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Eberhardt School Of Business

http://www.business.pacific.edu
Phone: (209) 946-2476
Location: Weber Hall

David Dauwalder, Interim Dean
Cynthia Firey Eakin, Associate Dean for Academic Programs

Undergraduate Degree Programs Offered

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

  • Accounting
  • Arts & Entertainment Management
  • Business Law
  • Economics
  • Entrepreneurial Management
  • Finance
  • International Business
  • Management and Human Resources
  • Management Information Systems
  • Marketing

Bachelor of Science in Accounting

Bachelor of Science in Accounting/Master of Accounting Blended Program

Minors Offered

Business Administration
Management
Management Information Systems

Graduate Degree Programs Offered

(see Graduate Catalog for information)

Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Master of Accounting (MAcc)
Bachelor of Science in Accounting/Master of Accounting Blended Program
JD/MBA
PharmD/MBA
Peace Corps MBA

A professional school offering graduate and undergraduate programs providing the educational breadth and depth for tomorrow’s leaders of business, government, and not-for-profit organizations.

Mission

The Eberhardt School of Business develops knowledgeable, innovative business leaders in a personalized, experience-based learning environment and produces scholarship that contributes to disciplinary knowledge, informs teaching, and advances the practice of business. We share a set of underlying principles that govern our behaviors and our ability to achieve our mission. These include:

  • Maintaining a student-centered learning environment
  • Educating the whole person
  • Stimulating intellectual growth
  • Maintaining a mutually supportive community of faculty, staff and students
  • Engaging external stakeholders
  • Promoting excellence
  • Being socially responsible
  • Behaving ethically and with integrity
  • Providing service to the university, community and profession

Degree programs offered by the Eberhardt School of Business are designed to fulfill this mission and to provide the educational breadth and depth tomorrow’s leaders will need.

The Eberhardt School of Business was established in 1977 to fulfill the need for small, high quality management programs that could nurture the personal, professional and overall intellectual growth and development of talented men and women. The school currently has 25 full-time faculty and an enrollment of over 600 graduate and undergraduate students.

Small classes and excellent instructional facilities reinforce a highly personalized learning environment that encourages one-on-one interactions between students and faculty. Faculty and administrators are committed to making teaching the most important activity in the School. Outside the classroom, students choose from a wide variety of activities, including internships, student clubs and student government to further develop their leadership skills. The success of this approach to business and management education is reflected in the excellent job placement record of graduates.

For most business students, a major objective of their college education is to prepare for a successful career. Surveys of successful executives suggest that in order to meet the challenges and opportunities of the future, tomorrow’s managers need a broad-based education that combines the acquisition of business skills in such areas as accounting, marketing, finance, and management, with a solid foundation in mathematics, language and the arts and sciences. In particular, business leaders emphasize the importance of acquiring interpersonal skills, especially the ability to communicate effectively. The academic programs of the Eberhardt School of Business have been designed to address these objectives.

Accreditation

The Eberhardt School of Business is accredited in business by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

General Academic Regulations for BS in Business Administration

Graduation Requirements

  1. Students must fulfill the ESB minimum residency requirement of at least 32 units taken in the School.
  2. There is a limit on extension course credits for courses offered through the Center for Professional and Continuing Education. The total ceiling on such units is six, with a limit of 3 in any one semester.
  3. All prerequisites must be met before students enroll in any course.
  4. Except for BUSI 107, students who take any course numbered above BUSI 100 must have junior class standing (56 units).
  5. A student must receive a grade of “C” or better in any core course which is a prerequisite before taking a related concentration course.

Grading Policies

All courses required of all business administration majors must be taken for letter grade. ESB courses taken beyond those noted above may be taken on a P/NC basis, subject to the instructor’s approval. The freshman level Deans’ Seminar and junior level Career Development Seminar is offered P/NC only.

Students who receive a “P” in required courses that are taken before becoming a major in the ESB must petition to the Academic Standards Committee for these courses to be applied toward graduation requirements.

Scholastic Actions - Probation and Disqualification

  1. If a student has a balance point deficiency up to -8 in the major or -10 in the University GPA, he or she is on probation.
  2. If a student has a balance point deficiency larger than -8 in the major and/or -10 in the University GPA, he or she is subject to disqualification. Disqualification decisions are usually made at the end of the Spring semester, but a student who begins the Fall semester already on probation with a balance point deficiency of -8 or -10 or more may be disqualified at the end of the Fall semester if still at -8 or -10 or more at the end of that semester.
  3. Any student who is on probation for three consecutive semesters is subject to disqualification.

Deficiency points are a measure of how many credit points a student with a GPA below 2.0 needs to earn to raise his or her GPA to a 2.0. Deficiency points are removed by earning more points than the minimum needed to achieve a term GPA of 2.00. Grades of "C" earn 2.00 points, thus, to reduce or remove deficiency points, students must earn grades higher than a "C."  Further clarification of these (or other) policies may be obtained from the Eberhardt School of Business Student Services Office.

Transfer Students

Transfer courses must have a credit value of at least three semester units if they are to be applied to general education or major requirements. Courses from institutions on the quarter system must have a credit value of at least four quarter-units to be applied to the above categories.

Junior or community college students who plan to complete upper-division work in business at University of the Pacific complete one year of introductory economics, one year of introductory accounting, a semester each of calculus and statistics, and a semester of business law. Students also complete courses in expository writing, computer science, public speaking and the humanities. It is strongly advised that students who do plan to transfer contact the Eberhardt School of Business with specific questions regarding transfer credit.

Admissions Information

Additional information and specific admissions requirements is found in the section of this catalog entitled Admission Requirements or by contacting the Associate Dean for Academic Programs.

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

Students must complete a minimum of 128 units with a Pacific cumulative and school/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of science in business administration degree.

I. General Education Requirements (for students starting as Freshmen):

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3


Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from IC and IIIC.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course (Transfers only)

 
Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Pre-professional Skills Requirements

Advanced Writing
Select one of the following:4
Business Communications
English 25 *
Public Speaking
COMM 027Public Speaking *3
Mathematics
MATH 045Introduction to Finite Mathematics and Calculus *4
MATH 037Introduction to Statistics and Probability4
Computer Literacy
COMP 025Computers and Information Processing *4
Economics
ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics *4
ECON 055Introductory Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy *4
*

These courses are also part of the Pacific General Education Program, and can be counted toward the University General Education requirements.

V. Major Core Courses

BUSI 010Dean's Seminar1
BUSI 031Principles of Financial Accounting4
BUSI 033Principles of Managerial Accounting4
BUSI 053The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business4
BUSI 100Management Information Systems4
BUSI 104Operations Management4
BUSI 105Financial Management4
BUSI 107Marketing Management4
BUSI 109Management and Organizational Behavior4
BUSI 110Career and Development Seminar1
BUSI 181Strategic Management and Policy4

VI. Concentrations

Complete one of the following concentrations:

Note: 1) A student is required to take at least four concentration courses, one of which must be an international concentration course. 2) A number of concentrations require more than four courses.

Core Area Concentrations

Accounting
BUSI 113AIntermediate Accounting I4
BUSI 113BIntermediate Accounting II4
Select one of the following:4
International Financial Management
International Commercial Law
Select two of the following:8
Advanced Accounting
Tax Accounting
Cost Accounting
Auditing
Economics
ECON 101Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis4
ECON 190Econometrics4
Select two ECON Electives (courses above 100)8
Select one of the following:4
International Trade
International Finance
Economic Development
Finance
BUSI 121Financial Markets4
BUSI 123Investment Analysis4
BUSI 125Intermediate Financial Management4
BUSI 163International Financial Management4
International Business **
INTL 077Contemporary World Issues4
INTL 081Perspectives on World History4
INTL 151Cross-Cultural Training I2
INTL 161Cross-Cultural Training II2
Select one of the following groups:9-12
Group A
International Financial Management
Plus two upper division finance concentration courses
Group B
International Marketing
Plus two upper division marketing concentration courses
Group C
International Management
Plus two upper division management concentration courses
Group D
International Commercial Law
Plus two upper division law concentration courses
One additional international BUSI course4
Marketing
BUSI 141Marketing Research4
BUSI 165International Marketing4
Select two of the following:8
Personal Selling and Sales Management
Product Innovation
Consumer Behavior
Promotions Management
Strategic Marketing
Management Information Systems **
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to Computer Science
Business Programming
BUSI 137Database Management Systems4
BUSI 138Networking and Telecommunications Management4
BUSI 139Electronic Commerce Project4
Select one of the following:4
International Financial Management
International Marketing
International Management
International Commercial Law
Management and Human Resources
BUSI 169International Management4
BUSI 170Human Resources Management4
Select two of the following:8
Conflict Management
Employment Law
Creating Effective Work Teams
Leadership and Change
*

Each student who concentrates in international business is required  to complete one year of a foreign language or to show competency as determined by the Modern Languages department.  Each student also is required to study abroad for one semester.  The study abroad term can be during the fall, spring, or summer semesters. International students may choose to go abroad but are not required to go abroad. International students may not spend their study abroad term in their home country.

**

MIS students are strongly encouraged to purchase an up-to-date laptop computer for use in MIS classes.

Specialty Area Concentrations

Students may also develop concentrations in a number of specialty areas, each of which focus on a particular industry or very focused career track. The following is a listing of the requirements for concentrations in several specialty areas.

Specialty concentrations are subject to the availability of the courses listed. Some of these courses may not be offered every year. Additional specializations not listed below are also possible and can be self-designed by a student with the approval of his or her faculty advisor and the Associate Dean’s Office.

Entrepreneurial Management
BUSI 090Introduction to Entrepreneurship4
BUSI 173Entrepreneurial Management Practicum4
Select two of the following:8
Entrepreneurial Finance
Conflict Management
Human Resources Management
Leadership and Change
Marketing Research
Product Innovation
Engineering and Science-Based Entrepreneurship
Select one of the following:4
International Financial Management
International Marketing
International Management
International Commercial Law
Business Law
BUSI 157Commercial Law4
BUSI 178International Commercial Law4
Select two of the following:8
Tax Accounting
Legal Aspects of Real Estate
Entertainment Law
Employment Law
Arts and Entertainment Management
MMGT 011Music, Entertainment in U.S. Society4
MMGT 111Music Industry Analysis4
MMGT 153Entertainment Law (cross listed as BUSI 153)4
Three Business concentration courses, one of which must be:12
International Financial Management
International Marketing
International Management
International Commercial Law
Select one of the following:4
Music Appreciation *
Music of the World's People *
Introduction to Jazz *
*

These courses count toward general education requirements.

Bachelor of Science in Accounting

Students must complete a minimum of 128 units with a Pacific cumulative and school/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of science in accounting degree.

I. General Education Requirements (for students starting as Freshmen):


Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from IC and IIIC.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course (Transfers only)

 
Note:
1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Pre-professional Skills Requirements

Advanced Writing
Select one of the following:4
Business Communications
English 25 *
Public Speaking
COMM 027Public Speaking *3
Mathematics
MATH 045Introduction to Finite Mathematics and Calculus *4
MATH 037Introduction to Statistics and Probability4
Computer Literacy
COMP 025Computers and Information Processing *4
Economics
ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics *4
ECON 055Introductory Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy *4

V. Major Core Courses

BUSI 010Dean's Seminar1
BUSI 031Principles of Financial Accounting4
BUSI 033Principles of Managerial Accounting4
BUSI 053The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business4
BUSI 100Management Information Systems4
BUSI 104Operations Management4
BUSI 105Financial Management4
BUSI 107Marketing Management4
BUSI 109Management and Organizational Behavior4
BUSI 110Career and Development Seminar1
BUSI 181Strategic Management and Policy4

VI. Accounting Requirements

BUSI 113AIntermediate Accounting I4
BUSI 113BIntermediate Accounting II4
BUSI 113CAdvanced Accounting4
BUSI 115Tax Accounting4
BUSI 117Cost Accounting4
BUSI 119Auditing4
BUSI 157Commercial Law4
BUSI 125Intermediate Financial Management4

Bachelor of Science in Accounting/Master of Accounting Blended Program

Students must complete a minimum of 150 units with a Pacific cumulative and school/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of science in accounting degree and a 3.0 in the master of accounting degree.

I. General Education Requirements (for students starting as Freshmen):


Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from IC and IIIC.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course (Transfers only)

 
Note:
1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)


Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Pre-professional Skills Requirements

Advanced Writing
Select one of the following:4
Business Communications
English 25 *
Public Speaking
COMM 027Public Speaking *3
Mathematics
MATH 045Introduction to Finite Mathematics and Calculus *4
MATH 037Introduction to Statistics and Probability4
Computer Literacy
COMP 025Computers and Information Processing *4
Economics
ECON 053Introductory Microeconomics *4
ECON 055Introductory Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy *4
*

These courses are also part of the Pacific General Education Program, and can be counted toward the University General Education requirements.

V. Core Requirements

BUSI 010Dean's Seminar1
BUSI 031Principles of Financial Accounting4
BUSI 033Principles of Managerial Accounting4
BUSI 053The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business4
BUSI 100Management Information Systems4
BUSI 105Financial Management4
BUSI 107Marketing Management4
BUSI 109Management and Organizational Behavior4
BUSI 110Career and Development Seminar1


Note: 1) BUSI 274 below is substituted for BUSI 104. 2) BUSI 281 below is substituted for BUSI 181. 3) BUSI 218 below is substituted for BUSI 113C.

 
VI. Accounting Requirements

BUSI 113AIntermediate Accounting I4
BUSI 113BIntermediate Accounting II4
BUSI 115Tax Accounting4
BUSI 117Cost Accounting4
BUSI 119Auditing4
BUSI 125Intermediate Financial Management4
BUSI 157Commercial Law4

 
VII. Master of Accounting Requirements

A minimum of 30 graduate units with a Pacific grade point average of 3.0 is required.  All courses must be completed with a C (2.0) or higher.

BUSI 213Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility3
BUSI 214Negotiation2
BUSI 215Taxation of Business Entities3
BUSI 216Professional Accounting Research2
BUSI 217Ethics for Professional Accountants3
BUSI 218Advanced Financial Accounting Graduate Level3
BUSI 219Graduate Auditing Seminar3
BUSI 226Financial Statement Analysis3
BUSI 274Managing Quality/Productivity3
BUSI 279Leadership2
BUSI 281Strategic Management3

Minor in Management

The minor in management provides an exposure to general management principles and some functional area technical skills for students majoring in disciplines outside of the Eberhardt School of Business. The minor is not intended as a substitute for the broad in-depth coverage found in the business degree.

Students must complete a minimum of 20 units with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in management.  All courses in minor must be taken at Pacific.

Minor Requirements

BUSI 031Principles of Financial Accounting4
BUSI 109Management and Organizational Behavior4
Three BUSI Electives Courses Offered by the School of Business (excluding BUSI 010, BUSI 023, BUSI 110, and most BUSI 191 and BUSI 193)12

 

Minor in Business Administration

The minor in business administration covers a wide range of the basic principles used in business administration and is intended for non-business majors. The minor is not a substitute for the broad in-depth coverage found in the business degree.

Students must complete a minimum of 24 units with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in business administration.  All courses in minor must be taken at Pacific.

Minor Requirements

BUSI 031Principles of Financial Accounting4
Select four of the following:
Principles of Managerial Accounting
The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business
Financial Management
Marketing Management
Management and Organizational Behavior
One BUSI Electives Course Offered by the School of Business (excluding BUSI 010, BUSI 023, BUSI 110 and most BUSI 191 and BUSI 193)4

 

Minor in Business Information Systems

The minor in business information systems provides a basic knowledge in business information systems and is intended for non-business majors. The minor is not a substitute for the broad in-depth coverage found in the business degree.

Students must complete a minimum of 24 units with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in business information systems.  All courses in minor must be taken at Pacific.

Minor Requirements

COMP 025Computers and Information Processing4
COMP 051Introduction to Computer Science4
BUSI 100Management Information Systems4
Three of the following courses:12
Database Management Systems
Networking and Telecommunications Management
Electronic Commerce Project
Business Systems Analysis


Note: 1) All courses are taken for a letter grade at the Eberhardt School of Business. 2) Students who minor must fulfill all prerequisites and junior class standing requirements for ESB courses. 3) Students must exercise caution to not violate the University’s restriction which allows only 30 units of BUSI courses that can be credited toward the degree requirements of non-business majors.

Business Administration Courses

BUSI 010. Dean's Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is a general survey of the programs and methodologies of the Eberhardt School of Business that include, but not limited to educational requirements, professional orientation, career opportunities and School and University regulations. It is required of all ESB freshmen. (Grading is P/NC only).

BUSI 023. Business Communications. 4 Units.

This course develops the written and oral communication skills necessary to succeed in a business environment. Using a suitable writing style, students prepare the types of documents commonplace in business organizations, such as business letters, reports, interoffice memoranda, sales proposals, and business plans. Students apply their understanding of word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software to communicate business data and information. Prerequisite: COMP 025.

BUSI 031. Principles of Financial Accounting. 4 Units.

Students analyze the recording and reporting of business transactions, use of financial statements, and the use of accounting information in management decision-making. (PLAW)

BUSI 033. Principles of Managerial Accounting. 4 Units.

Students use and analyze accounting information management decision-making in planning, production, evaluation and control decisions. Prerequisite: BUSI 031.

BUSI 053. The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to law as related to court systems and jurisdiction, litigation and other methods of resolving disputes, ethical decision-making, the Constitution and business, lawmaking and regulation by administrative agencies, international law, business organizations, antitrust law, consumer protection, employment law, contract law, and product liability. (GE1B, PLAW)

BUSI 090. Introduction to Entrepreneurship. 4 Units.

This course provides students with an introduction to entrepreneurship and the contexts in which it applies. First, it introduces students to the nature of entrepreneurship and its role and effects on markets and societies. Next, it offers an overview of the entrepreneurial process, from the initial stages of opportunity recognition and assessment to growth and exits. Finally, it explores the many organizational contexts in which entrepreneurship is applicable, including startups, large corporations, social ventures, cultural and academic institutions, and the public sector. Prerequisites: BUSI 010. Sophomore standing.

BUSI 100. Management Information Systems. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the concepts and skills needed to utilize information systems resources. The course focuses on the role of information systems in management function with an emphasis on end-user computing, that includes the role of users in information system planning and design. Topics include information systems technology, applications and development. Students gain experience with spreadsheet, data base and network applications. Prerequisite: COMP 025 or COMP 051.

BUSI 104. Operations Management. 4 Units.

Students analyze the production and operations systems in the organization and application of quantitative methods in solution of production and operations problems. A major emphasis is on managerial and economic implications. Prerequisites: BUSI 031, BUSI 033, ECON 053, ECON 055, MATH 037, MATH 045 and an acceptable computer course. Junior standing.

BUSI 105. Financial Management. 4 Units.

This course introduces financial instruments and institutions from the perspective of the financial management of the firm. Tools of financial analysis and planning as well as principles of sehor-term and long-term financing are developed as they relate to profit-ability and liquidity. Prerequisites: BUSI 031, ECON 053, ECON 055, MATH 037, MATH 045. Junior standing.

BUSI 107. Marketing Management. 4 Units.

BUSI 107 is an introduction to the institutions, techniques, policies and procedures utilized in the planning and performance of the activities which direct the flow of goods and services from producers to consumers. An emphasis is placed on the managerial process of decision-making in the setting of marketing strategy. Prerequisite: ECON 053. Sophomore standing.

BUSI 109. Management and Organizational Behavior. 4 Units.

BUSI 109 applies the concepts of organizational behavior and structure theories to the managerial processes, and emphasizes how organizational efficiency and effectiveness are developed. Junior standing.

BUSI 110. Career and Development Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to enable business students to clearly define their career objectives and available opportunities. Through the course business students understand the connection between internships and full-time careers, are trained in the methods of conducting a successful job search and prepare for on-going career development. Topics include career assessment, resumes and related correspondence, interviewing, career planning, and job search resources. The course also discusses opportunities available in graduate studies. Junior standing.

BUSI 111. Accounting Information Systems. 4 Units.

The course emphasizes the use of accounting software and the interaction of accountants with information systems. It also covers assessment of internal and computer controls in order to identify key risks within accounting cycles, and it reviews the latest computer architectures used in ERP. Prerequisites: BUSI 033 and BUSI 100. Junior standing.

BUSI 112. Computer Skills for Accountants. 1 Unit.

This course is a hands-on laboratory course that continues the study of spreadsheet applications and other accounting software programs, with an emphasis on projects especially important to accountants. This course emphasizes the more advanced accounting situations that spreadsheet applications and other programs make easier. Prerequisites: COMP 025, BUSI 031, BUSI 033, BUSI 100 with a "C" or better. Co-requisite: BUSI 111.

BUSI 113A. Intermediate Accounting I. 4 Units.

Students study the income measurement and asset valuation under generally accepted accounting principles. The course emphasizes current procedures, form and content of financial statements and critical evaluation of alternative accounting practices. Prerequisite: BUSI 031 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 113B. Intermediate Accounting II. 4 Units.

Students continue to study generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include owners' equity, dilutive securities, pensions, leases, income taxes, statement of cash flows and inflation accounting. Prerequisite: BUSI 113A with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 113C. Advanced Accounting. 4 Units.

Students study advanced accounting theory and practice that includes accounting for inter-corperate investments, partnerships, foreign currency transactions, government and nonprofit organizations and current topics. Prerequisite: BUSI 113B with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 115. Tax Accounting. 4 Units.

Students study federal tax laws and doctrines that significantly affect businesses, property transactions, and individuals. Tax planning techniques and tax research skills are emphasized. Prerequisites: BUSI 031 and BUSI 033 both with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 117. Cost Accounting. 4 Units.

This course emphasizes skills used by management accountants or other decision makers within an organization for planning and control. Topics include analysis of cost structures, profit planning, product cost systems, cost estimation, budgeting, and the behavioral implications of management accounting systems. Prerequisites: BUSI 031 and BUSI 033 both with a "C" or better; MATH 037. Junior standing.

BUSI 119. Auditing. 4 Units.

This capstone course in accounting studies the integration of financial and management accounting systems. Topics include the attest function and ethics, generally accepted auditing standards, systems of internal control, evidence and audit reports. Prerequisite: BUSI 113A with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 121. Financial Markets. 4 Units.

Students examine the monetary transmission mechanism with emphasis on its implications for financial management of the individual firm. Topics include the institutions of money and credit creation, the flow-of-funds accounts and financial market subsection interconnection. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 122. Student Investment Fund (SIF). 4 Units.

Operated entirely by students, this course allows students to gain hands-on, real world experience in managing an investment fund with substantial market value. Students perform sector analyses as well as financial analyses of a wide array of securities. As a group they determine the fund's sector allocation and stock/bond/cash allocation. SIF, while maintaining a well-diversified profile, strives to outperform the market (S&P 500). Prerequisites: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better and permission of instructor. Junior standing. May be taken twice for credit.

BUSI 123. Investment Analysis. 4 Units.

Students examine the nature of securities markets and the characteristics of various types of securities for institutional and personal investment. Sources of investment information, security valuation and investment planning are introduced. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 124. Entrepreneurial Finance. 4 Units.

Entrepreneurial Finance discusses the financial issues facing a business start-up and those of a growing enterprise. Specific attention is paid to the acquisition of financing for new ventures, financial management of new and growing businesses, and the harvest of the entrepreneurial venture. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 125. Intermediate Financial Management. 4 Units.

This is a second course in business finance with emphasis on problem solving. Selected problems in the management of long-term and short-term assets are examined in depth and techniques for optimizing the goals of the firm are developed. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 126. Topics in Finance. 4 Units.

This course is an in-depth examination of special topics of current interest in the field of finance. Students and faculty together explore empirical and theoretical issues in such areas of finance as investment analysis, financial management, financial markets and other related areas. Prerequisites: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better and BUSI 121. Junior standing.

BUSI 127. Legal Aspects of Real Estate. 4 Units.

Students study the legal aspects that concern real estate and real estate transactions. Topics include deeds, listing agreements, title insurance, real estate contracts, closing, property taxation, land use regulations and landlord-tenent relationships. Prerequisite: BUSI 053. Junior standing. (PLAW)

BUSI 134. Conflict Management. 4 Units.

Conflict is inevitable in organizational, inter-organizational and international settings. This course deals with conflict in concept and in practice and is designed to provide insights into its causes and its productive and destructive consequences. It also focuses on providing tools for managing conflict productively, and particularly emphasizes negotiation. Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 136. Business Programming. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to programming logic and design. Visual Basic is used to emphasize the development of business applications. Students also study Windows design elements, forms, and events. Junior standing.

BUSI 137. Database Management Systems. 4 Units.

Students learn to develop database management systems to design and build business applications. The course teaches database design (normalization), queries (SQL), development of business applications that use forms and reports, and an introduction to database administration. Prerequisite: BUSI 100 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 138. Networking and Telecommunications Management. 4 Units.

Students examine design, implementation, and management of local area networks. Studies include design issues in wide area networks and telecommunications with emphasis on Internet connectivity in addition to network server setup and administration that includes Web site administration. Prerequisite: BUSI 100 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 139. Electronic Commerce Project. 4 Units.

Students design and build applications for electronic commerce. Students use databases and programming to build interactive Web sites. Prerequisite: BUSI 100 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 140. Business Systems Analysis. 4 Units.

Students study systems development life cycle, methods and tools for systems analysis and design, human factors, user interface, and systems integration issues. Prerequisite: BUSI 136. Junior standing.

BUSI 141. Marketing Research. 4 Units.

Students study the concepts and techniques useful in the solution of marketing problems and in the identification of marketing opportunities. This course emphasizes the design of information acquisition and the evaluation and interpretation of research findings. Prerequisites: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better and MATH 037. Junior standing.

BUSI 142. Personal Selling and Sales Management. 4 Units.

Personal Selling and Sales Management examines the sales function from strategic competitive importance to the firm to required direct sales skills of individual salesperson. Major subject areas covered are: the sales process, recruitment and training, organization and focus, “territories”, evaluation and compensation. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a “C” or better.

BUSI 143. Product Innovation. 4 Units.

Maintaining competitiveness in the contemporary marketplace requires that companies focus increasingly on the management of product and service innovation. This course addresses the innovation process-technology-based and otherwise-from the identification of new ideas through the development of innovations and eventual introduction of novel products to consumers. Topics include sources of innovation, identification and screening of product innovations, business planning for new products, technological forecasting, integrating innovation with business objectives and organizational models for fostering innovation. Prerequisites: BUSI 107 and BUSI 141 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 147. Consumer Behavior. 4 Units.

Students study the bases for consumer behavior, which include relevant information from social psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology. Topics include the application of analysis of consumers' behavior and attitudes to marketing management decisions. Management decision areas that are discussed include advertising, product development, marketing research and pricing. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 148. Promotions Management. 4 Units.

Students study the theory and practices used in the promotions component of the marketing mix. Students are exposed to a number of techniques employed by marketing departments, advertising firms and public relations professionals to advertise and promote products and or services. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 149. Strategic Marketing. 4 Units.

Students are introduced to the strategic marketing process, that includes the analysis of marketing situations, identification of problems, determination of solutions, implementation of corrective action, and planning strategy. Prerequisites: BUSI 105 and BUSI 141 both with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 153. Entertainment Law. 4 Units.

Students study all aspects of the legal relationships and rights problems in films, television, music and records. This course is also offered as MMGT 153. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 157. Commercial Law. 4 Units.

Students study the basic principles of commercial and trade law and business organizations that include agency partnerships and corporations. The course covers contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code, real and personal property, securities regulation, secured transactions, bankruptcy, professional liability and negotiable instruments. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing. (PLAW)

BUSI 159. Employment Law. 4 Units.

This course examines major labor-management relations legislation and its interpretation and treatment by administrative agencies and the courts. Primary emphasis is on the National Labor Relations Act as amended, but attention is also given to law concerning public sector labor relations, employment discrimination and other related law. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing. (PLAW)

BUSI 163. International Financial Management. 4 Units.

This course is an analysis of management problems that arise in an international financial environment. Specific consideration is given to financial risk (s), management and international financial markets. Prerequisite: BUSI 105 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 165. International Marketing. 4 Units.

Students examine the environment for marketing across borders. The course covers marketing practice, policies and strategies in the multinational setting. Students complete a global screening of countries and draw up a marketing plan and strategy for a given product. Prerequisite: BUSI 107 with a "C" or better. Junior standing. (ETHC)

BUSI 169. International Management. 4 Units.

Develops cross-cultural awareness through understanding of social, political, economical, and historical influences on managerial practice. Methods include lectures, readings, videos, role-plays, and reports (written and oral). Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 170. Human Resources Management. 4 Units.

This course introduces the P/HR management area with its core of activities that include job analysis, performance evaluation, employee acquisition, employee and management development, and compensation and benefits. The influences of the equal employment and civil rights laws, wage, and hour laws, labor law and labor unions in organizational operations are studied. Prerequisite, may be taken concurrently: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing. (DVSY)

BUSI 172. Entrepreneurship. 4 Units.

This course covers the new creation process from the venture idea phase to the capital search and acquisition, through the new venture start-up and operations. Theories and techniques are applied to the planning and development of an actual new enterprise. New ventures include the traditional small business or a high growth venture, or the formation of a new business entity or a new venture within an existing organization. Prerequisites: BUSI 031, BUSI 033, BUSI 107 all with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 173. Entrepreneurial Management Practicum. 4 Units.

This course serves as the capstone in the Entrepreneurial Management concentration. Students will integrate what they’ve learned in the program and apply it to a major project under the guidance of the instructor. Project can include business plan development for the student’s own idea or experiential consulting project for a company, nonprofit, or agency that involves some aspect of new business development. Prerequisites: BUSI 031, BUSI 090. Junior standing.

BUSI 174. Creating Effective Work Teams. 4 Units.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with an understanding of work team dynamics that enable them to develop skills to participate in and lead teams in the workplace. Because the focus is on teams, the course takes a "learning by doing" approach and involves numerous group activities designed to reinforce the material. Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 175. Leadership and Change. 4 Units.

Students examine the processes of deliberate organizational change as adaptations to both internal and external developments. The course covers criteria for effective change programs, strategic variables that affect change (e.g., power, communication, conflict), and technologies that produce change (e.g., consulting, training, research). Prerequisite: BUSI 109 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 176. Managing Small Businesses. 4 Units.

The focus of the course is on the decisions owner-managers make in choosing opportunities, allocating resourses, motivating employees and maintaining control while not stifling entrepreneurial activities that cause a business to grow. Topics include managing under adversity, management of the family business, professionalizing the growing business, corporate entrepreneurship, financial planning, control, accountability and the changing role of the board of directors. A field study and a research paper that involves the applications of the concepts in a specific firm are required. Prerequisites: BUSI 031 and BUSI 109 both with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 177. International Trade Law. 4 Units.

International Trade Law provides students with the opportunity to study legal aspects associated with international trade agreements. The primary emphasis of the course is on the global trading system as represented by the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and the World Trade Organization and regional trading systems such as the European Union and the North American Free Trade Agreement. The course also examines agreements ancillary to these trading regimes as well as relevant national laws. The emphasis of the course will be on the recognition of legal problems and the discovery and application of appropriate principles of international and domestic law that may assist in resolving these problems. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 178. International Commercial Law. 4 Units.

International Commercial Law provides students with the opportunity to study the law that governs international contracts. The course examines ethical considerations in international contracting, commercial dispute resolutions, and import and export transactions. Several different types of contracts are examined including those that relate to the sale of goods, services, transportation, insurance and intellectual property rights. The emphasis of the course is on the recognition of legal problems and the discovery and application of appropriate principles of international and domestic law that may assist in resolving these problems. Prerequisite: BUSI 053 with a "C" or better. Junior standing.

BUSI 181. Strategic Management and Policy. 4 Units.

This course is an integrated analysis of the major functional areas of an enterprise, viewed primarily from the upper levels of management. The strategic management process provides the framework that formulates and implements objectives, policies and programs through which a company gains sustainable competencies and competitive advantage in the marketplace. Students participate in computer simulations, case analysis, and experimental exercises in order to develop skills in executive teamwork, to solve strategic problems and to present and defend recommendations. Prerequisites: BUSI 031, BUSI 033, BUSI 053, BUSI 100, BUSI 104, BUSI 105, BUSI 107, BUSI 109.

BUSI 183. Administrative Internship. 1-8 Units.

The internship affords students the opportunity to combine administrative practice and classroom theory. Interns are placed with private, public or third sector agencies for a period of at least 40 hours per earned credit hour. In addition, the supervising instructor assigns academic work to complement the hands-on portion of the internship. Interested students contact the ESB Career Services Office or the office of the Associate Dean located in Weber Hall.

BUSI 186. Firm, Markets, and Environment: Theory and Application. 3 Units.

This course provides in-depth exposure to both the theory of the firm and a set of quantitative techniques that managers need to utilize in order to facilitate decision making and problem solving. The topics include demand theory and estimation, forecasting with econometric and time-series techniques, production and cost theory, theory of markets, capital budgeting, fiscal and monetary policy, and the global economic and financial environment. Prerequisites: ECON 053, ECON 055, and permission of the MBA Program Director. Senior standing.

BUSI 188. Data and Decisions. 3 Units.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and techniques that analyze risk and formulate sound decisions in uncertain environments. The course examines statistical methods which interpret and analyze data that include sampling concepts, regression analysis, and hypothesis testing. Applications include investor management, portfolio analysis, quality control and inventory management, portfolio analysis, quality control and inventory management. This course emphasizes analytical techniques that are broadly applicable to business problems. Prerequisites: MATH 037, MATH 045 and permission of the MBA Program Director. Senior standing.

BUSI 191. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

This course is primarily for advanced majors in business administration. An independent study proposal is submitted to and is approved by the student's faculty adviser, the instructor and the ESB Academic Standards Committee. Independent study is self-directed study by the student.

Learning Outcomes

1. Demonstrate knowledge of business principles, concepts, theories, and perspectives for each business discipline. The business disciplines include Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing, Operations Management, Management Information Systems, and the Legal and Ethical Environment of Business.
2. Demonstrate skills in the use of business procedures, methods, strategies, and approaches for each business discipline.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships among business disciplines.
4. Identify problems and make recommendations based on an analysis of the information provided.
5. Recognize the ethical dimensions of business decisions.
6. Recognize cross-cultural components of business decisions.
7. Work effectively with others as a member of a team.
8. Demonstrate effective oral communication skills.
9. Demonstrate effective written communication skills.

Eberhardt School Of Business Faculty

David Dauwaldeer, Interim Dean, 2017

Cynthia Eakin, Associate Dean for Academic Programs, Associate Professor of Accounting, 1996, BS, 1986; MAcc, 1988; Ph.D., 1993, The Florida State University.

Ed Arnheiter, Assistant Professor of Management, 2016, Ph.D, 1997, MS, 1994 University of Massachusetts Amherst; BS Union College, 1983.

Thomas E. Brierton, Associate Professor of Business Law, 1989, BBA, University of Wisconsin, 1978; JD, Northern Illinois University, College of Law, 1983.

Benjamin Carlston, Assistant Professor of Finance, 2013, BA, Brigham young University, 2007, MA, 2008, Ph.D., 2013, Duke University.

Janice Y.S. Chen, Assistant Professor of Accounting, 2013, BA, 1999, MS, 2001 National Chengchi University, Ph.D., 2013, Temple University.

Julia Dare, Assistant Professor of Management, 2012, BBA, Southern Methodist University, 1992; MBA, Wharton School of Business, 1996; PhD, University of Southern California, 2011.

Vusal Eminli, Assistant Professor of Finance, 2013, BA, Berea College, 2008 MS, 2010, Ph.D., 2013, Purdue University.

Sally A. Hamilton, Instructor of Accounting, 2016, Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1987; MBA, University of San Diego, 1983; BA University of California at Davis, 1979.

Joel Herche, Associate Professor of Marketing, 1994, BA, Central Washington University, 1979; MBA, Golden Gate University, 1986; PhD, University of Oregon, 1989.

Peter E. Hilsenrath, Professor of Management, 2009, BA, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1978; PhD, University of Texas, Austin, 1985.

Hsinchih Huang, Professor of Management Information Systems, 1998, BS, National Chiao-Tung University (Taiwan), 1986; MBA, Rochester Institute of Technology, 1990; PhD, University of North Texas, 1996.

Leili Javadpour, Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems, 2016, Ph.D, Louisiana State University, 2013; MS, University of Liverpool, 2009; BS, Isfahan University of Technology, 2007.

Sacha M. Joseph, Associate Professor of Marketing, 2006, BA, University of the West Indies (Jamaica), 1998; MS, Florida State University, 2004; PhD, Florida State University, 2006.

Unro Lee, Professor of Finance, 1990, BA, University of Southern California, 1977; MA, Indiana University, 1981; PhD, Purdue University, 1986.

Laurie Lichter-Heath, Instructor of Business Law, 2007, LLM, Georgetown University Law Center; JD, The John Marshall Law School; BS, The University of Tennessee.

Ruonan Liu, Assistant Professor of Accounting, 2014, Ph.D, Florida International University, 2014; MS, State University of New York at Binghampton, 2010;VS, Shandong Economic University, 2007.

Jeffrey A. Miles, Professor of Management, 1990, BA, Ohio State University, 1984; M.P.S., Cornell University, 1986; MLHR, Ohio State University, 1992; PhD, 1993.

Stefanie E. Naumann, Professor of Management, 1999, BS, Tulane University, 1993; PhD, Lousiana State,1998.

Wenjing Ouyang, Assistant Professor of Finance, 2012, BS, Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade, 2001; MS, Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade, 2004; PhD, Drexel University, 2012.

Cecilia Ruvalcaba, Assistant Professor of Marketing, 2015, BS De Vry University, 2003, MBA Loyola Marymount University, 2006, Ph.D. University of California at Irvine, 2015

Chris Sablynski, Associate Professor of Management, 2009, BS, University of Florida, 1986; MS, San Francisco State University, 1996; PhD, University of Washington, 2002.

Dara M. Szyliowicz, Associate Professor of Management, 2006, BA, Columbia University, 1988; MA, University of California, Berkeley, 1990; PhD, University of Illinois, 1998.

Eric W. Typpo, Associate Professor of Accounting, 1998, BS, University of Missouri, 1986; MA, 1990; PhD, Florida State University, 1994.

R. Daniel Wadhwani, Associate Professor of Management, 2006, BA, Yale University, 1991; PhD, University of Pennsylvania, 2003.

Suzanne B. Walchli, Associate Professor of Marketing, 2000, BA, Duke University, 1975; MBA, Wharton Graduate Division, University of Pennsylvania, 1978; PhD, Northwestern University, 1996.

James C. Webb., Assistant Professor of Accounting, 2014, BA 2002, MPA, The University of Texas - Austin, 2002, M. Div., Asbury Theological Seminary, 2008, Ph.D, The University of Michigan, 2014.