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Visual Arts

http://www.pacific.edu/Academics/Schools-and-Colleges/College-of-the-Pacific/Academics/Departments-and-Programs/Visual-Arts.html
Phone: (209) 946-2241
Location: Jeannette Powell Art Center, South Campus

Jennifer Little, Chair

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Fine Arts

Majors Offered

Art (BA)
Graphic Design (BFA)
Media X (BA)
Studio Art (BFA)

Minors Offered

Art History
Graphic Design
Studio Art

Mission

Our mission is to provide aspiring artists and graphic designers with intensive, integrative, relevant, and rewarding educational programs of excellent quality in a personal, supportive, and collaborative environment. We seek to graduate creative individuals who think critically and historically, communicate effectively, and act responsibly in our global society. We are also committed to providing studio and art history courses to non-art majors as part of Pacific's General Education Program and to contributing to the aesthetic quality of the campus.

To accomplish this mission:

  • Our undergraduate curricula include art and design theories, histories, and experiential learning in both traditional and contemporary visual arts media, providing a strong basis for informed reflection, critical thinking, independent inquiry, and imaginative expression.
  • Our undergraduate curricula in Graphic Design and Studio Art combine a thorough visual arts education with a comprehensive grounding in the fertile, intellectual heritage of the Humanities and the liberal arts.
  • Our faculty members inform and inspire; their teaching expertise is enriched by their professional experience as artists, designers, and historians.
  • Undergraduate research, internships, and study abroad experiences are encouraged.
  • We promote interdisciplinary partnerships and collaborations with other units within the university and within our community to create educational opportunities and reach to broader audiences.
  • We engage in ongoing assessment of our programs.

Degrees in Studio Art and Graphic Design

The department offers two accredited degree programs. These programs lead to a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Graphic Design or Studio Art. A self-designed major in Art History is available (e.g. Visual Studies, Arts Administration, Art Therapy). Admission into the BFA degree programs requires filing a declaration of major form and consulting with a department advisor in the chosen discipline.

Bachelor of Arts Major in Art

Students must complete a minimum of 124 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree with a major in art.

I. General Education Requirements

Minimum 42 units and 12 courses that include:

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from below in place of taking PACS 001 and PACS 002.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)

Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

IV. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

V. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 64 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Course includes general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

VI. Major Requirements

Minimum 59 units that include:

ARTH 007Survey of World Art to 14004
ARTH 009Survey of World Art After 14004
ARTH 116Contemporary World Art 1945 to Present4
ARTS 005Drawing3
ARTS 007Principles of 2-D Design and Color3
ARTS 009Principles of 3-D Design3
ARTS 011Digital Photography3
ARTS 023Painting I3
ARTS 037Sculpture3
ARTS 059Printmaking I3
ARTS 073Freshman Seminar1
ARTS 095Video I3
ARTS 105Time Based Media: Web Design3
ARTS 183Professional Practices in the Arts3
ARTS 185Studio Art Seminar III4
Select two of the following concentrations: (Only one required if Visual Arts Teaching Credential is chosen)
A) Drawing
ARTS 021Life Drawing I3
Select one of the following:3
Life Drawing II
Illustration
B) Painting
ARTS 123Painting II3
Select one of the following:3
Watercolor Painting
Illustration
C) Photography
ARTS 141Photography II3
D) Printmaking
ARTS 151Printmaking II3
E) Three Dimensional Media
ARTS 1333-D Studio I3
F) Visual Arts Teaching Credential
ARTS 021Life Drawing I3
EDUC 142Visual Arts in Education3
Select one of the following:3
Watercolor Painting
Painting II
Select one of the following:3
Photography II
Printmaking II

Bachelor of Fine Arts Major in Studio Art

Students must complete a minimum of 127 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of fine arts degree with a major in studio art.

I. General Education Requirements

Minimum 42 units and 12 courses that include:

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from below in place of taking PACS 001 and PACS 002.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)

Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Breadth Requirement

For the BFA students must complete a minimum of 53 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department that offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

V. Major Requirements

77 units from the following:

ARTH 007Survey of World Art to 14004
ARTH 009Survey of World Art After 14004
ARTH 116Contemporary World Art 1945 to Present4
ARTS 005Drawing3
ARTS 007Principles of 2-D Design and Color3
ARTS 009Principles of 3-D Design3
ARTS 011Digital Photography3
ARTS 021Life Drawing I3
ARTS 023Painting I3
ARTS 037Sculpture3
ARTS 073Freshman Seminar1
ARTS 059Printmaking I3
ARTS 073Freshman Seminar1
ARTS 087Internship1-4
ARTS 089Practicum1-4
ARTS 095Video I3
ARTS 141Photography II3
ARTS 183Professional Practices in the Arts3
Select 18 units of the following:18
Chinese Art History
Japanese Art History
Watercolor Painting
Graphic Design I
Print Media Graphics
Time Based Media: Web Design
Video II
Time Based Media: Motion Graphics
Life Drawing II
Painting II
Illustration
3-D Studio I
Printmaking II
Internship
Practicum
Independent Study
Undergraduate Research
Visual Arts in Education
Aesthetics of Film
Creative Writing: Fiction
Film Production
Film History
Playwriting
ARTS 181AInterdisciplinary Studio3
ARTS 181BInterdisciplinary Studio3
ARTS 185Studio Art Seminar III4

Bachelor of Fine Arts Major in Graphic Design

Students must complete a minimum of 136 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of fine arts degree with a major in graphic design.

I. General Education Requirements

Minimum 42 units and 12 courses that include:

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from below in place of taking PACS 001 and PACS 002.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)

Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

IV. Breadth Requirement

For the BFA students must complete a minimum of 53 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Courses include general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

V. Major Requirements

Minimum 83 units that include:

ARTH 101History of Graphic Design4
ARTH 11420th Century Art and Film4
ARTS 005Drawing3
ARTS 007Principles of 2-D Design and Color3
ARTS 009Principles of 3-D Design3
ARTS 021Life Drawing I3
ARTS 073Freshman Seminar1
ARTS 075Graphic Design I3
ARTS 077Graphic Design II3
ARTS 079Typography I3
ARTS 081Typography II3
ARTS 091Print Media Graphics3
ARTS 095Video I3
ARTS 103Graphic Production3
ARTS 105Time Based Media: Web Design3
ARTS 115Time Based Media: Motion Graphics3
ARTS 127Illustration3
ARTS 141Photography II3
ARTS 171Graphic Design III3
ARTS 173Graphic Design Seminar3
ARTS 175Senior Graphic Design Seminar4
Select one of the following:3
Painting I
Watercolor Painting
Select one of the following:3
Internship
Practicum
ARTH 116Contemporary World Art 1945 to Present4

VI. Advanced Practice

Select two of the following:6
Printmaking I
Life Drawing II
Painting II
Printmaking II
Internship
Practicum
Independent Study
Special Topics
Undergraduate Research

Bachelor of Arts Major in Media X

Students must complete a minimum of 124 units with a Pacific cumulative and major/program grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn the bachelor of arts degree with a major in media x.

I. General Education Requirements

Minimum 42 units and 12 courses that include:

PACS 001What is a Good Society4
PACS 002Topical Seminar on a Good Society4
PACS 003What is an Ethical Life?3

Note: 1) Pacific Seminars cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit. 2) Transfer students with 28 or more transfer units complete 2 additional General Education elective courses from below in place of taking PACS 001 and PACS 002.

One course from each subdivision below:

Social and Behavioral Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
or a second IIIA Natural Sciences course

Note: 1) No more than 2 courses from a single discipline may be applied to meet the requirements of the general education program.

II. Diversity Requirement

Students must complete one diversity course (3-4 units)

Note: 1) Transfer students with 28 units or more transfer units prior to fall 2011 are encouraged but not required to complete a designated course prior to graduation. 2) Courses may be used also to meet general education and/or major/minor requirements.

III. College of the Pacific BA Requirement

Students must complete one year of college instruction or equivalent training in a language other than English.

Note: 1) Transfer students with sophomore standing are exempt from this requirement.

IV. Fundamental Skills

Students must demonstrate competence in:

Writing
Quantitative analysis

V. Breadth Requirement

Students must complete 64 units outside the primary discipline of the first major, regardless of the department who offers the course(s) in that discipline. (Course includes general education courses, transfer courses, CPCE/EXTN units, internships, etc.)

VI. Major Requirements

MEDX 011Critical Media Making (Tools)4
MEDX 013Media Literacies4
MEDX 021Liveness in a Mediated Age4
MEDX 109Capstone4
Experiential Learning *4
20 units from the following:20
Digital Photography
Video I
Time Based Media: Web Design
Time Based Media: Motion Graphics
Asian Cinemas
Media Production
Introduction to Computer Science
Data Structures
Aesthetics of Film
Screenwriting
Film Production
Film History
Shakespeare
Introduction to Digital Humanities
Cine hispano/Hispanic Film
Stage Makeup Fundamentals
Theatrical Design Fundamentals
Beginning Acting
Acting for the Camera
What's Past is Prologue: Practice and Perspective in Theatre History II
*

Experiential Learning can come from the following:  MEDX 187,  MEDX 189 or MEDX 197.

Minor in Art History

Students must complete a minimum of 20 units and 5 courses with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in art history.

Minor Requirements:

ARTH 007Survey of World Art to 14004
ARTH 009Survey of World Art After 14004
ARTH 11420th Century Art and Film4
ARTH 116Contemporary World Art 1945 to Present4
Select one of the following:4
Chinese Art History
Japanese Art History

 

Note: A minimum of 10 units from the Minor course of study must be completed at Pacific.

Minor in Graphic Design

Students must complete a minimum of 21-22 units and 7 courses with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in graphic design.

Minor Requirements

ARTS 075Graphic Design I3
ARTS 077Graphic Design II3
ARTS 079Typography I3
Select one of the following:3
Drawing
Principles of 2-D Design and Color
Select one of the following:3
Print Media Graphics
Time Based Media: Motion Graphics
Select one of the following:3
History of Graphic Design
Graphic Production
Select one additional elective from the following:3
Video I
Time Based Media: Web Design
Photography II
Graphic Design III
Graphic Design Seminar

 

Note: 1) The Foundations level courses ARTS 005/ARTS 007 and ARTS 075 should be completed by the end of the first year. 2) ARTS 115 and ARTS 173 are considered capstone courses and are to be taken during the last year of study. 3) A minimum of 12 units from the Minor course of study must be completed at Pacific.

Minor in Studio Arts

Students must complete a minimum of 20 units and 5 courses with a Pacific minor grade point average of 2.0 in order to earn a minor in studio arts.

Minor Requirements

Minimum 11 units in foundational courses that include:

ARTH 009Survey of World Art After 14004
Select one of the following:3
Visual Arts Exploration
Contemporary World Art 1945 to Present
Select one of the following:3
Principles of 2-D Design and Color
Principles of 3-D Design
Three ARTS Electives9

 

Note: 1) These nine units may be in one area such as ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture. They may also be earned in courses from two or more of these areas. 2) Students are encouraged to consult a Studio Art Faculty Advisor to plan your Minor as not all courses are offered every semester. 3) A minimum of 12 units from the Minor course of study must be completed at Pacific.

Art History Courses

ARTH 007. Survey of World Art to 1400. 4 Units.

This foundational level art history course surveys the major periods of world art from the Stone Age to the onset of the Renaissance in the West during the 14th-century. This is a lecture-based course that uses visual images to examine the characteristics and styles of each period. Works of art are placed in their aesthetic, social, and cultural contexts. The course provides an introduction to the discipline of art history. (GE2C)

ARTH 009. Survey of World Art After 1400. 4 Units.

A continuation of ARTH 007, this course surveys the history of world art from the fifteenth century to the present and considers major works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the applied arts. The course pays particular attention to situating works of art in their aesthetic, social, and cultural contexts and it also provides an introduction to the discipline of art history. (GE2C)

ARTH 087. Internship. 2-4 Units.

This off-campus internship offers non-classroom experiences/projects related to art history.

ARTH 089. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

This off-campus practicum offers non-classroom experiences/ projects related to art history.

ARTH 101. History of Graphic Design. 4 Units.

A survey of the development of graphic communication introduced by formal analysis of major works of graphic design within the context of their time and influence on later works. This course highlights significant events in communication and graphic design from 1450 to the present. Prerequisite: ARTS 075 or permission of instructor. (GE2C)

ARTH 108. Renaissance Art and Architecture. 4 Units.

Students examine the art (painting, sculpture and architecture) of the 15th and 16th centuries in Italy and Northern Europe. The course focuses on the major artists of the period who include Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Bramante, and Titian. The works of art are discussed in their artistic, historical and cultural contexts. (GE2C)

ARTH 110. 17th Century Art: Age of Rembrandt. 4 Units.

This course examines the masters of 17th century art. Major themes include the development of naturalism, a new interest in space, time and light, and relationship to artistic tradition.

ARTH 112. 19th Century European Art. 4 Units.

Major artists and artistic movements of the period are explored and include Neoclassicism, Romanticiscm, Realism and Impressionism. Students analyze the effects of gender upon representation and artistic practice, the effects of politics and class upon visual representation and the impact of urbanization. Painting, sculpture, photography, and architecture are considered. Art historical methods that include formalism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, and gender theory are explored. (GE2C, GEND)

ARTH 114. 20th Century Art and Film. 4 Units.

Major styles of the 20th century that include Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism, etc., and their appearance in visual arts, theater design, and film are explored. Students also evaluate how Western European artists borrowed imagery from other cultures and their relationship to colonialist concerns. Students also consider representations of the body and how this imagery relates to gender constructions. The effects of urbanization upon the artistic enterprise and the development of abstract and non-objective art are also considered. This course satisfies a requirement of Film Studies minor. (FILM, GE2C, GEND)

ARTH 116. Contemporary World Art 1945 to Present. 4 Units.

This course explores major artists, styles, and movements in world art from 1945 to the present. Gestural abstraction, Pop, Photo Realism, Happenings, Video, Performance, Conceptual and Political art as well as film are a few of the trends that are considered. Ever-expanding notions of what constitutes art in this pluralistic era is also examined. This course satisfies a requirement of the Film Studies minor. (FILM, GE2C, GEND)

ARTH 120. Chinese Art History. 4 Units.

This course is an introductory survey of the visual arts of China, from the Stone Age to the present. Students analyze works of art stylistically and their meanings are examined within original political and social contexts. China's enduring artistic tradition is emphasized. (GE2C)

ARTH 122. Japanese Art History. 4 Units.

This introductory course surveys the visual arts of Japan from prehistoric to the present. Students analyze works of art for their style, meanings, and original political and social contexts. How artists worked within Japanese artistic tradition and how they absorbed influences from abroad is emphasized. (GE2C)

ARTH 130. Greek Art and Architecture. 4 Units.

This course offers an introductory survey of the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Students explore the stylistic development of Greek sculpture, painting and architecture and examine what this art can tell us about the ancient Greeks and how extensively it has influenced our modern world. This course is offered in alternate years.

ARTH 132. Roman Art and Architecture. 4 Units.

This introductory course surveys the art and architecture of ancient Etruria and Rome from 600 B.C.E to the 4th century C.E. Students explore the role of Roman art and architecture and its Etruscan influences in Roman life and history. Attention is given to examples of Roman influence that surround us today. This course is offered in alternate years.

ARTH 187. Internship. 2-4 Units.

This off-campus internship offers non-classroom experiences/projects related to art history.

ARTH 189. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

This off-campus, non-classroom practicum offers experiences/projects related to art history.

ARTH 191. Independent Study. 2-4 Units.

This course requires permission of faculty to enroll. Unless indicated, independent study courses may be counted only as electives.

ARTH 193. Special Topics. 4 Units.

ARTH 197. Independent Research. 2-4 Units.

Studio Art Courses

ARTS 003. Visual Arts Exploration. 4 Units.

This hands-on course is designed as an experiential studio/discussion course with emphasis upon acquiring practical skills and appreciation for the theoretical aspects of the creative process. This course explores two-dimensional and three-dimensional art forms such as drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture and ceramics. (GE2C)

ARTS 005. Drawing. 3 Units.

This foundational level hands-on course in drawing has an emphasis upon skill building and the visual and conceptual possibilities of art through drawing. A variety of projects and materials are used to investigate the medium's history, traditional approaches and expressive possibilities. (GE2C)

ARTS 007. Principles of 2-D Design and Color. 3 Units.

This foundational level hands-on course introduces the theoretical application of the elements and principles of 2-D design and the practical applications of color theory. Exercises in visual thinking and the use of traditional principles of composition and two-dimensional media are emphasized through sequential, skill building projects. (GE2C)

ARTS 009. Principles of 3-D Design. 3 Units.

This foundational level hands-on course introduces the theory and principles of 3-D design found in organic and man-made objects. Developing creative design solutions is emphasized through observations of nature architecture, visual art, industrial design and sequential, skill building projects. (GE2C)

ARTS 011. Digital Photography. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the theory, process, and aesthetics of digital photography. Through a series of practical and conceptual assignments, students learn to work with digital cameras and a selection of software for image editing and printing. Students must provide their own digital cameras with fully manual exposure controls. Approximately $150 should be budgeted for other photographic materials that are not supplied by the University. Additional lab fees also apply. (FILM, GE2C)

ARTS 021. Life Drawing I. 3 Units.

This course places primary emphasis on the development of visual and perceptual skills relative to drawing the human body. This course covers exercises in the anatomical, structural, formal and expressive factors of figure drawing. Prerequisite: ARTS 005.

ARTS 023. Painting I. 3 Units.

This course introduces the concepts, methods and materials of oil painting. Drawing and painting skill, creative problem solving, artistic intent, personal imagery and aesthetic judgement will be developed in this course. (GE2C)

ARTS 037. Sculpture. 3 Units.

This introductory hands-on course explores the concepts and creative potential of sculpture. Through a sequence of applied assignments and exploration of a variety of media (clay, wood, plaster, metal, etc.) students learn to use materials and tools to create sculpture. (GE2C)

ARTS 057. Watercolor Painting. 3 Units.

Through demonstrations, readings, discussions and studio work this course introduces a variety of materials, techniques, traditions and contemporary uses of watercolor painting. A sequence of practical assignments incorporate aesthetic and conceptual development to build skill with the media and personal expression. Prerequisite: ARTS 005.

ARTS 059. Printmaking I. 3 Units.

This course is an introductory hands-on course that examines the historical and aesthetic development of the processes, materials and techniques of printmaking. A sequence of applied assignments incorporate the aesthetic and conceptual development to achieve basic mastery of the printmaking process.

ARTS 073. Freshman Seminar. 1 Unit.

This Freshman Seminar introduces the student majoring in either Studio Art or Graphic Design to issues related to professional practice, philosophical direction, and the creative process in the visual arts.

ARTS 075. Graphic Design I. 3 Units.

This course is a beginning non-computer studio course that gives students a broad and thorough exposure to the practice and profession of Graphic Design. Prerequisites: ARTS 005 and ARTS 007 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 077. Graphic Design II. 3 Units.

This intermediate level course expands on the skills and knowledge acquired in Graphic Design I. The course emphasizes practical assignments that examine applied problem solving and professional solutions for graphic designers. Specific themes/topics for the course include visual grouping and hierarchy, visual identity development and application of Gestalt theory. Prerequisite: ARTS 075 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 079. Typography I. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the study of the letterform as a cornerstone of graphic design. It focuses on how typography can be used as a communicative device as well as a graphic, compositional and expressive element. Topics include letterform anatomy, letterform analysis, measuring systems, typographic identification, and practical issues of setting and using type effectively. Prerequisite: ARTS 075 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 081. Typography II. 3 Units.

Students who enroll have the opportunity to apply the principles and concepts introduced in ARTS 079 to more complex typographic problems. Directions involving experimental and theoretical as well as practical and functional applications of type will be explored. A Macintosh laptop computer is required and lab fees apply. Prerequisite: ARTS 079 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 087. Internship. 1-4 Units.

The internship offers off-campus, non-classroom experience that applies to the studio arts in a professional context.

ARTS 089. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

The practicum offers on-campus, non-classroom experiences/projects that relate to discipline-specific studio arts.

ARTS 091. Print Media Graphics. 3 Units.

This course explores graphic design for publication. Assignments examine and develop creative solutions for graphic design and methods of publishing in print utilizing software applications in graphic design and contemporary publishing. Lab fees apply. Prerequisite: ARTS 079 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 095. Video I. 3 Units.

Video I is an introductory level course teaching the construction of time-based visual narratives. Students will develop projects using camera generated images and time-based software applications. Assignments focus on sequential storytelling, animation, video editing, and thematic development. Students must provide their own digital still cameras for this course. Approximately $100 is needed for other materials and equipment that are not supplied by the University. Additional lab fees. (FILM)

ARTS 103. Graphic Production. 3 Units.

This course examines methods and procedures of efficient production practices that include typographic issues, image adjustment, digital file format preparation and related technologies for the graphic design student. Lab fees apply. Prerequisite: ARTS 077 and ARTS 091 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 105. Time Based Media: Web Design. 3 Units.

This intermediate level course for studio art and graphic design majors teaches the development of web sites for commercial applications and artist's portfolios. Emphasis is placed upon effective approaches to the organization and design of web sites for self-promotion, employment, and e-commerce. Lab fees apply. Prerequisites: ARTS 045 and ARTS 091 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 107. Video II. 3 Units.

Video II is an advanced video course. Students will be assigned advanced and self-directed long-term projects, as well as learning more advanced software techniques for video editing. Approximately $100 should also be budgeted for other materials and equipment that are not supplied by the University. Prerequisite: ARTS 095.

ARTS 115. Time Based Media: Motion Graphics. 3 Units.

This course challenges the student to create interpretive design solutions for complex interactive problems, which rely primarily upon motion and time to communicate visual ideas. Students explore these highly conceptual problems through use of digital technology. The course emphasizes dynamic, thoughtful, and appropriate visual communication solutions. Lab fees apply. Prerequisites: ARTS 045 and ARTS 091 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 121. Life Drawing II. 3 Units.

This course builds upon the experiences and skills achieved in Life Drawing I. The course emphasizes personal expression and advanced drawing from the nude figure. Prerequisite: ARTS 021.

ARTS 123. Painting II. 3 Units.

A studio course builds upon the experience and skills achieved in beginning drawing and painting. Instruction focuses upon problem solving using traditional and contemporary solutions and media. The development of personal style and expression is emphasized. Prerequisites: ARTS 005 and ARTS 023.

ARTS 127. Illustration. 3 Units.

This course examines the historical and applied application of visual art for publication and mass media. A series of practical assignments investigate a variety of sub-themes routinely practiced by illustrators such as advertising, editorial, scientific and book illustration. Prerequisites: ARTS 021 and ARTS 023.

ARTS 133. 3-D Studio I. 3 Units.

This course emphasizes intermediate skill building and conceptual development for three-dimensional art forms and it builds upon foundational skills of ceramics and sculpture, students explore contemporary trends, methods and materials applicable to 3-D studio practice. Prerequisite: ARTS 035 or ARTS 037.

ARTS 141. Photography II. 3 Units.

This intermediate course builds upon level one instruction in digital photography. This course introduces students to the photographic studio with practical instruction in studio lighting theory and techniques. The course also includes advanced camera and digital software applications for professional photographers who create photographs for editorial illustration, publication and exhibition. A laptop computer, preferably Mac, is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 045. (FILM)

ARTS 151. Printmaking II. 3 Units.

This intermediate level course emphasizes mastery of a simple process introduced in ARTS 059. Students are required to conduct historical, technical and aesthetic research to provide background and rigor to their investigation and completed work. Prerequisite: ARTS 059.

ARTS 171. Graphic Design III. 3 Units.

This is an advanced level course with intensive involvement in project development. Emphasis is placed upon research and selecting design processes, client communication and professional presentation of work. Macintosh laptop computer required. Lab fees apply. Prerequisites: ARTS 077 and ARTS 081 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 173. Graphic Design Seminar. 3 Units.

This is the first of two capstone courses that emphasizes research in the field of graphic design. It is an advanced level course in project and portfolio development. Prerequisite: ARTS 171 or permission of instructor. BFA majors in graphic design with junior standing.

ARTS 175. Senior Graphic Design Seminar. 4 Units.

This seminar is only open to BFA majors in graphic design with senior standing. This capstone course emphasizes research in the field of graphic design, and completion of a senior presentation and exhibition is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 173 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 181A. Interdisciplinary Studio. 3 Units.

ARTS 181A and ARTS 181B is an advanced level studio course that focuses on the development of research skills and interdisciplinary practice in the arts. Anchored in the tradition of rigorous studio practices, and enhanced by innovative approaches to creative thinking and research, interdisciplinary studio offers a context for practicing art in the contemporary/multidisciplinary arts environment. Interdisciplinary studies of drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, and three-dimensional media are supported through close guidance and mentorship by art and design faculty. Junior standing or permission of instructor.

ARTS 181B. Interdisciplinary Studio. 3 Units.

ARTS 181A and ARTS 181B is an advanced level studio course that focuses on the development of research skills and interdisciplinary practice in the arts. Anchored in the tradition of rigorous studio practices, and enhanced by innovative approaches to creative thinking and research, interdisciplinary studio offers a context for practicing art in the contemporary/multidisciplinary arts environment. Interdisciplinary studies of drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, and three-dimensional media are supported through close guidance and mentorship by art and design faculty. Junior standing or permission of instructor.

ARTS 183. Professional Practices in the Arts. 3 Units.

This course prepares Bachelor of Fine Arts degree candidates for graduate study and/or entry level to a professional art career. This course involves reading/discussions, fieldtrips and practical assignments that emphasize professional identify, self-promotion, in addition to legal and business practices for artists.

ARTS 185. Studio Art Seminar III. 4 Units.

This is the capstone course for the BFA in Studio Arts. This course involves intensive studio work in a chosen concentration and it includes research, critiques and fieldtrips that define the activities undertaken during this course. Emphasis is placed upon preparing a senior thesis and a senior exhibition. Prerequisites: ARTS 181 and ARTS 183.

ARTS 187. Internship. 2-4 Units.

The internship offers off-campus, non-classroom experience that applies to the studio arts in a professional context.

ARTS 189. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

The practicum offers on-campus, non-classroom experiences/projects that relate to discipline-specific graphic studio arts.

ARTS 189A. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

The practicum offers on-campus, non-classroom experiences/projects that relate to discipline-specific graphic studio arts.

ARTS 189B. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

ARTS 189C. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

ARTS 189D. Practicum. 1-4 Units.

ARTS 191. Independent Study. 2-4 Units.

Enrolled by permission of the faculty only. Unless indicated, independent study courses may be counted only as electives. IS Contracts must be completed by student and faculty and approved by the department Chair. Prerequisites: Completion of foundations and upper division course work or permission of Department Chair.

ARTS 193. Special Topics. 2-4 Units.

ARTS 197. Undergraduate Research. 2-4 Units.

Undergraduate research in studio art is conducted in consultation with a faculty advisor. Student research focuses upon selected topics in the studio arts-related inquiries and advanced research in the field. Students who take this course must participate in the Pacific Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference (PURC) held each spring. Permission from Department Chair or supervising faculty.

Bachelor of Arts in Art

  1. Demonstrate competence with the principles of visual organization, including the ability to work with visual elements in two and three dimensions; color theory and its applications; and drawing.
  2. Apply knowledge of the principles of visual organization to conduct formal analysis of artworks.
  3. Demonstrate a working knowledge of media, technologies and equipment applicable to their area of emphasis. This includes environmentally responsible practice.
  4. Identify the major historical achievements in world art, ethical and formal issues, current processes, and directions of their area(s) of emphasis.
  5. Integrate skills in studio practice, theory, analysis, media and technology to address a variety of art problems, independently and in collaboration with others.
  6. Demonstrate through public exhibition the capability to produce work that embodies a coherent set of artistic and intellectual goals. (Senior Art Exhibition)
  7. Demonstrate ability to form and defend value judgments about art and to communicate art ideas, concepts, and requirements to professionals and laypersons related to the practice of the major field. (Senior Thesis)

Bachelor of Fine Art in Studio Art

  1. Demonstrate competence with the principles of visual organization, including the ability to work with visual elements in two and three dimensions; color theory and its applications; and drawing.
  2. Apply knowledge of the principles of visual organization to conduct formal analysis of artworks.
  3. Demonstrate a working knowledge of media, technologies and equipment applicable to their area(s) of emphasis. This includes environmentally responsible practice.
  4. Identify the major historical achievements in world art, ethical and formal issues, current processes, and directions of their area(s) of emphasis.
  5. Integrate skills in studio practice, theory, analysis, media and technology to address a variety of art problems, independently and in collaboration with others.
  6. Present work that demonstrates perceptual acuity, conceptual understanding, and technical facility at a professional entry level in their chosen field(s).
  7. Demonstrate proficiency in communication, presentation, and business skills necessary to engage in professional practice in their major field. This proficiency is based on an understanding of organizational structures and working patterns in artistic, intellectual, economic, technological, and political contexts. (Capstone Seminar Series)
  8. Demonstrate through public exhibition the achievement of professional, entry-level competence in the major area of specialization, including significant technical mastery, capability to produce work and solve professional problems independently, and a coherent set of artistic/intellectual goals. (Senior Art Exhibition)
  9. Demonstrate ability to form and defend value judgments about art and to communicate art ideas, concepts, and requirements to professionals and laypersons related to the practice of the major field. (Senior Thesis)

Bachelor of Fine Art in Graphic Design

  1. Solve communication problems, including the skills of problem identification, research and information gathering, analysis, generation of alternative solutions, prototyping and user testing, and evaluation of outcomes.
  2. Describe and respond to the audiences and contexts, which communication solutions must address, including recognition of the physical, cognitive, cultural, and social human factors that shape design decisions.
  3. Create and develop visual form in response to communication problems, including an understanding of principles of visual organization/ composition, information hierarchy, symbolic representation, typography, aesthetics, and the construction of meaningful messages.
  4. Understand design-related tools and technology, including their roles in the creation, reproduction, and distribution of visual messages. Relevant tools and technologies include, but are not limited to, drawing, offset printing, photography, and time-based and interactive media (film, video, computer multimedia).
  5. Demonstrate proficiency in communication, presentation, and business skills necessary to engage in professional practice in graphic design including the ability to organize and manage design projects and to productively collaborate with others in a team. This competency is based on an understanding of organizational structures and working patterns in design, intellectual, economic, technological, and political contexts. (Capstone Seminar Series)
  6. Demonstrate ability to form and defend value judgments about graphic design and to communicate art ideas, concepts, and requirements to professionals and laypersons related to the practice.
  7. Identify the major historical achievements, current issues, processes, and directions in the graphic design field as well as in art in general.
  8. Identify current intercultural and global issues as they relate to visual communication. Apply ethical reasoning to create sustainable and socially and environmentally responsible design solutions.

Minor in Art History

  1. Be familiar with major artists, styles, and monuments in world art from prehistoric times until the present.
  2. Be able employ both in verbal and written form the vocabulary used to discuss works of art, formally, thematically, and within their cultural and historical contexts.
  3. Be able to write at least one lengthy research paper employing art historical research strategies and critical thinking skills.

Minor in Graphic Design

  1. Demonstrate a foundational level of ability to solve communication problems, including the skills of problem identification, research and information gathering and analysis.
  2. Describe and respond to the audiences and contexts, which communication solutions must address, including recognition of the physical, cognitive, cultural, and social human factors that shape design decisions.
  3. Create and develop visual form in response to communication problems, including an understanding of principles of visual organization/ composition, information hierarchy, symbolic representation, typography, aesthetics, and the construction of meaningful messages.
  4. Understand basic design-related tools and technology, including their roles in the creation, reproduction, and distribution of visual messages.
  5. Demonstrate ability to form and defend value judgments about graphic design and to communicate art ideas, concepts, and requirements to professionals and laypersons related to the practice.

Minor in Studio Art

  1. Demonstrate a foundational level of competence with the principles of visual organization, including the ability to work with visual elements in two and three dimensions.
  2. Apply knowledge of the principles of visual organization to conduct formal analysis of artworks.
  3. Identify major artistic achievements from the Renaissance to Contemporary times.
  4. Produce artwork in one or two media that reflect the beginnings of a personal style.

Visual Arts Faculty

Jennifer Little, Associate Professor and Chair, 2005, BFA, Washington University, 2001; MFA, University of Texas, Austin, 2005, jlittle@pacific.edu, (209) 946-3175, ART 111

Merrill Schleier, , Professor Emeritus, 1982, BA, The City College of New York, 1973; MA, University of California, Berkeley, 1976; PhD, 1983, member, Phi Beta Kappa.

Brett DeBoer, Associate Professor , 1999, BFA, University of Northern Colorado, 1977; MS, Parsons School of Design, 1985; MFA, Rochester Institute of Technology, 1989, bdeboer@pacific.edu, (209) 946-3097, ART 112

Daniel Kasser, Professor, 1984, BA, Humboldt State University, 1980; MFA, University of New Mexico, 1991, dkasser@pacific.edu, (209) 946-3101, ART 113

Lucinda Kasser, Associate Professor, 1995, BA, Humboldt State University, 1979; MA, California State University, Sacramento, 1989,, lkasser@pacific.edu, (209) 946-2242, ART 108

Marie Lee, Associate Professor, 2009, BA, Michigan State University, 2000; BFA Colorado State University, 2002; MFA, Colorado State University, 2005, mlee2@pacific.edu, (209) 946-7323, ART 120

Monika Meler, Assistant Professor, 2010, BFA, Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, 2003; MA, Purdue University, 2005; MFA Tyler School of Art, 2007, mmeler@pacific.edu, (209) 946-2864, ART 101