contribute to teacher well-being and self-care. Senior standing or permission of instructor.

EDUC 161. Literacy Development (Multiple Subject). 4 Units.

This course introduces methods and curriculum for teaching reading and language arts with integration of humanities and social science for students from kindergarten to eighth grade classrooms. The course focuses on theory-based effective instruction of reading, writing, listening and speaking across the curriculum. Students learn to analyze and evaluate effective literacy skills and strategies in teaching reading, writing, listening and speaking to K-8 students, and to apply and practice these skills and strategies in various instructional settings in various content areas. Emphasis is placed on the integration of reading and language arts throughout the curriculum. Twenty-four hours of fieldwork is required. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching (Professional Practice).Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education program with fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 162. Literacy Assessment (Multiple Subject). 2 Units.

This course investigates the uses of ongoing instructional diagnostic strategies in reading and language arts that guide teaching and assessment. Topics include early intervention techniques appropriate for a classroom setting and guided practice of these techniques. Fieldwork is required and shared with EDUC 161. This course is taken prior to Directed Teaching and may be taken with EDUC 161 concurrently. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education with fingerprint and TB test clearance.

EDUC 163. Teaching English Learners. 4 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English profeciency in K-8 classrooms. Teachers will develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to both the California english Language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these strategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objectives include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series fieldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequiesites: EDUC 100, 140, and 150, or instructor/C & I department permission; minimum GPA of 2.5; Finerprint and TB test clearance. (ETHC)

EDUC 164. Introduction to Bilingual Education. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of bilingual education and is designed to meet the needs of both undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in understanding the role of bilingual, bicultural education in schools. Students explore the related implications of second language acquisition research, sociopolitical theory, and historical as well as contemporary experiences in the contexts of program design, instructional practice, and school/community relations toward a conceptualization of bilingual education as a source of pedagogical enrichment strategies for all learners in all settings. Prerequisites: EDUC 100 and EDUC 131. (ETHC)

EDUC 165. Teaching in the Content Areas II. 2 Units.

This is the second of a multi-course series for Single Subject credential candidates to develop professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms, especially in secondary schools. The emphasis in this course is on content-specific practices. Candidates join their respective professional organizations and participate in those organizations’ professional development experiences. In addition to whole class meetings, candidates meet in content-specific seminars with practitioners in their content areas on a regular basis.

EDUC 166. Teaching English Learners, Single Subject. 3 Units.

This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers with the theory, principles, knowledge, and skills to effectively understand and teach English Language Learners at a variety of levels of English proficiency in K-12 classrooms. Teahcers develop appropriate strategies and approaches for developing language proficiency and link their practice to the California English language Development Standards and the new Common Core State Standards. Students observe and implement these stategies during their field experiences in order to see, practice, and reflect on effective ways to meet the needs of English learners. Objective include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Fieldwork hours (160 series feldwork) specific to this class are required. A grade of C or higher is required for passing this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 140 or instructor/C & I department permission; minimium 2.5 GPA; Fingerprint and TB test clearance. (ETHC)

EDUC 167. Adolescent Development. 3 Units.

This course is designed for secondary preservice teachers to consider the principles of adolescent development in context. Biological, cognitive, psychological, social, and moral development are examined to determine how these developmental pathways affect student achievement, motivation, and well being. The influence of family, peers, school, and the broader community on development are explored as well. Implications of current understandings of adolescent development on teaching, learning, and assessment are emphasized. In addition to class meetings, students participate in a practicum in order to apply learning in school settings.

EDUC 168. Microcomputers in Education. 3 Units.

This course introduces the student to the major concepts and applications related to the use of microcomputers in education. Students learn basic operations, terminology and capabilities of microcomputers within an educational context. Key issues related to the use of instructional technology are discussed. Application and evaluation of software for classroom instruction and management is investigated.

EDUC 169. Microcomputers and Curriculum Design. 3 Units.

Issues related to the educational application of instructional technology and its impact on education is investigated. Students do in-depth analyses of software applications and their validity in relation to learning models and the current curriculum. Students evaluate how new technologies may effect change in curriculum. Various projects that relate to evaluation of software, teaching strategies and research in new technologies are required. Prerequisite: EDUC 168 or permission of instructor.

EDUC 170. Professional Practice. 2-10 Units.

Professional practice is a full-day of Student Teaching in public schools. Candidates for a Single Subject and Multiple Subject Preliminary teaching credential are placed in local public schools for intensive application of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for professional practice in California schools. Student Teaching is full-day teaching for a semester, and undergraduates are approved for Student Teaching. Prerequisites: EDUC 130, EDUC 140, EDUC 141, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDUC 152, EDUC 161, EDUC 162, EDUC 163, EDUC172 (concurrently); SPED 125X (concurrently) with grades of “C” or higher; a minimum GPA of 2.5.; admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; a passing score on the CBEST with subject matter completed (CSET examination or approved subject matter/waiver program) and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance with TB test clearance and program assessments completed prior to Directed Teaching; Directed Teaching approval process must be completed with clearance by the Director of Field Experiences; The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework is permitted other than SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops. A candidate must petition for permission to take an additional course in advance with the Curriculum and Instruction Department’s Director of Field Experiences.

EDUC 171. Professional Practice Music. 2-10 Units.

This course is a full-day of Student Teaching in public schools. Candidates for a Single Subject Music Preliminary teaching credential are placed in local public schools for intensive application of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for professional practice in California schools. Student Teaching is full-day teaching for a semester, and undergraduates may be approved for Student Teaching. Prerequisites are EDUC 130, EDUC 140, EDUC 141, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDUC 152, EDUC 161, EDUC 162, EDUC 163, EDUC 171 (concurrently); SPED 125X (concurrently) with grades of “C” or higher; a minimum GPA of 2.5; admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy; a passing score on the CBEST with subject matter completed (CSET examination or approved subject matter/waiver program) and approved; approval of a Certificate of Clearance with TB test clearance program assessments completed prior to Directed Teaching; completed Directed Teaching approval process with clearance by the Director of Field Experiences; The United States Constitution requirement must be completed to apply for a teaching credential. No other coursework is permitted other than EDUC 172 and SPED 125X and weekend and vacation workshops. A candidate must petition for permission to take an additional course in advance with the Curriculum and Instruction Department’s Director of Field Experiences.

EDUC 172. Professional Practice Seminar. 2-10 Units.

Students reflect upon and integrate the Directed Teaching experience in large and small group settings for the SB 2042 Credential. Topics include multicultural education, child abuse, school law, interpreting standardized test scores, professional associations and negotiations, discipline plans, lesson planning and conferencing skills. This course may be taken concurrently with EDUC 170/EDUC 270.

EDUC 175. Teaching in the Content Areas III. 2 Units.

This course is the culminating part of a three-part course for Single Subject credential candidates that develops professional, reflective practices and abilities for teaching in single subject classrooms schools. It is taken concurrently with the professional practice practicum (student teaching). Emphasis in the first two parts of the course is placed on acquiring and practicing general and content-specific knowledge, skills, and ethical values associated with managing contemporary, culturally diverse secondary classroom environments. The course is co-taught by University faculty and K-12 Content Area Specialists. In the third and final portion of the course, candidates integrate and synthesize prior learning and independently teach grades 7 – 12 students in their professional practice placements. University and Grades 7 – 12 Content Area Specialists supervise and support candidates and continue to lead seminar sessions. The capstone assessment that leads to the Level I teaching credential, the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) Teaching Event (TE) is completed as part of this course.

EDUC 180. Workshop Learning: Issues Group Leadership. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to support the learning and leadership model, Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL). The course topics include practical information (understanding motivation, managing time, dealing with dominating students, learning styles, group dynamics, study skills, helping students improve critical thinking, develop logical reasoning, and prepare for tests), a foundation in learning theory, and guidance about the specific components of the workshop lessons.

EDUC 181. ECE: Social Justice/Diversity. 3 Units.

This course is conducted as an undergraduate level seminar that is designed to examine key normative issues in the area of social justice, diversity and multiculturalism with an emphasis in early childhood education. The relation of social diversity (race, ethnicity, gender, language, societal attitudes and class) to equality in education and education reform movements is viewed from multiple contexts. Topics explored are diversity, sociopolitical aspects of history and the impact on education, and specifically, early childhood education and multiculturalism. A practicum is required in this course. (ETHC)

EDUC 182. ECE: Curriculum and Inquiry. 3 Units.

This course is an upper division course that examines the theoretical understandings of curriculum and inquiry in the early childhood development classroom. Students refine their knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to early childhood methodology and application to young children in diverse populations.

EDUC 183. ECE: Social Contexts/Cognitive Development. 3 Units.

This course is conducted as an undergraduate level seminar that is designed to clarify the cognitive, philosophical, historical, psychological, cultural, social and ethical foundations of early childhood education. The nature of theory and practice are important to teachers of young children and this course provides a broad synthesis of knowledge of child development principles to better understand how children think, act, and how to be effective with them in the classroom.

EDUC 189. Practicum. 2-4 Units.

EDUC 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 192. Preliminary Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192A. Elementary Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192B. Secondary Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Consent of department chair.

EDUC 192D. Early Childhood Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192E. Reading Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192F. Bilingual Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 192G. Cross-cultural Education Fieldwork. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair.

EDUC 195A. Pedagogical Seminar. 3 Units.

Investigation of the role that subject matter knowledge and its representations play in teaching. Emphasis on self-assessment of subject matter knowledge. Focus on moral and ethical dimensions of teaching and learning. Prequisite: completion of a minimum of 8 units in a concentration for the diversified major or multiple subjects wavier program. Senior status or second semester junior status required. Permission of department chair.

EDUC 197. Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

EDUC 197D. Research in Education. 1-4 Units.

Educational Psychology Courses

EPSY 121X. Learner-Centered Concerns. 3 Units.

This course is a general overview of stages in human development from birth to young adulthood. Topics include prominent learning and motivation theories, learner-centered principles of teaching and assessment, the characteristics of learners with exceptional needs, and individual differences among learners including English language learners. Students who are interested in Multiple Subject, Single Subject and/or Educational Specialist credentials take this course.Twenty hours of fieldwork in K-12 public schools is required. Open to all students. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education; fingerprint review and clearance at local districts; TB test clearance (there is a fee for these services).

EPSY 191. Independent Study. 1-3 Units.

Permission of department chair is required.

Special Education Courses

SPED 123. The Exceptional Child. 3 Units.

Description of the characteristics and needs of children and youth with disablilities. Exploration of the etiology, treatment, educational strategies, social and vocational opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Ten hours of field experience will be required as part of the course content. This course satisfies the requirements for clearing a preliminary multiple and single subject credential as specified by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. (CTCC).

SPED 124. Assessment of Special Education Students. 3 Units.

The role of assessment in teaching students with disabilities will be explored. In addition, teacher made testx, curriculum based assessment, portfolio assessment, and commonly used standardized tests will be examined. This course will comply with the California Commisson on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for The Preliminary Level One Credential for Education Specialist: Mild/Moderate/Severe Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166. Admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 125X. Teaching Exceptional Learners. 2 Units.

This method-based course is for candidates who will be teaching students with disabilities in the general education classroom, and it includes techniques and strategies for individualizing specific student needs. The course content reviews special education law and the inclusive schools movement. Taken concurrently with Directed Teaching. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education (Credential Candidacy). Fingerprint and TB test clearance.

SPED 128M. Advanced Programming for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities. 3 Units.

Theoretical and applied information that pertains to the characteristics and educational needs of students with mild to moderate disabilities is presented. The course complies with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for the Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 128S. Advanced Programming for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities. 3 Units.

This course presents theoretical and applied information that pertains to specialized health care and sensory needs as well as educational characteristics for students with moderate/severe disabilities. This course complies with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for the Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational specialist: Moderate/Severe Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 131. Evidence Based Practices in Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Units.

Focused study on the autistic spectrum disorder through examination of research studies and applied information on effective program development. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics and educational needs of children and adults who are diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Further, students will demonstrate knowledge of evidenced based behavioral, educational and social strategies, and family impact and dynamics. Students will also demonstrate the ability to synthesize information and communicate effectively with parents, teachers, administrators, and care-givers. The course is designed for new or current professionals in education, school psychology, administration, and related helping professions. This course is a required course for all candidates for the Education Specialist credential in mild/moderate and moderate/severe disabilities.

SPED 132. Juvenile Bipolar Disorder. 3 Units.

The course will examine the diagnostic process, including the challenges of juvenile on-set bipolar disorder where presentation of the disorder is frequently confused with other conditions. Cutting edge treatment/management approaches will be examined in an integrated manner, including family dynamics, medication, and psycho-social methods. A particular emphasis will be placed on psycho-educational assessment, the role of each member of the educational team, melding appropriate educational and behavioral program development, and tools for working successfully with school programs.

SPED 142M. Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities. 3 Units.

This course presents theoretical and applied information that pertains to methods of curriculum and instruction for students with mild to moderate disabilities. This course complies with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for The Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational Specialist: Mild/Moderate Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 142S. Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities. 3 Units.

This course presents theoretical and applied information that pertains to methods of curriculum and instruction for students with moderate to severe disabilities. This course complies with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for the Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational Specialist: Moderate/Severe Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 166. Building Family-Professional Partnerships. 3 Units.

This course provides practical strategies for professional educators to effectively communicate and collaborate with families in order to enhance the capacity of families to support an advocate for children with special needs in the home, school, and community. The emotional and social needs of children with disabilities and their families, education laws and policies regarding parental/family rights, historical and current trends in family advocacy, and professional ethics are also be examined. Ten hours of field experience is required as part of the course content.

SPED 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Permission of department chair is required.

SPED 195E. Positive Behavioral Support in the Classroom. 3 Units.

Theoretical and applied information that pertains to methods of providing positive behavioral support to students with and without disabilities in educational settings are examined. This course complies with the requirements for the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) Preliminary Level One Credential for Educational Specialist: Mild/Moderate/Severe Disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 123 and SPED 166 with admission to Teacher Education/Credential Candidacy or permission of Special Education Coordinator or Department Chair of Curriculum and Instruction.

SPED 198M. Directed Teaching: Mild/Moderate. 1-10 Units.

This student teaching experience provides an opportunity for candidates in the mild/moderate credential program to apply theoretical knowledge and acquired skills to the classroom in a student teaching experience. Prerequisites: the completion of all prerequisite and required courses needed to enroll in Directed Teaching and permission of the Director of Special Education or designate.

SPED 198S. Directed Teaching: Moderate/Severe. 1-10 Units.

This student teaching experience provides an opportunity for candidates in the moderate/severe credential program to apply theoretical knowledge and acquired skills to the classroom in a student teaching experience. Prerequisites are the completion of all prerequisite and required courses needed to enroll in Directed Teaching and permission of the Director of Special Education or designate.

Gladys L. Benerd School of Education Faculty

Vanessa Sheared, Dean, 2016, BA, Wheaton College, 1977; MA, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 1980; EdD, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, IL, 1992.

Marilyn E. Draheim, Assistant Dean and Associate Professor of Education, 1986, BA, Luther College, 1972; MA, University of Iowa, 1974; EdS, 1974; PhD, University of California, Berkeley, 1986.

Rod Patrick Githens, Assistant Dean and Associate Professor, 2015, BS, Lincoln Christian College, 1999; BS, Illinois State University, 1999; EdM, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004; PhD, 2008.

Linda Webster, Assistant Dean and Professor of Education, 1996, BA, California State University, Fresno, 1981; MA, University of California, Berkeley, 1984; PhD, 1988.

Teresa Vail, Director of Field Experiences, Assistant Professor, 2013, BA, California State University at Sacramento, 1994; M.S., University of the Pacific, 2007; Ed.D., 2011.

Ruth V. Brittin, Professor of Music Education, 1998, PhD, Florida State University, 1989.

Rhonda Bryant, Associate Professor, 2015, BA, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1985; MEd, 1987; PhD, 2000.

Kellie Cain, Assistant Professor, 2002, BA, University of California, Davis, 1987; MA, University of the Pacific, 1999; EdD, 2005.

Rachelle Hackett, Associate Professor of Education, 1994, BA, California State University, Fresno, 1982; MS, Stanford University, 1986; PhD, 1994.

Ronald Hallett, Associate Professor, 2009, BA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 1999; MA, The George Washington University, 2003; PhD, University of Southern California, 2009.

Joel Lohr, Associate Professor, 2014, BA, Trinity Western University, Langley, British Columbia, Canada, 2002; MA, University of Durham, England, 2003; PhD, 2007.

Justin Low, Assistant Professor, 2010, BA, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 2003; MA, The University of Texas at Austin, 2008; PhD, 2010.

Delores E. McNair, Associate Professor, 2006, BA, Holy Names College, 1988; MPA, University of Southern California, 1988; EdD, Oregon State University, 2002.

Elaine Mo, Assistant Professor, 2011, BA, University of California, Los Angeles, 1994; EdM, Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2003; EdD, 2010.

Thomas G. Nelson, Associate Professor of Education, 1995, BA, California State University, Northridge, 1975; MA, California State University, Sacramento, 1988; PhD, University of Arizona, 1993.

Robert Oprandy, Professor of Education, 2002, BA, Rutgers University, 1969; MA, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1977; MEd, 1979; EdD, 1988.

Gregory R. Potter, Assistant Professor of Education, 2002, AB, University of California, Davis, 1992; MS, 1996; PhD, 2000.

Christina Rusk, Assistant Professor, 2014, BA, St. Ambrose University, Davenport, 2000; BEd, 2000; MS, Ft. Hays University, 2010.

Amy Scott, Associate Professor, 2007, BA, University of California, Berkeley, 2000; MA, Arizona State University, Tempe, 2002; PhD, 2006.

Antonio Serna, Assistant Professor, 2006, BA, California State University, Fresno, 1974; MA, Stanford University, 1978; EdD University of the Pacific, 1990.

Linda Skrla, Professor, 2012, BBA, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, 1979; MEd, 1991; PhD, The University of Texas at Austin, 1997.

Vernon Smith, Assistant Professor, 2016, BA, Brigham Young University, 1988; MOB, 1990: PhD, University of Arizona, 2008.

Heidi J. Stevenson, Associate Professor of Education, 2004, BA, University of California, Davis, 1995; MA, Chapman University, 2001; EdD, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2004.